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Today's Opinions

  • Free people read freely

     

  • MCPS has more issues than bedbugs

     

  • Building your own robot

    By Ken Begley

    Hey, I’m not kidding with the title of this story.
    Just because you live in small town America do not think there aren’t some incredibly talented folks living all around you doing some unbelievable things.  
    I love this job! I get to meet them and hear their stories!
    Anyway, a friend of mine named Mark told me how his next door neighbor had spent the past five years working part-time on building his own robot. 
    What the heck?
    Mark asked me if I’d like to see it.

  • The Senate’s goal is to cut state’s long-term debt

    Addressing Kentucky’s underfunded pension systems was the top priority in the Senate’s version of House Bill (HB) 303, the state’s two-year budget, which passed the Kentucky Senate on March 23.

  • Education cuts never heal

    At the end of a legislative session, months of preparation and weeks of debate give way to a handful of days where the General Assembly and governor decide what will become law and what will have to wait.
    It’s a predictably busy time, especially when the budget is in the mix during even-numbered years.

  • Making the most of a career fair

    By Carter Dyson

    The upcoming 2016 Regional Job and Career Fair Expo is an excellent opportunity for job seekers to discover employment opportunities and to speak with local employers in person, and with some preparation, job seekers can reap the most benefit from their attendance.

  • Senate, House will have to compromise on budget

    After over two months of anticipation and debate, the Senate finally received the state budget bill from the House midway through the 11th week of the 2016 Kentucky General Assembly. We think the upcoming budget will reflect those needs for the betterment of the Commonwealth.

  • Education is a top priority in House budget

    In one sense, Kentucky’s budget doesn’t change much from year to year. A little more than half of every state dollar, for example, goes to our schools, colleges and universities. Another fourth is dedicated to Medicaid and other health services, about a tenth is spent on criminal justice and the final dime goes to everything else.
    While there is relatively little discussion in the General Assembly about those ratios, there is often lively debate on the best way to move each major area forward.