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Today's Opinions

  • Kentucky Senate majority rolls out it priorities

    From the patriotic medleys of the 100th Army Band to chants of citizens passionately advocating a cause, the sounds echoing through the hallways of our Capitol signaled just one thing – the 150th General Assembly was in session.
    After just the first week, Senate Majority had rolled out its priorities. It’s 13 bills that are a mix of both new and familiar. Many of the bills have been discussed in concept through last year. Some of the bills will even enjoy bipartisan support.

  • Kentucky Senate majority rolls out it priorities

    From the patriotic medleys of the 100th Army Band to chants of citizens passionately advocating a cause, the sounds echoing through the hallways of our Capitol signaled just one thing – the 150th General Assembly was in session.
    After just the first week, Senate Majority had rolled out its priorities. It’s 13 bills that are a mix of both new and familiar. Many of the bills have been discussed in concept through last year. Some of the bills will even enjoy bipartisan support.

  • Filing legislation and kicking off 2016 regular session

    If the final days of a legislative session are spent deciding what laws the General Assembly will pass, then the first few days are focused on what the House and Senate hope will be on that list.
    Setting those priorities was the main theme last week as other legislators and I returned to the Capitol and began filing legislation to kick off the 2016 regular session.
    In the House, we will again work toward strengthening the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System (KTRS), which is facing a multi-billion dollar liability and needs a plan to adequately address it.

  • Filing legislation and kicking off 2016 regular session

    If the final days of a legislative session are spent deciding what laws the General Assembly will pass, then the first few days are focused on what the House and Senate hope will be on that list.
    Setting those priorities was the main theme last week as other legislators and I returned to the Capitol and began filing legislation to kick off the 2016 regular session.
    In the House, we will again work toward strengthening the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System (KTRS), which is facing a multi-billion dollar liability and needs a plan to adequately address it.

  • God bless law enforcement officers

    I had the opportunity to read the Enterprise’s story on Floyd Cook. Cook was certainly not a monster. He was much worse.
    Cook’s sister stated how much he loved animals and his church going practices because he loved animals and went to church. Does that give him the right to shoot law enforcement officers and try to run over them with his vehicle? Does loving animals and going to church give him the right to go around raping women?

  • God bless law enforcement officers

    I had the opportunity to read the Enterprise’s story on Floyd Cook. Cook was certainly not a monster. He was much worse.
    Cook’s sister stated how much he loved animals and his church going practices because he loved animals and went to church. Does that give him the right to shoot law enforcement officers and try to run over them with his vehicle? Does loving animals and going to church give him the right to go around raping women?

  • A look back: As a new year approaches, let's look back at what Kentucky has accomplished

    As the General Assembly readies for a return to the Capitol next week to start another legislative session, it is worth taking a look back on what has happened since the last one ended in late March.
    This period is known as the interim, and it gives the House and Senate’s two dozen joint committees – plus several temporary ones – time to review the issues affecting the state in a less pressure-filled setting. In some cases, meetings are held across the state.

  • A look back: As a new year approaches, let's look back at what Kentucky has accomplished

    As the General Assembly readies for a return to the Capitol next week to start another legislative session, it is worth taking a look back on what has happened since the last one ended in late March.
    This period is known as the interim, and it gives the House and Senate’s two dozen joint committees – plus several temporary ones – time to review the issues affecting the state in a less pressure-filled setting. In some cases, meetings are held across the state.