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Opinion

  • Editor’s note: This editorial was published recently in The Advocate-Messenger in Danville. It’s being reprinted with permission through the Kentucky Press News Service.

  • I love this time of year.
    People seem happier.
    Food tastes better.
    Work seems a little less stressful.
    (The election is over. Need I say more?)
    But, there is one thing I really dislike about the holiday season - the stress we inflict on ourselves about buying Christmas gifts.
    Why do we put so much pressure on ourselves? Why do we care so much? What has created this materialistic monster that seems to take over the real meaning of the season? Our society is so obsessed with things, money, buying, etc.

  • By Davette B. Swiney

    Kecha Richardson wants what any loving parent wants. She wants to provide for her children, and she wants to set an example that gives them the confidence and drive to find their own success.
    That common dream can’t begin to take shape for Kecha without self-sustaining employment. Often there are barriers to entering or progressing in the workforce.

  • It may not have generated much publicity, but Kentucky’s economy hit a high-water mark in October, when our civilian labor force saw its biggest one-month gain in at least 40 years. It grew by almost 15,000 during those 31 days, putting us just shy of two million people who are either working or actively looking for a job.

  • I have been immersed in American history lately, particularly with the World War II era. I can’t tell you why, to be perfectly honest. Maybe the current political climate has inspired me to study how we got here. Perhaps I long for a different time than the one in which I live.
    Honestly, though, I think I am simply in awe of the people who came before us, paving the way for a world where we can be free.

  • This week, our families and friends will sit down at the dinner table to celebrate Thanksgiving, the oldest of the American-based holidays.

    Nearly 400 years have passed since the most famous of these harvest feasts was held by the Pilgrims and Native Americans.  It didn’t become the holiday we recognize today, though, until President Washington and then President Lincoln helped solidify its place on the calendar, which Congress finalized in the 1940s by declaring it to always be on the fourth Thursday of November.

  • The hustle and bustle of the winter holidays is well underway and the cool crispness of the autumn air is turning towards winter frost. Even as the weather changes and the holiday season comes upon us, we are still busy in Frankfort with interim joint committee meetings as well as planning for the 2017 session of the General Assembly.

  • I might not be married.
    I probably am. But Emily and I aren’t exactly sure.
    Don’t get me wrong, we said our vows before God and a crowd of witnesses. We sealed our promises with a kiss. The music played. People cheered. But a small discovery we made about three years ago might mean the two of us didn’t quite tie the knot as recognized by the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
    Emily was the most beautiful bride I had ever seen. Neither one of us could keep the tears in as she walked down the aisle toward me.

  • Other than during a rare boil-water advisory, most of us don’t think twice when we turn on the faucet. We just expect clean and plentiful water to be there.
    For about 95 percent of Kentuckians, that’s exactly what we get each and every day from the 400-plus public and community water systems that serve the commonwealth. These systems meet or exceed health-based standards at an incredible rate of 99.73 percent.

  • By G.B. Dixon

  • Let's hope our fragile democracy can survive the election of Trump. I'm scared to death we will never fully recover from this.
    President-elect Trump is ignorant of even the most basic tenets of our Constitution, nor does he appear to understand how the three branches of government work as checks and balances.

  • I am pleased to share that two fundraisers put on by my family in support of Hosparus Green River raised a total of $20,000 for local hospice patients and families.
    In 2005, my brother Gerald Mattingly lost his battle with cancer. As a way to honor his memory and his life, my family and I decided to host a charity golf scramble to give back. The 10th annual Gerald Mattingly Golf Scramble was held last month at Lebanon Country Club, and I want to personally thank the 96 golfers who came out to support hospice care on a dreary October day.

  • After the hubbub of Halloween and Election Day, we often miss one very important day to this nation — Veterans Day on Nov. 11. We celebrate the lives of those who have given so much for our country and who are still giving so much. Veterans Day was formerly known as Armistice Day, so named because at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918, the Armistice with Germany went into effect, ending the dominant hostilities of World War I.

  • When I got out of the car, I wasn’t sure what to expect. The ground was soft and muddy everywhere I stepped. I couldn’t help but notice the signs posted all over the property: We (heart) collies, or COLLIE CROSSING or simply a silhouette of the four-legged animal with a thick neck of hair and a long snout.
    I was there to buy a dog.

  • By Mo Miller

    Entrepreneurs are often and rightfully called the backbone of our economy. Most businesses in our region and across the county are small businesses, and they create nearly two of every three new jobs. As importantly, our communities’ entrepreneurs prove time and again that hard working, determined people can build a better life for themselves and their families.

  • “All forces in the world are not so powerful as an idea whose time has come.”
    - Victor Hugo

  • When I graduated with a degree in journalism back in 2009, it wasn’t exactly my dream to be loading and unloading trucks full of Pepsi bottles and shelving them in coolers throughout Western Kentucky’s gas stations and grocery stores. The pay was terrible and the hours were long. It didn’t help that everyone I worked with was actively looking for a way out.
    I spent whatever free time I had sending resume-after-resume to just about any newspaper that was hiring. It didn’t matter how far away.

  • If you are a veteran, transitioning service member or military spouse and have an idea for a new product or service, get ready to pitch your business to the Sharks of the Heartland.

  • Change is inevitable.
    Change can be difficult.
    Change can also be a very good thing.
    But, there is a certain comfort in keeping things the same. It’s a paradox, really. Many are resistant to change, but change is the only way we can grow, the only way we can advance.
    And there is one inevitable truth: change happens whether we want it to or not.
    Take Marion County Public Schools, for instance.