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Editorials

  • High water mark

    "I'm still kicking ... It will get better as time goes by, but we won't ever forget it." - Hilda Perkins, flood victim

     

    Hilda Perkins' words ring true for many people throughout Marion County who were impacted by the 2010 flood, which occurred the first weekend in May of 2010.

  • Keep the ball rolling

    Marion County citizens have waited for too long for enhanced 911, and it still may be years before E911 is in place.

    But last week, we took one small step closer to the finish line.

    On April 19, county and city officials met with representatives of MapSync and the Lincoln Trail Area Development District. MapSync and LTADD have been hired by the city and the county to complete the mapping and addressing that is necessary for the county to be eligible for E911.

  • Compromise

    "A compromise is the art of dividing a cake in such a way that everyone believes he has the biggest piece." - Ludwig Erhard 

     

    Monday night the Lebanon City Council and the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission made a compromise that, for now, has postponed the council's decision to eliminate the city's restaurant tax.

  • How to help

    Watching the television news, reading the newspapers and surfing the Internet, images of the disaster in Japan are everywhere.

    On March 11, Japan was hit by one of the largest earthquakes ever recorded. The magnitude-9.0 quake set off a deadly tsunami that crashed into the small island nation. Thousands of people are dead, many more are still missing or injured and almost half a million people are homeless. The country is also facing a nuclear crisis.

  • Penny wise

    The Lebanon City Council’s recent vote to eliminate the city’s restaurant tax, which would kill the local tourism commission, has created a buzz around town.

    But, it’s not a done deal yet.

    The council must approve two readings of an amendment to its tourism ordinance and that amendment must be published officially before the tax would end.

  • Educated Public

    As the Marion County Board of Education goes through the process of hiring a new superintendent for the second time in less than two years, its members must be aware that everyone is watching.

    We’ve said it before and we’ll repeat it here: The selection of a superintendent is the single most important decision the board will make. Other decisions are certainly important, but none are as big as who will be the next leader of our school district.

  • Mission or intermission?

    The mission of the Lebanon Tourist & Convention Commission is to develop, increase and promote tourism in Lebanon and surrounding areas by featuring its history, culture, products and recreation/convention facilities.

    Our goal is to become a choice destination for group travel, conventions and individual leisure/recreation travel. Through these efforts, the commission seeks to increase visitor spending, local revenue and job development, thereby enhancing the area's quality of life.

  • Home or away

    People have asked - and for good reason - why the superintendent's residency matters. It doesn't affect what goes on in the classrooms in Marion County. It doesn't affect test scores. So, why is it an issue?

    It may seem trivial on first look, but it matters for reasons we have yet to hear anyone explain. The next superintendent's contract will have a residency clause, as it should. The question that has been asked, but not answered (at least not publicly), is why is this in the contract at all?

  • Flip Flop

    People don't usually discuss flip-flops in the dead of winter, but it seems to fit some recent actions and statements by a couple members of the Marion County Board of Education.

    Just six months ago, DeLane Pinkston and Bernard Miles were singing the praises of Superintendent Donald Smith. Since the November elections - when three of Pinkston and Miles' colleagues were voted out of office - it seems they have had a change of heart.

  • Dreaming Big

    Martin Luther King could have chosen an easy life. He could have chosen safety and security, but instead he ventured out into the deep waters, to borrow an analogy from William Turner, a professor at Berea College and this year's featured speaker for the Martin Luther King celebration at First Baptist Church.