.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • The rewards of workforce development

    By Tommy Wheatley

    At the start of the summer of 1980, I was a college student looking forward to a seasonal job near Hardinsburg, Kentucky, my hometown. I was charged with overseeing a summer youth employment program, matching 16- to 21-year-old workers with non-profit employers.
    That summer, I first realized the impact the workforce development system has on individuals and our entire communities. But little did I know, the job was the start of my own lifelong career and passion.

  • The value of professional mentorship

    By Dr. Evelyn Ellis

    It’s been said that mentoring is a brain to pick, an ear to listen and a push in the right direction.
    In this column, I want to talk about the value of professional mentorship.  In my role with WKU Elizabethtown-Fort Knox and as a member of the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board, I’m charged with helping people succeed in their chosen career fields, from pursuing their education to connecting them with employers.

  • Summer program challenge our best and brightest

    Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.
    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.
    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • Transparency is crucial for KRS

    In Kentucky, some bleed blue, others bleed red, and today, the Kentucky Retirement System (KRS) bleeds green. An article from the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting on June 7 outlined how KRS had used contributions from current and future state employees to pay legal fees for the former KRS Board Chair in a lawsuit against Governor Matt Bevin.

  • So long, farewell

    By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    If you recall, in my first column I talked about finding a new radio station and how I had been unsuccessful. Well, I finally did find new radio stations and now it's time to change my radio presets back.
    Eight weeks ago, I wasn't even thinking about today. I wasn't thinking about packing and loading all of my stuff, half of which I didn't even need, and driving back to Kenton County. I wasn't thinking about it, I didn't want to think about it. And now I don't want to do it.

  • So long, farewell

    By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    If you recall, in my first column I talked about finding a new radio station and how I had been unsuccessful. Well, I finally did find new radio stations and now it's time to change my radio presets back.
    Eight weeks ago, I wasn't even thinking about today. I wasn't thinking about packing and loading all of my stuff, half of which I didn't even need, and driving back to Kenton County. I wasn't thinking about it, I didn't want to think about it. And now I don't want to do it.

  • Commisson must follow open meetings law

    The Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission are supposed to be the fun people in government. Lately, that hasn’t been the case.
    Two of the last three meetings were plagued by closed sessions, talks of discipline or removal of Executive Director Nena Olivier, and personnel decisions were discussed when the public had the right to know what was going on.

  • 'I believe in the future of agriculture...'

    By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    Late last week I was scrolling through Facebook and noticed a video PETA made about the dairy industry had worked its way into my newsfeed.
    I watched, deciding to see what shenanigans and propaganda they were spewing that day.
    They were on their soapbox, talking about how cruel the dairy industry is. How they keep their cows locked up, constantly pregnant and take their calves away as soon as they’re born.