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Opinion

  • By State Rep. Brandon Reed
     
    For the first time since 1921, Republicans took control of the Kentucky House of Representatives, making our first week back to Frankfort a historic one. We have been hard at work doing exactly what the voters of Kentucky sent us to Frankfort to accomplish. The result of this was an extremely productive first week of the 2017 session, in which priority bills to improve the economy, protect life, and make government more accountable passed through the General Assembly.

  • Words, when strung together carefully and creatively, can touch a person’s soul.
    At least, that’s been my experience.

  • When you’re a kid, you have this vision of what being an adult is like. Anyone older than 20 looks ancient. Anyone older than 40 has to be a grandparent. Then, when you actually become an adult, you start to wonder if you missed the switch somehow.
    At what point did I stop being a kid and start being an adult?

  • I'm writing to express my disappointment with Senator Higdon's support of the Right to Work bill. I'm in complete agreement with Vincent Ballard's letter of Jan. 11, but I can't say I'm surprised by Sen. Higdon's action. After all, that is what Republicans do, putting party politics ahead of the interests of the middle class. Kentucky will now join the likes of Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia, Arkansas and Louisiana in a race to the bottom thanks to our governor, senate and congress.
    Ed Heckel

  • By Carole Logsdon

    Have you heard the news? The Lincoln Trail Region is getting a new multiplex. You will no longer have to travel to larger metropolitan areas to catch a show in a modern, state of the art theater. It will create jobs and is certainly economic development activity, but in addition to that, this theater will enhance our region’s quality of place.

  • When I was younger, I had to rely on glasses. It was so bad that I couldn’t see three feet in front of my face. Colors merged together like a Jackson Pollack painting. You could forget road signs, heck, you could forget the dashboard clock for that matter. Without my glasses, I was pretty much useless.

  • By Terri Thomas

    A new year has come, and for many employees and job seekers, it’s the perfect time to step back and consider their career paths and plans. As many will look to make 2017 a great work year or even make concrete resolutions to get a new job, earn a promotion or start training for an in-demand career, the staff at Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail offers the following strategies to help strengthen your 2017 career outlook.

    Research the job market

  • To say that your recent vote to approve for Right to Work and prevailing wage legislation is disheartening would be an understatement. Your vote was a figurative slap in the face of the hard working people you have sworn to represent. Instead of standing up for the men and women of your district, and state, you chose to follow party lines. It’s as if you forgot how many in your district work at union shops. Ones like the distilleries, Ford, G.E. and construction companies.

  • “No, I’m not from around here.” I frequently have to respond to the question about my lack of central Kentucky accent. And that is why the column “Be more kind” by Stevie Lowery touched me so deeply. Having spent nearly all my years in situations during education, career and even choices where I live, in non-traditional female roles, I have examples beyond number of feeling isolated and not embraced or even included. It is not easy moving to a small town where families have lived for generations and myself and my husband a mere ten years.

  • Sometimes the smallest expression or act of kindness can literally save a life.
    Sunday I was watching one of my favorite shows, CBS Sunday Morning, and there was a story about an 82-year-old widower in Georgia whose life was changed by a little girl at a grocery store. Her innocent, loving expression of kindness gave him a reason to live again.
    Dan Peterson fell into a deep depression after his wife, Mary, died. He admitted that after her death, he was just waiting to die.
    Until he met Nora Wood.

  • I don’t know about the rest of you, but 2016 has been a year of extremes for me. To quote Charles Dickens, “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.”
    This year, I was a part-time garbage man trying to thaw the icicles from my eyelashes, and now I am a full-time journalist, cozy in my office with a hot mug of coffee.
    It’s sort of a representation of how this year has been. The first half of 2016 was the complete opposite of the second half.

  • Good news.
    While bad news seems to get more attention (and sell more newspapers), I love reporting good news.

  • It’s not Christmas Day yet, and I’ve already started on my list of New Year’s resolutions.
    Yeah, yeah… I know what you’re thinking… I can hear you muttering under your breath. “Oh, great. Here she goes with her motivational mumbo jumbo. Blah, blah, blah. Gag.”
    First of all, that’s not nice.
    Second of all, this is actually new for me.

  • I didn’t know what I was getting myself into when I put on the big red suit. I didn’t know the responsibility. The power.
    I was a poor college kid looking for an extra few bucks for the holidays and along came my then girlfriend, Emily, with a job opportunity. Somehow, she had connections with Santa’s workshop at the Paducah Mall and they were desperate for a Santa Claus.

  • During the holidays, most of us probably don’t give much thought to the origin of the traditions common during this time of year. We put up Christmas trees, take our children to see Santa and sing carols because that’s what we’ve done for generations.

  • By CARTER DYSON

    When I tell people I work for the Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail, I’m often rewarded by their familiarity with the organization’s services. However, I am occasionally met with a look of uncertainty, and it’s almost always because someone has long referred to the career center as the unemployment office.
    While unemployment insurance assistance is a vital service to many of the job seekers who visit our center, it is just one of the many offerings available.

  • Memories are a funny thing. They can evoke positive and negative emotions alike. They make us laugh, they make us cry. Sometimes they surprise us when we realize they have been locked away in the vault of our minds, only to be freed by a story from your parents or grandparents, or by a smell in the air, or a sound you haven’t heard since you were a child.

  • For more than a quarter-century now, Kentucky Youth Advocates has taken an in-depth look at the well-being of the commonwealth’s children, giving us a valuable year-to-year comparison in such critical areas as health, education and economic security.

  • There’s nothing like spending the holidays on the back of a garbage truck, the wind forming icicles in my hair, the stench of goodness-knows-what filling my nostrils. It’s particularly a good workout the week after Thanksgiving when people start throwing away all of their leftovers, the bags often weighing more than I do.

  • Many of you may recall an issue the Kentucky General Assembly discussed in the 2016 Session, known as “REAL ID,” which requires Kentucky to meet modern federal regulation standards on the issuance of identification. Known as Senate Bill (SB) 245 in the 2016 session, the bill passed both the Senate and the House but was ultimately vetoed by Governor Bevin because of concerns will the bill’s future implications.