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Opinion

  • By Mo Miller

    Entrepreneurs are often and rightfully called the backbone of our economy. Most businesses in our region and across the county are small businesses, and they create nearly two of every three new jobs. As importantly, our communities’ entrepreneurs prove time and again that hard working, determined people can build a better life for themselves and their families.

  • “All forces in the world are not so powerful as an idea whose time has come.”
    - Victor Hugo

  • When I graduated with a degree in journalism back in 2009, it wasn’t exactly my dream to be loading and unloading trucks full of Pepsi bottles and shelving them in coolers throughout Western Kentucky’s gas stations and grocery stores. The pay was terrible and the hours were long. It didn’t help that everyone I worked with was actively looking for a way out.
    I spent whatever free time I had sending resume-after-resume to just about any newspaper that was hiring. It didn’t matter how far away.

  • If you are a veteran, transitioning service member or military spouse and have an idea for a new product or service, get ready to pitch your business to the Sharks of the Heartland.

  • Change is inevitable.
    Change can be difficult.
    Change can also be a very good thing.
    But, there is a certain comfort in keeping things the same. It’s a paradox, really. Many are resistant to change, but change is the only way we can grow, the only way we can advance.
    And there is one inevitable truth: change happens whether we want it to or not.
    Take Marion County Public Schools, for instance.

  • By Harry VanWhy

    A couple of weeks ago my granddaughter Vanessa invited me to have lunch with her for book fair week at Glasscock Elementary School. I was very proud that she wanted me to visit her at her school (even though I knew the purpose was to buy her a new book from the book fair!) During my visit there however it became quite apparent to me how badly her school needed some repair and maintenance attention.

  • By Bill Adams, Ph.D

  • By Kurt and Amy Mattingly

    We are Marion County, born and raised. We are products of the Marion County schools and community. We moved away for a brief period to obtain degrees, then returned home to marry, work and raise a family. We believe in Marion County for our futures, for our schools, and for our children. Now it’s Marion County’s turn to believe in us.

  • By Joe F. Mattingly

    I was just going through the bills I’ve gotten last week that I put in a stack as the week goes and sit down on Thursday nights and write out some checks and get in the mail on Fridays. Believe me when I tell you I know what tight times are. I’ve been self-employed now for 40 years and have had to use some inventive money management techniques to get bills paid, make payrolls, and try to acquire additional properties of which I can use to finance my retirement at some point in time.  

  • By Tara Tatum

  • On Nov. 8, we have a chance to invest in the future of our greatest resource – our children and grandchildren – all youth of Marion County.
    Education pays in so many ways as it prepares our students for job opportunities and prosperity.
    Four good reasons to support the nickel tax are:
    1. It is earmarked only for facility improvement.
    2. It is matched dollar for dollar through the state government.
    3. It replaces the 4 percent tax increase allowed by law, thus reducing the net financial burden of the county’s taxpayers.

  • One of the first representatives I got to know when I was sworn in as a state representative in 2003 was Representative Jamie Comer. Jamie was the youngest member of the General Assembly and had established himself as a leader in the House of Representatives. I have been very thankful over the years that Jamie helped me in those early years of my newly elected position.

  • Memories of my past flash in front of my eyes every few seconds as I walk around my old house in Marion, Kentucky. The country home is surrounded by fields and woods where I spent most of my youth. So little has changed, yet everything is different.
    As groups of people carry out couches, tables and boxes, I can’t help but remember the day that groups of people (some of them the same individuals) were carrying those items into the house. That was 16 years ago, almost to the date.
    Everything is the same, yet everything is different.

  • The weather is cooling down and we are quickly approaching the holiday season with Halloween right around the corner. Along with attending all sorts of fall festivities and celebrations, children have begun carefully selecting their next costume for trick-or-treating. And while this should always be a family event, there are extra ways to keep your child safe.
    The American Academy of Pediatrics offers some great tips for safe Halloween fun:

  • By Terri Thomas

    The fifth annual national Manufacturing Day was Oct. 7, and manufacturing and the sector’s career opportunities were in the spotlight. Local communities across the country have designated a day, a week or the entire month as a time to recognize and promote the interesting, innovative and rewarding careers found in manufacturing facilities.

  • By LISA WILLIAMS BOONE

    Throughout the Lincoln Trail region, you’ll find strong connections to our nation’s military and a deep appreciation for the men and women who serve our country. At the same time, ours is a region that strongly supports entrepreneurship and small businesses. It’s no surprise that so many veterans have chosen to start businesses in Central Kentucky.

  • I didn’t have a thermometer, but the temperature under the blazing sun had to be more than 100 degrees. Looking to my left and right, all I could see was sand and dried bushes for miles and miles. The road behind and in front of me blurred in the distance, the type of blur you see when you look just inches above a roaring fire. This whole place felt like it was on fire. After all, we were stuck in the California desert.

  • By David Chavern
    President and CEO of News Media Alliance

    Imagine waking up in a world without newspapers.
    “Ha!” You say, “I haven’t gotten a newspaper in years.”
    But I’m not talking about just the paper delivered by carriers or the postal service. I’m talking about the news online, the links on social media, the email newsletter, the source cited in the television broadcast and the push notification on your phone. The word newspaper no longer reflects the media industry encompassed by the word.

  • By Layne Bruce
    Several years ago cyberspace was frenzied over many popular websites going dark for 24 hours to protest a federal bill meant to crack down on video piracy.
    The Stop Online Piracy Act – or SOPA – was a controversial and perhaps misguided effort championed by the Motion Picture Association of America to end illegal online sharing of copyrighted material, primarily movies and music.