Today's Opinions

  • Back to school safety tips we can all use

    It is a busy time of year for Kentucky families as students get back into the routine of school with many after-school activities, like football and soccer, getting into full gear. I want to wish all the students, teachers and school staff a great year. With each new school year comes great opportunities and chances to achieve new levels of learning and great experience.

  • Morrows ride again

    You never forget the name of the person who almost killed your wife.
    I must first tell you, my need to fight injustice can sometimes come back to haunt me. In my last column, I told you the story about how some kid stole my bike and my wife’s bike when we were living in South Korea. Well, the truth is, I should have let them be. As it turned out, getting those bikes back would spell trouble for us. More so for my wife, Emily.

  • Kentucky is an iconic state

    When it comes to being home to icons known around the world, few states can compete with Kentucky.
    We have a derby that owns the first Saturday in May; a chicken restaurant chain that has grown from a single location in Corbin to more than 15,000 in 125 nations; and a cave so mammoth that it is longer than the combined lengths of the second- and third-longest on the record books. The six million-plus barrels of bourbon now resting in our warehouses, meanwhile, represent more than 90 percent of the world’s production.

  • Keep your family safe, happy and healthy

    Although summer break is coming to an end, summer weather—and hazards—will continue. However, there are a few things you can do to help keep your family safe, happy and healthy for the rest of the season, especially while enjoying the great outdoors.

  • The rewards of workforce development

    By Tommy Wheatley

    At the start of the summer of 1980, I was a college student looking forward to a seasonal job near Hardinsburg, Kentucky, my hometown. I was charged with overseeing a summer youth employment program, matching 16- to 21-year-old workers with non-profit employers.
    That summer, I first realized the impact the workforce development system has on individuals and our entire communities. But little did I know, the job was the start of my own lifelong career and passion.

  • The value of professional mentorship

    By Dr. Evelyn Ellis

    It’s been said that mentoring is a brain to pick, an ear to listen and a push in the right direction.
    In this column, I want to talk about the value of professional mentorship.  In my role with WKU Elizabethtown-Fort Knox and as a member of the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board, I’m charged with helping people succeed in their chosen career fields, from pursuing their education to connecting them with employers.

  • Summer program challenge our best and brightest

    Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.
    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.
    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.

  • Transparency is crucial for KRS

    In Kentucky, some bleed blue, others bleed red, and today, the Kentucky Retirement System (KRS) bleeds green. An article from the Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting on June 7 outlined how KRS had used contributions from current and future state employees to pay legal fees for the former KRS Board Chair in a lawsuit against Governor Matt Bevin.