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Opinion

  • Masterson continues to support Loretto Child Care Center

  • Gov. Bevin,

    In 2015, you wrote an email to a reporter who was working for WAVE 3 applauding the decision by then-South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley to remove the Confederate battle flag from The Palmetto State’s capitol grounds.
    In that email, you wrote, “... I think it would be equally appropriate for Kentucky to remove the Jefferson Davis statue from our capitol. It is important never to forget our history, but parts of our history are more appropriately displayed in museums, not on government property.”
    What happened to you?

  • Sometimes, I think my son has a sixth sense.
    A couple of weeks ago – before groups of white supremacists held violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia – my son asked me to order a special t-shirt for him.
    My 11-year-old has suddenly become very interested in his wardrobe, and I assumed the t-shirt he wanted was going to be one promoting Nike, Steph Curry or some other athletic company, person or product.
    But, I was very wrong.
    The simple black t-shirt had the following question printed on the front:

  • In last week’s news story regarding Andrew Lanham being sentenced to 10 years in prison for robbing US Bank in Loretto, it stated that court documents stated that Lanham had been violating the law since the age of 16. Actually, that is incorrect.
    The document actually said that Lanham had been working since the age of 16. We regret the mistake. Publisher Stevie Lowery misread the judge’s handwriting, and she apologizes to the Lanham family for the mistake. It completely was unintentional.
     

  • The Kentucky Standard

    Most Americans would likely agree that federal laws and policies should not harm families.
    But that is exactly what is taking place with the federal government’s emphasis on deporting undocumented immigrants, as illustrated by a Bardstown man’s forced removal to Mexico late last month.

  • Recently the descendants of Joseph Wayne and Amelia Bradshaw Wayne gathered in Marion County from coast to coast. Wanting to reconnect to their family history, we toured Ryder and Calvary cemeteries, the homes at Shuck and Mulberry in Lebanon and the Bradshaw farm off Three Pines Road along the Rolling Fork River. The farm is now owned by Alan Corbett.

  • By Terri Thomas

    So many young adults have sincere interests in developing the skills they need to start a career in one of our region’s thriving industries. Too often, though, these job seekers are discouraged because they don’t think they can afford the training needed to qualify for high paying, in-demand jobs.

  • Last year, I published a column about summer safety and I wanted to bring it up again this year. Although many children will be back in school within the month, the summer heat and fun will continue and with it, the chance for injuries and sicknesses that can easily be prevented. Take a moment to review these tips to ensure your family’s safety.

  • By Katherine L. Stone, Ph.D. and Laura Bonzo-Sims, Ed.D.

  • The Kentucky Standard

    Isaiah House is the largest faith-based or “Christ-centered” drug treatment and rehab program in Kentucky and serves the entire state.

  • By Kenny Rambo

    Did you know by 2020 millennials will make-up 50 percent or more of the workforce? It is an alarming statistic if you buy into the negative stereotypes that exist around this generation, born between 1977 and 1995.

  • Good deed doesn’t go unnoticed

  • By Dr. Patrick J. Withrow

    What I am referring to, sadly, are the horrible chronic diseases and premature deaths caused by Kentuckians using tobacco products.
    Per Capita, Kentucky ranks No. 1 in cigarette consumption of all 50 states and leads the nation in lung cancer deaths. One-third of all cancer deaths in Kentucky are related to tobacco. The No. 1 killer of women is heart attack and stroke and of men, cancer; most are attributable to tobacco. Kentucky leads the nation by far in pregnant women who smoke (26.5 percent vs. 10.7 percent).  

  • By Lisa Boone

    Months ago, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board set out to develop a thoughtful strategic plan that not only assures our regional workforce development system is responsive to the needs of job seekers and employers but also addressed the system’s change in focus as laid out by the federal Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act.

  • Although I live in Indiana, I would like to write a letter about Johnny 
    Boone.
    I do not feel that Johnny Boone should have to serve any time in prison. He 
    did not murder anyone. He is not a violent individual. He did a lot of good 
    for people in both Washington and Marion counties in Kentucky. Why is the 
    Commonwealth of Kentucky and the U.S. government spending millions of dollars 
    to prosecute and imprison a man who is not a threat to anyone?

  • By State Rep. Brandon Reed
     
    The Fourth of July is a time that represents everything that is fundamentally great about America: the freedom and inalienable rights that this nation was founded upon.

  • By Dr. Juston Pate

    Employers in high-demand industries across our region are facing the same challenge. They are struggling to find the skilled employees they need to replenish an aging workforce, grow their businesses and remain globally competitive. At the same time, many Central Kentuckians with the potential to succeed in our region’s growing career fields are held back by the financial burden of continuing their education.

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