.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • We know that seconds matter especially in an emergency, and for that reason, it’s good that Marion County and Lebanon city officials appear to be on the same page with regard to implementing enhanced 911.
    It’s also unfortunate that it’s taken decades to get to this point.
    Last week, the Enhanced 911 Advisory Committee held a public meeting, which also included city and county officials and emergency personnel.

  • After a pause in legislative work Monday, Jan. 20, to honor the life and legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the Senate reconvened Tuesday, Jan. 21, in a joint session with the House to hear the Governor’s budget proposal.

  • In spite of cold weather and less-than-ideal road conditions, hundreds of people made it to this year's Kentucky Bluegrass Music Kickoff.
    When the festival started, it was held at the Centre Square Convention Center, but it didn't take long for the event to need more space. Since then, it's been held at Marion County High School.

  • By Ken Begley
    Guest columnist

    If you don’t know the answer to that question then you need to attend the Central Kentucky Community Theatre’s presentation of the Frank Wildhorn musical, “Jekyll & Hyde.”

  • Sunday night I was watching television when I saw a commercial promoting the natural gas industry. The spokeswoman referred to hydraulic fracturing as proven safe and reliable.
    The intent was clear: hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, is nothing to worry about.
    It seems a little optimistic to make that claim. The EPA is in the process of conducting its own study (see here: http://www2.epa.gov/hfstudy).

  • Shortly after Governor Beshear first took office in late 2007, he remarked that not only did he find the cupboard bare, it was actually gone.
    It hasn’t gotten any easier since then. Cumulative budget cuts over the last six years have reached $1.6 billion, the state government workforce has shrunk to its smallest size in 40 years and the list of needs continues to grow faster than the revenue coming in.

  • The second week of the 2014 Regular Session brought schedules packed with meetings, rallies, press conferences and hearings on bills. We met with constituents, citizen groups and fellow lawmakers as we began vetting proposed legislation.

  • Last week, the House of Representatives turned its attention to two issues that may not seem to have much in common but are linked nonetheless because of the positive impact both could have on a significant number of Kentuckians.
    The first vote came early in the week, when the chamber put its support behind the creation of public benefit corporations. As its name implies, this legal designation would give private businesses a chance to better verify their commitment to serving not just their customers but their community as well.

  • Demi Moore.
    Sigourney Weaver.
    Charlize Theron.
    Natalie Portman.
    What do the women above have in common? They have all shaved their heads for money.
    On March 15, we’ll be able to add another name to that list — Enterprise Publisher Stevie Lowery. That day, the 2014 St. Baldrick’s event will be held from 1-3 p.m. at St. Augustine School in Lebanon.

  • “Is your hair naturally curly?”
    I have been asked that question hundreds of times.
    “You’re so lucky,” is the response I often receive after confirming that, yes, my hair is indeed naturally curly.
    Apparently, from what I’ve been told, many women would pay good money to have curls like mine.
    And, I will admit, it’s been a blessing because it’s so low-maintenance. I only get a haircut maybe once every two or three months. And, I don’t have to buy expensive hair products.

  • As temperatures plummeted to near record lows across the Commonwealth on Jan. 2, state’s lawmakers convened the 2014 Regular Session.
    Our biggest task this year – as with every 60-day “long session” – will be writing the state government’s biennial budget. It’s a job that’s even more complex as we continue the hard uphill climb out of the worst recession in recent history.

  • The first week or two of a legislative session may seem slow at first glance, but that doesn’t diminish the importance of these opening days. That’s because this is the time when legislators and the governor alike lay out their priorities, setting the stage for what we hope can be accomplished by the time we finish our work, which this year will be on April 15.

  • Karen Spalding dedicated her career to serving the public.
    During her senior year  at Marion County High School, Spalding went to work in the Marion County Clerk’s Office more than 39 years ago. In 2006, she was elected to lead that office. Her co-workers and later her employees praised her abilities and her willingness to do whatever she could to assist the public.

  • Central Kentucky Community Action Council, Inc. is a private non-profit 501c3 organization that provides services to families of low income in our eight county service area – which includes Breckinridge, Grayson, Hardin, LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington counties. Our central office is located at 332 Hood Avenue in Lebanon. The agency employees 207 dedicated persons and operates with a $10 million annual budget.  

  • NGL pipelines. We’ve all heard about them. By now, we all have our opinions about them. But no one really thinks a private company should be allowed to seize land via eminent domain for its own profit making plans. Now is the time to act!
    Neighbors? These companies are not, nor will they be our neighbors! Neighbors live on the land, not merely speculate with it.

  • I could barely see his eyes when he showed up on my doorstep.
    His long, stringy hair covered most of his face. His coat was wet and covered in mud. Parts of his body were covered with huge mounds of matted hair.
    He was very quiet, and seemed frightened. He wouldn’t let me get too close.
    I assumed he was hungry so I brought him some dog food, which he spilled all over the ground. Desperate to feed this poor animal, I found some country ham leftover from Christmas in my refrigerator, which he wolfed down as fast as I could give it to him.

  • I send my best regards to you and your family for the New Year. The holidays are behind us now, and we strive to get back into our routine with school and work. For me, Jan. 7 convened the 2014 General Assembly, a 60-day legislative session creating the next two-year budget for Kentucky. This year is loaded with issues that require legislative action as the Senate Majority strives to make pathways for economic growth and fight for fiscal responsibility.

  • The General Assembly returned to the Capitol on Tuesday this week, and it is worth taking one last look back at 2013, to review some of the issues my legislative colleagues and I have been studying in recent months.

  • While there are dozens of issues considered during a legislative session, the General Assembly’s top priority in even-numbered years is always the same: Adopt a budget to run state government.