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Today's Opinions

  • Tourism industry is crucial for state’s economy and way of life

    Next year, Kentucky’s tourism industry will mark a major milestone when Mammoth Cave celebrates the 200th anniversary of its first commercial tour.
    The world’s longest cave is our country’s second-oldest paid attraction, trailing only Niagara Falls, and it and the surrounding national park have since become a major destination. It draws more than two million visitors a year above ground, and about a fourth of those tour the sights below.

  • Tourism industry is crucial for state’s economy and way of life

    Next year, Kentucky’s tourism industry will mark a major milestone when Mammoth Cave celebrates the 200th anniversary of its first commercial tour.
    The world’s longest cave is our country’s second-oldest paid attraction, trailing only Niagara Falls, and it and the surrounding national park have since become a major destination. It draws more than two million visitors a year above ground, and about a fourth of those tour the sights below.

  • Place matters in economic success

    By Edna Berger

    When I moved to Elizabethtown in the 1970s, I immediately felt connected to this community. I saw right away that this was a place with so much to offer, all driven by people who truly cared.
    I still recall when my child’s principal knew who I was and where I worked even though we had never met. I was blown away, but that’s just the sort of thing that turns a city into a quality community.

  • Place matters in economic success

    By Edna Berger

    When I moved to Elizabethtown in the 1970s, I immediately felt connected to this community. I saw right away that this was a place with so much to offer, all driven by people who truly cared.
    I still recall when my child’s principal knew who I was and where I worked even though we had never met. I was blown away, but that’s just the sort of thing that turns a city into a quality community.

  • Community bonds

    This week, we take a look back at the flood of 2010. By all accounts, it was the biggest flood anyone still living can remember.
    John Thomas, superintendent of Lebanon Water Works, recalls feelings of dread when he watched water enter the water plant in Calvary. If things had been a little worse, Marion County may not have had water service for weeks.
    In Bradfordsville, homes were overwhelmed by water. Fifteen houses had to be torn down, according to Mayor David Edelen.

  • Community bonds

    This week, we take a look back at the flood of 2010. By all accounts, it was the biggest flood anyone still living can remember.
    John Thomas, superintendent of Lebanon Water Works, recalls feelings of dread when he watched water enter the water plant in Calvary. If things had been a little worse, Marion County may not have had water service for weeks.
    In Bradfordsville, homes were overwhelmed by water. Fifteen houses had to be torn down, according to Mayor David Edelen.

  • There’s always room for improvement

    When it comes to grading Kentucky’s public elementary and secondary schools, what ultimately counts most is whether our graduating students are truly ready for college and a career.
    Over the last several years, one of the state’s newest agencies – the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics – has been helping measure our progress in this area. Its work is more than just a survey; it’s an in-depth look at an entire graduating class.

  • There’s always room for improvement

    When it comes to grading Kentucky’s public elementary and secondary schools, what ultimately counts most is whether our graduating students are truly ready for college and a career.
    Over the last several years, one of the state’s newest agencies – the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics – has been helping measure our progress in this area. Its work is more than just a survey; it’s an in-depth look at an entire graduating class.