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Today's Opinions

  • Senate prepares its budget proposal

  • The Katie Cambron Story

    By Ken Begley
    Guest Columnist

    "Can't" never "did" nothing.
    - Unknown author

    . . . is just beginning.

  • End of legislative session is in sight

    In one key way, legislative sessions are a lot like March Madness: The intensity picks up as the number of days winds down. That makes this week, then, the General Assembly's version of the Final Four.

  • Feeling fine despite the pink slime

    It was widely reported recently that companies that process ground beef for retail grocery stores add pink slime.
    Pink slime is basically beef trimmings that have been sprayed with ammonia to kill the e. coli and salmonella germs in the trimmings.
    ABC TV News showed people all upset because they weren't aware of what was being added to the meat.
    I really don't have a problem with these added beef trimmings. I've probably eaten it for years and thus far, I'm feeling just fine.

  • Growth opportunity

    Industrial hemp hasn't been legal to grow in the United States for decades.
    Not that people haven't wanted to grow it, but right or wrong, hemp has been lumped in with its botanical cousin, marijuana, for a long time.

  • MCHS making wishes come true

    Someone once said, "Raising teenagers is like nailing Jell-O to a tree."

    I vaguely remember what being a teenager was like, only I had a twin sister to boot. Twin teenage daughters... My mom probably wondered what she did to deserve such torture.

    After all, teenagers can be a real pain.

  • MCHS making wishes come true

    Someone once said, "Raising teenagers is like nailing Jell-O to a tree."

    I vaguely remember what being a teenager was like, only I had a twin sister to boot. Twin teenage daughters... My mom probably wondered what she did to deserve such torture.

    After all, teenagers can be a real pain.

  • House focuses on youngest, oldest citizens

    Most legislation that the General Assembly passes each year falls in one of two categories: It either protects, or it promotes.

    That was especially evident this past week in the Kentucky House of Representatives, which voted for bills that range from further limiting abuse of our youngest and oldest citizens to helping more students in the coalfields of Eastern Kentucky get their four-year college degree.