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Opinion

  • By Connie Goff

    Adult education centers offer a lifeline to adults who want to expand opportunities available to them. In every county across Kentucky, adult education centers offer a number of free services such as academic instruction, GED preparation, skills training and more. By reaching adults who are underemployed, unemployed or not currently in the labor market, the centers also are key partners in developing a strong workforce.

  • By Rev. Carrie Mook Bridgman

    I spent last week at Logan Martin Lake in Alabama, with an unusually large collection of family and friends: my husband and son, my father-in-law, my dad and his wife, a friend of my husband’s whom we rarely see, and three (count them, three) friends of my son’s, who is about to start his senior year in high school. Not everyone was there the whole week, but the cabin was a bit full. Luckily, the weather was good, and we spent most of our time outside when not sleeping or reading on the porch.

  • By G.B. Dixon

  • By Jerry Evans
    Guest columnist

  • By Joshua C. Hicks

  • This week, Pastor Joshua Hicks has written a response to a column I wrote July 15. I would urge you to read that before reading this.
    Pastor Hicks and I would agree about many things, such as murdering people is wrong, people should not steal, and, we should try to help others.
    On homosexuality, we are not going to agree.

  • Tyler Hamilton, 24, fought demons during his short life.
    He suffered from bi-polar disorder and drug addiction, but he had a good heart, according to his parents.
    In fact, it was his actual heart that saved the life of a teenage girl at Kosair Children’s Hospital last week.
    Tyler was an organ donor, and after his sudden and tragic death Wednesday, July 29, his heart and both of his kidneys were donated to three Kentuckians who desperately needed the organs to survive.

  • For decades now, Kentucky State Police has annually compiled a comprehensive look at crime across the commonwealth, giving the public and law enforcement alike a much clearer picture of the challenges we face.
    The reports come out each summer and pull together data from local and state agencies, highlighting both short- and long-term trends. A comparison of 2014 with 1995, for example, shows that DUIs have dropped significantly – from 33,000 then to 22,500 last year – but that drug offenses have sky-rocketed, growing from less than 18,000 to more than 58,000.

  • Marion County Distinguished Young Women participant No. 11 Kelsie Edelen is the daughter of Gigi and Russ Edelen. Her father’s name was not provided to the Enterprise in the information the Distinguished Young Women Committee submitted to the newspaper. Kelly Lynn Peterson’s parents should have been listed as Thad and Kim Peterson. That mistake was also due to incorrect information provided to the Enterprise by the Distinguished Young Women Committee.

  • By Jama Watts

    Guest columnist

     

    If you’ve been in the Marion County Public Library recently, then you’re well aware of how busy we can be.  (And if you haven’t been in, why not? We’re the place to be!) Not only does MCPL serve our county’s population of 20,000, but MCPL also has patrons from the seven counties on our borders.

  • By Mary Taylor

    Guest columnist

     

    It’s no secret that many businesses in Kentucky and across the country face challenges in finding the skilled employees they need, and employers, educators and others agree that part of the solution is the development of career pathways for secondary students.
    Tech Ready Apprentices for Careers in Kentucky, or TRACK, is a statewide program helping local industries and school districts in the Lincoln Trail region do just that.

  • By Jonathan Bennett
    Guest columnist

  • At the corner of Lincoln and Edmonds Avenues, a home is under construction. Structurally, it’s going to be a house. But when it’s complete, Daphne Staples and her two children will be moving into their new home.
    Staples is this year’s partner with the My New Kentucky Home chapter of Habitat for Humanity. The Build Blitz held July 18-19 ended with the interior wall frames and the exterior walls being raised and the roof being affixed to the structure.

  • By Carrie Bridgman

    I'm glad to have started a conversation with my column on marriage equality, as it is a conversation that needs to happen. Given the number of recent editorials discussing my column, I want to clarify several points. Anyone who would like to speak with me further about this issue is welcome to contact me privately.

  • By G.B. Dixon

    The lights are dark once more on the stage of Angelic Hall in Centre Square. "The Sound of Music" has concluded. Gone altogether are the crowds which lent personality to each chair for two weekends. Home are the stagehands, the technicians, costumers, ushers, musicians, and actors that dedicated themselves to summoning the excellence of Broadway to the Bluegrass. Weary are the producer and director.

  • The recent United States Supreme Court ruling on Obergefell vs. Hodges has overturned bans against same-sex marriage for all states in the U.S. This, of course, includes Kentucky, and there have been questions raised by county clerks, religious leaders, legislators, and citizens. An issue such as this is personal for many, and it is not a surprise that the transition has been complicated. As your senator, it is my job to look at how the ruling affects Kentucky statutes and our constitution. We will have work to do on this issue in the next general assembly.

  • Earlier this year, when the General Assembly approved legislation designed to curb the state’s heroin epidemic, many called the law a national model because of the way it blended additional treatment, smart-on-crime measures and tougher penalties for traffickers.
    On Monday, July 20, we learned that another comprehensive law in this field, this one targeting prescription drug abuse, is making the significant difference that other legislators and I had hoped when we passed it in 2012.

  • Keep art and art teacher at SCMS
    I read with dismay that St. Charles Middle School had eliminated art classes. It might have been nice to give the public a little notice that this decision was pending, so that input from parents and grandparents would have been possible.

  • By Jennifer Brockman

    I am writing in response to Rev. Bridgman’s article “Respect for One Another.”

  • By George L. Faull

    I saw a letter by Carrie Bridgman on “Respect One Another” concerning gay marriage. Her letter is dripping with niceness “no name calling” and encouraging tolerance.
    She says that she is not going to call those who disagree with her “bigots.” She says those of us who disagree with her is because we read the scriptures literally.