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Today's Opinions

  • Action-packed week in the Kentucky Senate

    Floor votes, committee hearings, and spirited debate highlighted an action-packed second week of session in the Kentucky Senate. Guests from all corners of the Commonwealth were welcomed to Frankfort to speak on behalf of various bills.
    On Thursday, we were visited by hundreds of young and energetic faces celebrating Children’s Advocacy Day, sponsored by Kentucky Youth Advocates. The group hosted a rally in the capitol rotunda where several senate majority members were recognized for their efforts in standing up for Kentucky’s children.

  • Giving many Kentuckians a better chance to move forward

    An effort to help potentially tens of thousands of Kentuckians truly put their past behind them cleared a key legislative milestone on Friday when the Kentucky House voted to broaden eligibility for criminal expungement.

  • Early planning, local resources smooth transition to civilian workforce

    By Virgil McCloud

    Transitioning from military to civilian life, and finding the right fit in the civilian workforce, can be a frustrating and trying experience. As I’ve learned firsthand, leaving the military isn’t just about finding a new job. It’s leaving everything you’ve known for years and entering into new territory.
    Annually, in the Army alone, more than 100,000 soldiers make this transition. Of those, upwards of 3,000 exit from Fort Knox. This past year, I was one of them.

  • Trash talk isn’t cheap

    “History repeats itself, and that's one of the things that's wrong with history.” - Clarence Darrow

    In the case of Marion County and its delinquent garbage accounts, history is most certainly repeating itself.
    While it’s a new problem for Marion County Judge-Executive David Daugherty, who just began his second year as judge, it’s an old problem for the county and one that, frankly, I thought we had under control.

  • Kentucky Senate majority rolls out it priorities

    From the patriotic medleys of the 100th Army Band to chants of citizens passionately advocating a cause, the sounds echoing through the hallways of our Capitol signaled just one thing – the 150th General Assembly was in session.
    After just the first week, Senate Majority had rolled out its priorities. It’s 13 bills that are a mix of both new and familiar. Many of the bills have been discussed in concept through last year. Some of the bills will even enjoy bipartisan support.

  • God bless law enforcement officers

    I had the opportunity to read the Enterprise’s story on Floyd Cook. Cook was certainly not a monster. He was much worse.
    Cook’s sister stated how much he loved animals and his church going practices because he loved animals and went to church. Does that give him the right to shoot law enforcement officers and try to run over them with his vehicle? Does loving animals and going to church give him the right to go around raping women?

  • Filing legislation and kicking off 2016 regular session

    If the final days of a legislative session are spent deciding what laws the General Assembly will pass, then the first few days are focused on what the House and Senate hope will be on that list.
    Setting those priorities was the main theme last week as other legislators and I returned to the Capitol and began filing legislation to kick off the 2016 regular session.
    In the House, we will again work toward strengthening the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System (KTRS), which is facing a multi-billion dollar liability and needs a plan to adequately address it.

  • Keep in touch during the 2016 General Assembly

    As we usher in the New Year and the 150th regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly, I’m honored to represent your district. This will be my 13th year in the state legislature.
    During even-year sessions, we are required to pass a two-year budget for the commonwealth. It’s a tall order to pass a budget during even the most prosperous of times, but we’re committed to rolling up our sleeves and working together to adopt a fiscally responsible spending plan that addresses Kentucky’s most pressing needs. It’s a goal we all share.