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Opinion

  • Imagine for a moment that you have just been released from jail. You’re carrying a plastic bag with a change of underwear, socks and a toothbrush. Your pockets are empty. Your wallet would be, too, if you owned one. You have no family. The friends you have are still doing drugs. You know if you go to them you will be tempted by your previous addiction. But you’ve changed. You’re trying to better yourself. You don’t want to fall back into those old habits.  

  • Have you ever had a teenager screaming and cursing in your face, throwing things as he stormed through the house? Breaking cabinets? Kicking in doors? Have you ever had to watch a teenager scream and curse at your spouse and you weren’t allowed to do anything about it?
    It’s tough to deal with, let me tell you.

  • By Sister Claire McGowan, OP
    Guest columnist

  • About a decade ago, Kentucky started to see a welcome trend as the number of highway fatalities began a steady decline. Totals that regularly exceeded 900 a year before 2007 dropped to 638 in 2013, a figure not seen in the commonwealth since the 1940s.
    Unfortunately, that was as low as it would go. The number of fatalities on our roads last year was almost a fifth higher than the benchmark set just two years earlier, and through the first seven-plus months of this year, it’s eight percent ahead of where it was last August.

  • There is an unseen enemy attacking Americans today. They hide away in some dingy office in a different country. They are smart. They know exactly what to do and who to target. These enemies are the pirates of our homes, the digital pickpockets who can get your entire fortune if you allow them to dig deep enough. They are scammers.
    I don’t really know a better word for them. Perhaps: sleaze-buckets? Scum-suckers? Other words I’m not allowed to put into print?
    For consistency’s sake, we will stick with scammers.

  • Trump the Terrible. That's my nickname for this terrible person, and horrible candidate for president. I cringe at the very reality that he is actually running for office. Trump's behavior is utterly indefensible; yet Republicans continue to defend his obnoxious, ignorant, verbally abusive, disrespectful behavior.
    "God help us" as independent, former New York City Mayor Mr. Bloomberg said at the Democratic National Convention, with regard to his bad business practices.

  • By Jerisia Lamons

  • Kentucky received some welcome news last month when a national study found that no state had a smaller gap when comparing the high school graduation rates of students from low- and higher-income families. The average gap across the country stands at 15 percent, but it’s just one percent here in the commonwealth. In fact, our low-income students graduate at a higher rate than the overall national average, something only five other states can say.

  • By Derrick Ramsey

    Across Kentucky, many employers continue to battle a shortage of skilled tradespeople combined with the challenges of replenishing an aging workforce. Simultaneously, more and more students are considering the most affordable and efficient path to a high-paying career.

  • The Girls on the Run program changed Brianna Mattingly’s life.
    Mattingly, 13, was one of nine girls in Marion County's inaugural class of Girls on the Run at A.C. Glasscock Elementary School in 2011.
    At the time, she was a shy nine-year-old who lacked self-confidence.
    I remember watching her during our Girls on the Run activities and workouts. I could tell she was special, but it was obvious she didn’t believe in herself.

  • For the last six years, my wife and I have lived relatively in seclusion. In Georgia, we were outsiders – people from the North who didn’t know a blessed thing about the South. Never would as far as they were concerned.

  • It’s still a while down the road, but the year 2033 will be a pivotal one for our country, because that’s when U.S. Census Bureau projects there will be more citizens over the age of 65 than under the age of 18.
    It’s not a surprising trend, of course, given the gains we have made in medicine, technology and a greater focus on eating right and exercising. From a historical perspective, however, it’s a relatively new phenomenon. A century ago, less than five percent of our citizens were older than 65; by 2040, they will comprise 20 percent.

  • It is a busy time of year for Kentucky families as students get back into the routine of school with many after-school activities, like football and soccer, getting into full gear. I want to wish all the students, teachers and school staff a great year. With each new school year comes great opportunities and chances to achieve new levels of learning and great experience.

  • You never forget the name of the person who almost killed your wife.
    I must first tell you, my need to fight injustice can sometimes come back to haunt me. In my last column, I told you the story about how some kid stole my bike and my wife’s bike when we were living in South Korea. Well, the truth is, I should have let them be. As it turned out, getting those bikes back would spell trouble for us. More so for my wife, Emily.

  • When it comes to being home to icons known around the world, few states can compete with Kentucky.
    We have a derby that owns the first Saturday in May; a chicken restaurant chain that has grown from a single location in Corbin to more than 15,000 in 125 nations; and a cave so mammoth that it is longer than the combined lengths of the second- and third-longest on the record books. The six million-plus barrels of bourbon now resting in our warehouses, meanwhile, represent more than 90 percent of the world’s production.

  • Although summer break is coming to an end, summer weather—and hazards—will continue. However, there are a few things you can do to help keep your family safe, happy and healthy for the rest of the season, especially while enjoying the great outdoors.

  • By Tommy Wheatley

    At the start of the summer of 1980, I was a college student looking forward to a seasonal job near Hardinsburg, Kentucky, my hometown. I was charged with overseeing a summer youth employment program, matching 16- to 21-year-old workers with non-profit employers.
    That summer, I first realized the impact the workforce development system has on individuals and our entire communities. But little did I know, the job was the start of my own lifelong career and passion.

  • By Dr. Evelyn Ellis

    It’s been said that mentoring is a brain to pick, an ear to listen and a push in the right direction.
    In this column, I want to talk about the value of professional mentorship.  In my role with WKU Elizabethtown-Fort Knox and as a member of the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board, I’m charged with helping people succeed in their chosen career fields, from pursuing their education to connecting them with employers.

  • Some of Kentucky’s most successful academic programs take place, oddly enough, when the school year is over.
    Several of these got their start in the 1980s, and they have since given thousands of our brightest middle and high school students a chance to come together in a college setting and learn in ways that often extend beyond the traditional classroom.
    The Governor’s Scholars Program (GSP) is perhaps the most well-known of these. It began in 1983 and now serves more than 1,100 students each summer over several campuses across the commonwealth.