.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • It's time for my annual attempt at a last-minute gift guide. Thankfully, for the people on my admittedly short list, I've already got everything.
    Well, except for one thing.
    OK, more than one thing.
    So, maybe I don't have all of my gifts yet — but this isn't about me. It's about helping those of you still scrambling for ideas.
    Here are my suggestions for this year:

  • With only about a week until Christmas, the opportunities to buy gifts is nearing a critical point for those who haven’t completed their shopping.
    If you’re among those still searching for ideas, one possible solution is to buy something produced locally. Governor Beshear, in fact, has proclaimed December to be “Give a Gift Made in Kentucky Month,” which is highlighting the artists and businesses across the commonwealth that offer something rare if not unique.

  • Do you believe in magic?
    I’ve always been a skeptic, but recently I’ve had the pleasure of spending several hours watching Santa Claus delight children at Dickens Christmas and meet and greet children on Main Street in Lebanon.
    What I witnessed was truly magical.

  • Missed opportunity
    Once again, the Marion County school board has “dropped the ball.” On the heels of all the recent discord between the board and the community, the board was completely “tone deaf” to the possibility of beginning to heal this rift.

  • A few weeks from now, the General Assembly will return to the Capitol as it does each January to begin a new legislative session. Since this will take place in an odd-numbered year, it will only last for 30 working days, and the first four of those will be dedicated to electing House and Senate leaders and establishing most of the chambers’ committees for the next two years. Bills and resolutions will be considered in February and March, but the state’s budget will not be one of them, since that is completed in even-numbered years.

  • By Carter Dyson
    One Stop Director for Kentucky Career Center

  • As students near the end of the semester, they are invariably starting to think about the grades that will determine whether their Christmas break is actually a joyous one.
    For Kentucky’s educational system, our “report cards,” so to speak, have already arrived. They came earlier this fall from the Prichard Committee for Academic Excellence, a non-profit organization that has been a driving force behind education reform since the 1980s, and the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE).

  • By Jama Watts
    Guest columnist

    One of the collections myself and our patrons love perusing in the genealogy room at the Marion County Public Library is our selection of local yearbooks. We have an array of schools available, from St. Augustine, Lebanon Junior High, Lebanon High and Marion County High School. 
    Want to see this genealogist with some ginormous hair? How about some styles from the 1970s? Can’t remember that person’s name you ran into on the street? We can help!

  • The Marion County school board voted at its Nov. 25 meeting to hold its regular meetings on Thursdays at 4 p.m. for 2015. Jerry Evans cast the only opposing vote and was the only board member who advocated on behalf of his constituents for more convenient public access. It is reasonable to consider the contempt that this administration has for the public they purport to serve.

  • By the Frankfort State Journal

    Here’s our opinion on this day: People need to make an effort to get along at least for the month of December.
    After that, could be they’ll discover it feels pretty good, that it’s better to say nice things rather than mean things, think good thoughts instead of bad, give and not worry about getting … and it just might be something that would work in the new year, too.

  • Kentucky New Era

  • By Chip Hutcheson
    Times Leader

    Since we’re a little more than a month away from the end of the year, it’s not surprising that some of those year-end stories are beginning to hit the news.

  • Last month, Village of Lebanon marked a milestone of sorts. Four of its residents have reached at least 100 years old, and two of those residents, Ethel Mae Bradshaw and Chloe Mattingly, shared some thoughts about their century on Earth.

    One hundred years ago, Woodrow Wilson was the President of the United States. Charlie Chaplin's movie "The Tramp" was released. The world's first successful blood transfusion took place in Brussels.

  • A cutline on page B1 of the Nov. 12 edition incorrectly identified Katie Overstreet as Kaylee Wheatley.

    Due to a reporter’s error, a mistake was published in the Nov. 19 article, “School board looks to cut energy use, costs.” An item listed in other business should have read that the Marion County Board of Education approved shortened school days for three students in the Exceptional Child Education program.

    The story mistakenly read that the board approved three shortened school days. We apologize for any confusion. 

  • Runner’s high: a feeling of euphoria that is experienced by some individuals engaged in strenuous running, which is associated with the release of endorphins by the brain.

    I’ve experienced the “runner’s high” more times than I can count. 

    It’s real. And it’s fantastic.

  •  By Patricia Krausman

    University of Kentucky Small Business Development Center Director

    While the Thanksgiving Day rush for door buster deals may focus on national stores, small businesses are certainly a big part of the holiday shopping mix. 

  •  While the Fourth of July is understandably the most American holiday, Thanksgiving can at least lay claim to being the first.

    Its origin, as even our youngest students can tell us, began long before our independence, and we’re now just seven years away from the 400th anniversary of when the Pilgrims and Native Americans held a three-day feast.

  • Last week, the Department of Education released its latest annual report on school safety, a study that gives the public a truly comprehensive look at the discipline issues our students, teachers, staff and administrators face.
    Overall, the news is good. Nearly 90 percent of the 660,000 students who attend public schools were not involved in any infractions in 2013-14, and of the remainder, only a small percentage was engaged in violent behavior.