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Today's Opinions

  • Kentucky budget deadline obligation of the job

    By The Kentucky New Era Editorial Board

    It’s a rare job that would pay someone to work extra days if they failed to meet a deadline that was agreed upon well in advance. But that’s the deal for members of the Kentucky General Assembly if they don’t reach an agreement soon on the state’s 2016-18 budget. They would come back for a special session called by the governor to finish their work — and do it at the expense of taxpayers.

  • Our work is not complete until a budget is signed into law

    This week, the General Assembly returns to the Capitol for a single day to wrap up the 2016 legislative session.
    While this time traditionally has been set aside just to consider whether the House and Senate should override any vetoes a governor might issue, we have begun in recent years to also use this time to vote on other bills that were unresolved before the veto recess. This year, the biggest of those is the state’s two-year budget.

  • Our work is not complete until a budget is signed into law

    This week, the General Assembly returns to the Capitol for a single day to wrap up the 2016 legislative session.
    While this time traditionally has been set aside just to consider whether the House and Senate should override any vetoes a governor might issue, we have begun in recent years to also use this time to vote on other bills that were unresolved before the veto recess. This year, the biggest of those is the state’s two-year budget.

  • Education cuts never heal

    At the end of a legislative session, months of preparation and weeks of debate give way to a handful of days where the General Assembly and governor decide what will become law and what will have to wait.
    It’s a predictably busy time, especially when the budget is in the mix during even-numbered years.

  • Education cuts never heal

    At the end of a legislative session, months of preparation and weeks of debate give way to a handful of days where the General Assembly and governor decide what will become law and what will have to wait.
    It’s a predictably busy time, especially when the budget is in the mix during even-numbered years.

  • The Senate’s goal is to cut state’s long-term debt

    Addressing Kentucky’s underfunded pension systems was the top priority in the Senate’s version of House Bill (HB) 303, the state’s two-year budget, which passed the Kentucky Senate on March 23.

  • The Senate’s goal is to cut state’s long-term debt

    Addressing Kentucky’s underfunded pension systems was the top priority in the Senate’s version of House Bill (HB) 303, the state’s two-year budget, which passed the Kentucky Senate on March 23.

  • Building your own robot

    By Ken Begley

    Hey, I’m not kidding with the title of this story.
    Just because you live in small town America do not think there aren’t some incredibly talented folks living all around you doing some unbelievable things.  
    I love this job! I get to meet them and hear their stories!
    Anyway, a friend of mine named Mark told me how his next door neighbor had spent the past five years working part-time on building his own robot. 
    What the heck?
    Mark asked me if I’d like to see it.