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Opinion

  • They may be relatively unknown, and their subject matter may be a little dry, but the eight economists who comprise the Consensus Forecasting Group have a powerful role to play: They determine just how much money state government can expect.
    As anyone who has ever put a budget together knows, it can be tough to predict what a year will bring. Their job, however, is even more difficult: They have to look more than 30 months ahead, to cover not just the two-year span for the budget but also the six additional months needed to prepare, pass and implement it.

  • FRANKFORT – The past couple of weeks have been busy in and around Frankfort with joint committee meetings on a wide range of issues including the DOD’s planned forced brigade reduction at Ft. Knox, the possible ways to help SNAP recipients better balance their food budgets, and the impact of impending federal regulations on coal.

  • I received a phone call Friday from a citizen concerned about the Bluegrass Pipeline. He’d heard it could be coming through the northwestern part of Marion County.
    If you haven’t heard about the pipeline, here’s what I’ve been able to learn so far.  According to the official website for the project (bluegrasspipeline.com), The Williams and Boardwalk Pipeline Partners, LP, are working on the project, which would transport natural gas liquids from Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Ohio to the northeastern United States and the Gulf Coast.

  • For those of us who recall what it was like to have dinner regularly interrupted by unwanted telemarketers, late last month was a special time, because it marked the 10th anniversary of the National Do Not Call Registry.

  • I celebrated my birthday last week, and while I’m a year older, I’m still too young to have experienced the Elvis Presley era.
    Well, I got a glimpse of it Friday night right here in Lebanon.
    And, let me tell you, it was an experience.
    As I stood in line waiting to enter Angelic Hall for Eddie Miles’ concert - “A Salute to Elvis and Country Legends” - I felt a little out of place because, well, almost everyone else was a tad bit older than me.

  • My name is Tyler Gribbins and I would like to tell you about one thing that matters most to me, and that is about having two moms. For 11 years now I have grown up with two mom, Leigh Ann Fogle and Debbie Gribbins. Most people are against gay women or gay men, but I am 100 percent for being yourself. When people put mean things in the newspaper about gay is a horrible thing. It really upsets me and my two moms. Now I will give you examples.

  • As we mark the reopening of Highway 247, I would like to express my appreciation to Governor Steve Beshear and the Transportation Cabinet officials in Elizabethtown for making the repair of the highway, as well as the Bull Run Creek safety project, high priorities for emergency funding.

  • At the end of each legislative session, there is understandably a lot of discussion about what the General Assembly has passed.
    Although not given as much fanfare, the early to middle part of summer is an important period as well, because – other than those relatively rare cases when there is a specific enactment date or an emergency clause – that is when all legislation actually takes effect.  This year, that date fell on June 25.

  • In last week’s story “Fighting to Survive” about Marion Adjustment Center, Warden Daniel Akers was incorrectly identified as David Akers.
    In last week’s sports section, a cutline from the recent Dirt Bowl incorrectly identified a player as Spencer Riggs. The player should have been identified as Antonio Douglas.
     

  • A newspaper, like many work places, can make your co-workers feel like family. You spend a lot of time together, often more than you spend at home with your real family.

  • Impressed with honor guard
    On June 28, 2013, my wife and I were at Lee’s Chicken in Lebanon sitting in the corner booth looking out the window when these gentlemen walked to the corner and were just standing there. They wore uniforms that appeared to be Navy uniforms. Then two other men walked up, and they were also wearing a uniform. Then suddenly, more and more kept walking up, each wearing a different uniform.

  • Last week, I announced that the Kentucky Department of Corrections would not enter into a new contract with Marion Adjustment Center once the current contract expires on June 30.
    It was a difficult decision, and brought an end to a successful partnership between the Commonwealth and MAC. This success is a direct result of MAC's effective programming and dedicated staff, and is in no way a reflection on the well-trained workforce and efficient operation in Marion County.
    The decision was strictly a function of inmate population and institutional capacity.

  • Don't poke Turtleman fans. They might bite.

  • Last week was just one of “those weeks.”
    You know… one of those weeks where it seems everything goes wrong.
    Monday -  deadline day for us folks here at the newspaper - there was a flash flood in downtown Lebanon and several businesses, including the Enterprise, were flooded. At 5 p.m. Monday, we were frantically using stacks of old newspapers as if they were sand bags and moving computers away from incoming water. We managed to finish the paper before deadline, but we were frazzled, to say the least.

  • HB 463 has been criticized by many people in the corrections industry and in the law enforcement field because of certain provisions in that law. Thousands of prisoners have been released early from jails and prisons statewide, not because they had earned the time off, but because it would save the state money.

  • To better understand just how involved Kentucky is in transporting and exporting products across the country and around the world, consider the lobster.
    Most people normally wouldn’t associate the commonwealth with the crustacean, but they should, because for more than a decade now, we have been home to the world’s largest inland lobster tank. It’s a key stopping point between Nova Scotia and some of the United States’ finest restaurants.

  • An article in the June 12 edition incorrectly identified Patricia Pulliam as a physician’s assistant. She is a nurse practitioner.
     

  • Does anyone have a great grandmother or great aunt by the name of Gertrude who married Thedis Coppage Brown from Bradfordsville in the early 1900s? She and Brown had two children. They were living in Marion County in 1910.

  • I often read my hometown newspaper, The Moultrie (Ga.) Observer online and keep up with folks I've known for years. I'm also interested in what actions governmental bodies act upon.
    Recently, the council held second reading on a measure updating an ordinance aimed at public indecency, most notably, at people who wear sagging pants, exposing their underwear, and backsides, to the world.
    The old ordinance states in its entirety: “It shall be unlawful for any person within this city to commit any act of public indecency.”

  • As you may know, the interim is in full swing with committees continuing to meet to study new issues and to review the progress of newly enacted laws. These committees are made up of both Senate and House members and are known as Interim Joint Committees. I chair the Veterans, Military Affairs, and Public Protection Committee and the Budget Review Subcommittee on Transportation. I serve on nine other committees and task forces that tackle issues ranging from to energy to education to health and welfare to economic development and tourism, among others.