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Opinion

  • At 11:37 a.m. on Friday, Aug. 9, my house was filled with smoke. More than likely, a melted gas line was already causing a blow-torch effect that burned through our basement floor, charred our first floor hallway and caused our cat, Moe, to perish from smoke inhalation.
    At 11:37 a.m., my friend, the newspaper publisher, called me to ask my house number.
    "475."
    "Your house is on fire."

    ***

  • We may be a little more than halfway through 2013, but in Washington and state governments across the country, the focus is increasingly on federal actions taken in 2011.
    The issue can be summed up in one word: sequestration.

  • Say no to Bluegrass Pipeline
    We wish to commend all members of Marion County Fiscal Court for passage of the resolution to protect the health, safety, and property rights of citizens in this county against those private out-of-state interests involved with the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline.
    In this, our day of often lagging and unresponsive governmental leadership, our faith in fundamentals of the American way has been restored.

  • I was in the middle of writing this column when an email arrived in my inbox from BluegrassPipeline@Wiliams.com.
    “Recent news stories have given many Kentuckians an incorrect view of this project and what it means for the Commonwealth,” the email read.

  • For generations now, students have been taught that Abraham Lincoln was the first native Kentuckian to be U.S. President.
    Technically speaking, however, that’s not true.

  • By Hillary C. Wright
    Guest columnist

  • As we look for ways to increase Kentucky’s competitiveness, we are also looking for ways to reduce excessive spending and keep taxpayers from being unduly burdened. 

  • By Lynne B. Robey

    Executive Director, Central Kentucky Community Action Council

    Central Kentucky Community Action Council, Inc. is a 501(c)3 private nonprofit organization, established in 1966, that provides services to approximately 9,000 families, including 20,000 persons of low income in our eight county service area that includes Breckinridge, Grayson, Hardin, LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington Counties. Our central office is located in Lebanon.

  • By Joe Stevens

    Guest Columnist

    The IRS treats everyone the same, appointed government officials do not have leanings towards the party that appointed them, the Benghazi attack on Sept. 11, 2012 was not a terrorist attack, the shooting at the U.S. Air Force Base in Texas was “workplace violence,” and there were no private deals made by the Marion County School Board when considering the next superintendent.

  • As we look for ways to increase Kentucky’s competitiveness, we are also looking for ways to reduce excessive spending and keep taxpayers from being unduly burdened.

  • By Lynne B. Robey
    Executive Director
    Central Kentucky Community Action Council, Inc.

    Central Kentucky Community Action Council, Inc. is a 501c3 private nonprofit organization, established in 1966, that provides services to approximately 9,000 families, including 20,000 persons of low income in our eight county service area that includes Breckinridge, Grayson, Hardin, LaRue, Marion, Meade, Nelson and Washington Counties. Our central office is located in Lebanon.

  • By Joe Stevens, guest columnist

    The IRS treats everyone the same, appointed government officials do not have leanings towards the party that appointed them, the Benghazi attack on Sept. 11, 2012 was not a terrorist attack, the shooting at the U.S. Air Force Base in Texas was “workplace violence,” and there were no private deals made by the Marion County School Board when considering the next superintendent.

  • Of all the challenges Kentucky can expect to face in the years ahead, few if any are bigger than improving our collective health.
    In some key areas, we already have a good head start. Kentucky is among the top 20 states in fighting infectious diseases, for example, with the use of vaccines high and the percentage of older citizens getting a flu shot above the national average.

  • It’s been a busy few months for the Marion County Board of Education. Many things have happened in a very short amount of time. So, let’s review…
    Superintendent Chuck Hamilton unexpectedly announced his retirement on May 2, and the search for a new superintendent began immediately.
    On June 25, the board hired Steve Burkich as the acting superintendent of Marion County Public Schools.

  • There were several Interim Joint Committee meetings this past week, including a Special Subcommittee on Energy that focused on Kentucky’s struggling coal industry and the adverse impact of impending federal regulations. The decline in coal production that could result from these regulations is not just an Eastern Kentucky issue, but a serious statewide issue, as well.

  • Say no to pipeline
    I have followed, with interest, the developments surrounding the so-called 
    Bluegrass pipeline and still, for the life of me cannot figure out where the long term benefit is for the residents along the proposed route of Kentucky (Marion, LaRue, Nelson, Hardin, Anderson, Woodford, Scott, Franklin, etc). I ask you, is it really worth the offered price to have your land disturbed for construction and to be at the mercy of the pipeline for any projects where ground is broken?

  • By Melissa Lee Knight
     
    My brother, Larry Lee, suffered a brain injury at the age of 12 from a farm accident and though it seemed he healed physically in a relatively short time, by the time he reached high school we realized his injury would have repercussions that affected his whole life. We knew Larry’s symptoms were a direct result of a very traumatic brain injury, but not all head injuries are that easy to spot. 

  • They may be relatively unknown, and their subject matter may be a little dry, but the eight economists who comprise the Consensus Forecasting Group have a powerful role to play: They determine just how much money state government can expect.
    As anyone who has ever put a budget together knows, it can be tough to predict what a year will bring. Their job, however, is even more difficult: They have to look more than 30 months ahead, to cover not just the two-year span for the budget but also the six additional months needed to prepare, pass and implement it.

  • FRANKFORT – The past couple of weeks have been busy in and around Frankfort with joint committee meetings on a wide range of issues including the DOD’s planned forced brigade reduction at Ft. Knox, the possible ways to help SNAP recipients better balance their food budgets, and the impact of impending federal regulations on coal.