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Features

  • The need has never been greater and it’s never been easier to make a difference in your community.  Here is your opportunity to make sure that nobody goes without such a basic necessity as a coat this winter.  

  • Kentucky State Police is preparing for Jan. 1, 2011, when they will begin issuing citations for violations of the texting law that went into effect July 15, 2010. The law (KRS 189.292) will prohibit drivers from texting while their vehicle is in motion.  
    For drivers who are under eighteen, the law (KRS 189.294) goes a step further by prohibiting both texting and cell phone use for this age group.
    Spokesperson for KSP, Lt. David Jude says that the new law was designed to place the drivers’ focus back on the road instead of an electronic device.

  • Inter-County Energy reminds customers to use portable generators as safely as possible in the event of a power outage. A portable generator can make life a lot easier, but if it’s used improperly, it can be very dangerous.
    Keep the following safety tips in mind when installing and using your generator.
    • If connecting the generator into the house wiring is necessary, first contact Inter-County Energy for information on code compliance, then have a qualified electrician hook up the standby electrical system.

  • In response to record numbers of reported pertussis cases, the Kentucky Department for Public Health is urging Kentuckians to make sure their families are protected against pertussis, commonly known as whooping cough, by maintaining immunity through vaccination.
    Cases reported statewide have increased from just 47 in 2007 to more than 250 in 2010 to date. This concerning upward trend has been recognized in areas across the United States.

  • Marion County farmers Curtis Jones from Loretto and Lu Ann Mattingly from Raywick were honored as two of the five winners in the 2010 Kentucky Farm Bureau Farmer Idea Exchange program. All five recipients of the award were recognized during the Dec. 2 general session of KFB’s annual meeting in Louisville.

  • Preliminary statistics indicate that 11 people died in nine separate crashes on Kentucky roadways from Monday, Nov. 29, through Sunday, Dec. 5, 2010.
    Ten of the crashes involved motor vehicles and four victims were not wearing seat belts. Single-fatality crashes occurred in Calloway, Carlisle, Fulton, Green, Laurel (two) and Spencer counties. The crashes in Carlisle and Laurel counties involved the suspected use of alcohol.

  • Three Excellence in Agriculture Awards were presented at the Young Farmer Luncheon held during the 91st Kentucky Farm Bureau annual meeting in Louisville.  In the ninth year of the awards program, Daniel and Sarah Mattingly, of Raywick, won top honors and will represent Kentucky in national competition at the American Farm Bureau Federation annual meeting, held in Atlanta, Ga, in January 2011.

  • A Nelson County artist has been chosen to have her art emblazoned on bottles of bourbon as part of a limited edition of Maker's Mark.

    Oil painter and landscape artist Mary Hagy's rendition of a winter scene at the Maker's Mark Distillery in Loretto was chosen to grace the label of a limited batch of 150,000 bottles of the bourbon.

  • By Monica Ruehling

    Anniversaries are a time to celebrate; a time to think about the successes of the past years, to analyze strengths found, rejoice in bonds made, and to dream about the future.
    November marks the 10th anniversary of the National Family Caregiver Support Program, created in November 2000 by an amendment to the Older Americans Act.
    It is fitting this month is also designated as National Family Caregiver Month and when the NFCSP was created.

  • By Kay Turpin

    Dogs and cold weather - that means its time to take stock of your dog’s outdoor shelter. You may have wondered if dogs get cold in the winter.
    The short answer is yes, some breeds more so than others.
    So, in order to protect our best friends, let’s start with the top priority, which is to make sure Rover has a doghouse where he will be warm and sheltered against the weather.

  • Preliminary statistics indicate that nine people died in eight separate crashes on Kentucky roadways during the Thanksgiving holiday enforcement period (Wednesday, Nov. 24, through Sunday, Nov. 28, 2010). Last year there were eight highway fatalities during the same time period.
    All of the crashes involved motor vehicles and four victims were not wearing seat belts. Single-fatality crashes occurred in Hancock, Marshall (two), Owsley, Rowan, Shelby and Trigg counties. The crashes in Marshall and Owsley counties involved the suspected use of alcohol.

  • As the methods for illegally obtaining the ingrediants to create methamphetamine evolve, it becomes easier to manufacture meth and law enforcement is seeing a spike in meth lab incidents.  Kentucky State Police (KSP) released the October methamphetamine lab statistics today and the number indicates an all-time high in the Commonwealth.
    KSP reports that there were 111 meth labs found during the month of October, exceeding all previous monthly totals, bringing the 2010 statewide total to 919.

  • More than 1,300 Kentucky Farm Bureau members from across the state will gather for the organization’s 91st annual meeting Dec. 1-4 at the Galt House Hotel in Louisville. Delegates from all of Kentucky’s 120 counties will assemble for the four-day event to participate in committee meetings, business sessions, award presentations, officer elections and to finalize 2011 priority issues and policy revisions.

  • According to the American Automobile Association, approximately 39.7 million motorists will hit the road during the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, a 12 percent increase from 2009.

  • Back in the "olden" days when I was a trick-or-treater on Halloween, we got homemade treats most of the time. We probably didn't appreciate it then, but we were sure lucky. We would go door-to-door in my very small town, filling up our bags with smaller bags of caramel corn, peanut butter candy, and something we called "cracker fudge." Only the really little kids were accompanied by parents. Most of us were on our own, and we knew the best houses to go to for the really good stuff.