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Opinion

  • By Ken Begley
    Guest columnist

    I’ve served on active duty and the Army Reserve for 42 years as an enlisted man in a wide variety of units and leadership positions. My time is almost over as I will be retired at the end of October when I reach 60.
    It’s been interesting, fun, scary at times, and most of all rewarding.
    My deepest regret is not taking Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) as a cadet when I was in college and becoming an officer in the U.S. Army. I feel I could have done so much more if I had.

  • By Kim Huston

    Bourbon is booming, and this week we’ll see further evidence of that as Bardstown - the Bourbon Capital of the World - hosts the Kentucky Bourbon Festival. In 2016, 53,000 people from 44 states as well as the District of Columbia and 14 different countries attended the festival, and we are looking forward to an even more successful 2017 festival.

  • By Stanley Gaddie
    Guest columnist

  • The Loretto Community is deeply disappointed and angered by the decision of the Trump administration to suspend the DACA Executive Order and break our nation’s promise to 800,000 young Dreamers. Loretto urges congressional passage of the bi-partisan DREAM Act, which would convert DACA – the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Executive Order, issued by President Obama and yesterday suspended by the Trump administration – into federal law.

  • Family is forever
    At the Village of Lebanon Assisted Living we are one big family. When moving a loved one into an assisted living community, one important word that comes to mind is “trust.“ You want the peace of mind that your loved one will receive the utmost care by professionals who will treat them like their own family. At Village of Lebanon Assisted Living, we could not take this responsibility more seriously.

  • Five out of seven days a week, my alarm sounds at 4 a.m.
    Yes, 4 a.m.
    No, I don’t have cows to milk or livestock to feed.
    I willingly choose to get up really early, put on my gym clothes, take the dogs out to do their business, and then drive to Fitness One in Lebanon.
    You would think that at such an early hour the gym would be empty, but that’s not the case.
    I can always expect “the regulars” to be there.
    Who are “the regulars?”
    Oh, I’m glad you asked.

  • In a recent announcement from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), certain vapor product compliance deadlines will be extended to 2022. Although this appears to be a victory for the vape industry, it is not the end of the uphill vape ban battle.
    The good news is that Congress is still currently considering H.R. 1136, the FDA Deeming Authority Clarification Act of 2017. This law would provide sensible regulations that allow a better FDA approval process for existing and future products.

  • By State Rep. Brandon Reed

    The independent consulting group, PFM, commissioned by the state to examine our pension problems, released their long-awaited report on Aug. 28. In the midst of much news reporting and information being pushed, it is important to note that the report only lists PFM’s proposals, and any legislative action will not mirror the full recommendations.

  • Mesothelioma Awareness Day in Kentucky

  • By Katherine L. Stone, Ph.D. and Laura Bonzo-Sims, Ed.D.

  • By Megan Stith

    We’ve all had a day when something upset our pre-work routine. It could have been a flat tire, a child with a sudden fever and, hence, no daycare option, or a power outage that knocked out your alarm clock and every appliance in the kitchen. Those are bad days, to say the least, even for those of us who have flexibility and solid support systems.

  • Summer is winding down and kids are heading back to school, but the members of the Kentucky General Assembly are still working on your behalf in Frankfort attending Interim Joint Committees. These committees bring together members of the Kentucky House and Senate to collaborate on policy ideas and discuss bills for future sessions. The interim is also a time for us, the members of the General Assembly, to hear from different offices and branches of government to keep them accountable to you, the taxpayer.

  • Masterson continues to support Loretto Child Care Center

  • Gov. Bevin,

    In 2015, you wrote an email to a reporter who was working for WAVE 3 applauding the decision by then-South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley to remove the Confederate battle flag from The Palmetto State’s capitol grounds.
    In that email, you wrote, “... I think it would be equally appropriate for Kentucky to remove the Jefferson Davis statue from our capitol. It is important never to forget our history, but parts of our history are more appropriately displayed in museums, not on government property.”
    What happened to you?

  • Sometimes, I think my son has a sixth sense.
    A couple of weeks ago – before groups of white supremacists held violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia – my son asked me to order a special t-shirt for him.
    My 11-year-old has suddenly become very interested in his wardrobe, and I assumed the t-shirt he wanted was going to be one promoting Nike, Steph Curry or some other athletic company, person or product.
    But, I was very wrong.
    The simple black t-shirt had the following question printed on the front:

  • In last week’s news story regarding Andrew Lanham being sentenced to 10 years in prison for robbing US Bank in Loretto, it stated that court documents stated that Lanham had been violating the law since the age of 16. Actually, that is incorrect.
    The document actually said that Lanham had been working since the age of 16. We regret the mistake. Publisher Stevie Lowery misread the judge’s handwriting, and she apologizes to the Lanham family for the mistake. It completely was unintentional.
     

  • The Kentucky Standard

    Most Americans would likely agree that federal laws and policies should not harm families.
    But that is exactly what is taking place with the federal government’s emphasis on deporting undocumented immigrants, as illustrated by a Bardstown man’s forced removal to Mexico late last month.

  • Recently the descendants of Joseph Wayne and Amelia Bradshaw Wayne gathered in Marion County from coast to coast. Wanting to reconnect to their family history, we toured Ryder and Calvary cemeteries, the homes at Shuck and Mulberry in Lebanon and the Bradshaw farm off Three Pines Road along the Rolling Fork River. The farm is now owned by Alan Corbett.

  • By Terri Thomas

    So many young adults have sincere interests in developing the skills they need to start a career in one of our region’s thriving industries. Too often, though, these job seekers are discouraged because they don’t think they can afford the training needed to qualify for high paying, in-demand jobs.