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Opinion

  • Consider the quotes and the statements below:

  • By Ryan Craig

    Editor, The Todd County Standard

    Despite the hubbub concerning the Affordable Care Act or Obama Care or (depending on your political leaning) the end of civilization or the beginning of a beautiful tomorrow, I look forward to trying to get different, cheaper insurance.

    Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m kind of like Switzerland when it comes to the idea of a marketplace to shop for insurance.

  • From a historical perspective, it is not much of a stretch to say that some of the Western Hemisphere’s first farmers were Kentuckians.

    That’s because the Red River Gorge in Eastern Kentucky is just one of a few hotspots in North and South America where archeologists say modern agriculture took its first steps. Early bands of pre-historic settlers found its soil and climate ideal to domesticate such wild plants as the sunflower, whose seeds added both flavor and nutrition to their food.

  • The government shutdown is underway. 

    Well, the partial government shutdown is underway.

    The House and the Senate have not yet reached an agreement on a funding bill, and as a result “non-essential” government services have ended and employees have been furloughed. (Members of Congress are still being paid, however.)

    Locally, the Farm Service Agency and Natural Resources and Soil Conservation offices are closed.

  • By Delena Trent

    Executive Director, The Caring Place

    For almost 13 years, you’ve listened to me talk to your organizations and churches. You’ve read my articles published in the newspaper and you’ve donated from your hearts. For that, I am so thankful.

    Here are two letters from former clients that tell you the true stories of what they went through before escaping a life of domestic violence and emotional abuse from their partners.

  • I thoroughly enjoyed the 100th anniversary of the post office building in Lebanon and wish everyone could have been there. The pictures showing the progress of the building and its growth from 1911 to 1913 were fascinating! I hope that all builders took pictures back then and still do this today!

    Geri Rucker

    Lebanon

  • We are writing this letter in regard to the Ham Days celebration as we have attended for several years and enjoy it so much. But, this year we were surprised that the shuttle buses had been done away with. They are a great asset to helping the elderly in getting to the celebration without having to contend with the traffic.

    It is wonderful that the idea of Ham Days started in 1969.

    Keep up the good work.

    Rev. and Mrs. Ron Moroni

  • No matter the subject, it seems we always want to know how we compare with others. 

    It happens on the playing field, in the boardroom and in the classroom. It also takes place among the states as they try to gain any kind of competitive edge.

  • By Kaelin G. Reed

  • As we move into fall and our schedules become full with our kids’ homework and after-school activities, it’s always a good time to focus on their safety, too.  Much like the calls and e-mails I receive from constituents in need of the Veteran’s Crisis Hotline, I also receive a number of calls and e-mails from constituents looking for information on the Amber Alert program, as well as the best way to get information on sexual predators in the community.

  • Senator Higdon is wrong

  • The last group of inmates have left Marion Adjustment Center.
    The Kentucky Department of Corrections data shows that on Sept. 16, 14 inmates were being housed at the private prison in St. Mary.
    As of Sept. 17, MAC was no longer listed in the state’s daily count reports (available here: http://goo.gl/gHhMz).
    I apologize for not reporting this sooner. I had the information for last week’s paper, but among the various stories we juggle, I forgot to actually type it.

  • We're all guilty of it.
    We ignore warning labels.
    We drive short distances without our seatbelts.
    We take the batteries out of our smoke alarms because it just won't stop beeping in the middle of the night.
    We shake our heads at a car full of teenagers driving too fast and say, "They think they're invincible."
    But don't we all? Until tragedy strikes us, we all walk around feeling a little bit invincible.
    I did, too. Until Aug. 9 when flames engulfed my home.

  • Two students were not included in A.C. Glasscock Elementary School’s Students of the Month for August. They were Madison Knopp and Brandon Hill.
     

  • From the Lexington Herald Leader

    House Republicans are right to be outraged that 14 percent of American households are on food stamps, but they're outraged for the wrong reason.
    The plight of so many Americans — including the 1 in 5 Kentuckians who depend on food stamps — stems from the worst economic inequality on record.

  • From the Lexington Herald Leader

    Gov. Steve Beshear and many lawmakers have consoled themselves with the soothing fiction that, despite deep cuts in everything from child care to State Police, Kentucky weathered the Great Recession without cutting basic state support for public schools.
    While that might be technically true, the real-life effect of years of flat appropriations, while costs grew, is a decline of almost 10 percent in per-student funding from fiscal 2008 until this year.

  • I received an e-mail last month from one of my constituents expressing her frustration about abuses of government low-income assistance programs. She said she was fed up, and I can sympathize.
    She detailed misuses she had witnessed of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) funds. I am sure many of you reading this have witnessed or heard of people who wrongly use or take advantage of such programs.

  • The dream act opens a door

    I join social service workers, people of all faith traditions, and concerned citizens in urging real comprehensive and fair immigration reform. Members of all political parties agree that our immigration system is broken. Now is the time to fix it.

  • In the late 1990s, when the General Assembly overhauled Kentucky’s public colleges and universities, one of the reform’s central planks was to improve the level of research.
    To spur that along, the state created “Bucks for Brains” and called on the schools to match that money with private donations, an initiative that has since raised more than $800 million.