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Opinion

  • They may wear a variety of uniforms and have different areas of expertise, but one quality binds all first responders: They’re the ones who immediately run toward an emergency when the first impulse is to run away.
    Their invaluable contributions have been highlighted in recent weeks in the aftermath of the Boston bombings, the ricin-poisoned letters in Washington, D.C., and Mississippi and the explosion at a Texas fertilizer plant.

  • From The State Journal (Frankfort)

    The leading causes of death in the United States are heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases and stroke. Accidents rank fifth on the list.
    Those accidents, however, are deaths caused by unintentional injuries, not by a terrorist incident such as the one that happened Monday, April 15, in Boston.
    The three most common types of accidents that result in death are car wrecks, falls and unintentional poisonings.

  • When it comes to energy, less really is more if it gets the same job done. As our country works to maximize every watt, amp and BTU, it’s worth noting that Kentucky is playing a major role in leading the way.

  • Editor’s note: This is the fifth story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer look at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

  • If you have a cellular phone, you are probably aware that 3G service is available in Marion County, regardless of who your provider is.
    Recently, I received an email asking when 4G is coming.
    I guess that’s an inevitable question since wireless service advertisements are touting 4G devices and networks. As we all know, that doesn’t mean that service is available everywhere.
    I sent emails to both AT&T and Bluegrass Cellular last week to try to find out more about 4G. Here’s what I’ve heard so far.

  • Over the last generation, Kentucky has seen a lot of success when it comes to boosting the education level of our workforce.
    Since 1994, according to the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE), the number of those employed who have a bachelor’s degree has jumped 80 percent, while those with a high school diploma or less has dropped by more than a tenth.
    That’s a trend that needs to continue, because CPE estimates that, by the year 2020, more than half of Kentucky’s jobs will require at least some college experience.

  • In the April 3, 2013 edition, a wedding announcement for Justin and Brittney Clark should have listed his parents’ address as Bowling Green. Also, Daniel Gordon was identified incorrectly as Daniel Rakes.

    A news story in the April 3 edition should have read that Adrienne and Candace Tucker, both 19, of Campbellsville were cited for violations of the social host ordinance. They were not arrested.
     

  • Before I wrote this column Monday evening, I had to go for a run.
    I had been sitting at my desk all afternoon and evening reading reports about the explosions that killed at least two people and injured hundreds of others near the finish line at the Boston Marathon. I held back tears as I viewed images taken by photographers of the gruesome scene, the sidewalks covered in blood.
    Initially, I thought it had to be a hoax.
    Why would anyone do something like this at one of our oldest, most prestigious running events?
    It was unthinkable.

  • Imagine getting up earlier on a beautiful day and going somewhere where everyone is excited and in a great mood. The atmosphere is uplifting, knowing you are about to do something fun that is also wonderful for your health. The sense of accomplishment that you will feel at the end is amazing! And anyone can do it!

  • Every legislative session, the General Assembly looks for ways it can improve the lives of our children, both in the classroom and when it comes to their safety.
    This year, the House and Senate passed several new laws that further both of these goals.
    One of the more widely publicized will establish a permanent, independent panel to review those cases in which a child either died or was severely injured as a result of abuse or neglect.

  • Kids like lettuce, too!

    Dear McDonalds,
    Hey, listen up!
    Why don’t you put lettuce on kids meals?
    It would go good with the cheeseburgers.
    You people have no respect for our health. Lettuce is VERY healthy.
    Put lettuce on them. You would probably get more money.
    PLEASE put lettuce on them.
    Write back! And I mean it.
    Your customer,
    Charlee Lawson
    Age 8
    Loretto

     

    Defend your rights

  • By Rand Paul

    U.S. Senator

    If I had planned to speak for 13 hours when I took the Senate floor to start my filibuster, I would’ve worn more comfortable shoes. I started the filibuster with the words, “I rise today to begin to filibuster John Brennan’s nomination for the CIA. I will speak until I can no longer speak” — and I meant it.

  • You should watch the movie “V for Vendetta” and consider the content.

    You should watch the dud, “The Next Three Days,” and memorize the important parts.

    Remember that surrender of your freedom and rights invites brutality or death.

    “The Islamic Al-Jazeera has Al Gore’s cable channel, Current TV, to have access to the U.S. media market. Gore has reportedly made $100 million from the $500 million deal.” – Accuracy in Media

  •  The Community Service Center, Inc. was created by local churches to minister to the needy of Marion County. The First Christian Church in Lebanon is generous enough to allow us to work out of their building.  We provide emergency help with food, clothing, rent, utilities and prescriptions. We are a strictly a volunteer group using funds and supplies donated by some of the area churches, civic organizations and other generous benefactors. 

  • The 30-day session of the General Assembly concluded at midnight March 26, after two long days of hard work and bipartisan collaboration to ensure the state’s most pressing issues were addressed. 

  • It took nearly a year of study, months of debate and several long nights to finalize, but the General Assembly achieved its biggest goal this legislative session when it enacted far-reaching reforms of Kentucky’s public retirement systems early last week.

  • Comments from the “military press”:
    1. Dangerous government – “The power of government is great and, therefore, exceptionally dangerous.”
    2. Priceless – “Any man who thinks he can be happy and prosperous by letting the government take care of him better take a closer look at the American Indian.” – Henry Ford
    3. The Second Amendment – “The beauty of the second amendment is that it will not be needed until they try and take it.” – Thomas Jefferson

  • On March 13, on opinion page A6, an article entitled “Marketing Changes to Lebanon” it was stated rather than to promote Lebanon by name, the community was promoted with the phrase, “Bourbon, Coopers, and Moonshine Still.”
    I am one of eight sons born to Edna and Spencer Clark Sr..  I graduated from the former Lebanon High School with many fond memories of my school, church, and community.  However, I was completely astonished and disgusted by the article about my hometown.

  • On March 11, Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw issued a memo stating that city employees should no longer do any work on private property, acknowledging that city employees have assisted homeowners and business owners with minor matters in the past.
    “While these acts may have been performed with good intentions, they must not continue,” Crenshaw wrote.
    He added that going forward, the city would follow the letter of the law.

  • Each legislative session is invariably remembered for one or two high-profile laws, but there are always many others that, while not getting as much attention, are important as well.