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Opinion

  • With the expanded preschool program offered by MCPS for the 2015-2016 school year there are more options than ever before to build strong foundations for our children’s education in Marion County. With public school, parochial school and day care options for early childhood education there is an option to meet every family’s financial and scheduling needs.

  • In 1913, when the automotive industry first set up shop in Kentucky, few then could have imagined just how much of an impact it would have on the commonwealth in the decades ahead.
    It all began on South Third Street in Louisville, where 17 employees could assemble up to 12 of Ford’s Model T vehicles on a good day.
    Now, we churn out more than 3,500 a day on average at our four assembly plants, or about 1.3 million a year. That’s a traffic jam stretching from Seattle to Miami.

  • By Dawn Przystal

    Throughout Kentucky, tourism is playing a greater role in local economies and the Lincoln Trail region is no exception. Our region’s rich history, beautiful natural landscapes, ability to quench the world’s thirst for bourbon and much more not only make our region a great place to live and work, but also a great place to visit.

  • The following is a column my father, Steve Lowery, published in the July 19, 1979 edition of The Lebanon Enterprise. Maybe his words will make you think twice before ignoring or passing by that local firefighter collecting money for the Crusade for Children this weekend.

    For the past few years I've bitched every time the WHAS Crusade for Children drive was in progress. The Crusade meant that people would be looking for financial handouts to give to Norton Children's Hospital in Louisville, an institution far removed from my everyday thoughts.

  • By Jama Watts
    Guest columnist

    School is out, which means your local library has been taken over by children and crazy librarians embracing the summer reading theme, “Every Hero Has a Story.” (You may have even seen some of us running around the library and schools in capes and masks.) 

  • As we transition from spring to summer, so many milestone events are taking place in the lives of our young people across Kentucky. I want to send out congratulations and best wishes to all our high school and higher education graduates. Kentucky has a bright future and it is in the hands of these capable young men and women, who are each beginning a new and important chapter in life.

  • Eighty years ago, historical preservation took a major step forward when the federal government began compiling a list of those irreplaceable landmarks that help define our country’s heritage.

  • Work on the Bluegrass Pipeline may have been suspended, but a court battle that started because of that project was updated last week.
    The Kentucky Court of Appeals upheld a Franklin Circuit Court ruling that eminent domain cannot be used to complete natural gas liquids pipelines under state law.

  • After weathering several tough budget cycles, the state is on track to end the current fiscal year next month with much better news to report.
    Two weeks ago, the Office of State Budget Director said that April’s general fund receipts – which drive the budget – brought in a little more than $1 billion, a high-water mark that had never happened in a single month before.

  • By Amber Mudd

    With graduation season upon us, many high school graduates are embarking on new territory – joining the workforce.
    The Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail has many no-cost services for those just starting out, but recent graduates also will look for guidance at home.

  • Last week I started doing something I should have done a long time ago.
    I finally started going through the archives of The Lebanon Enterprise, specifically the eight years my dad was editor/general manager here.
    Why in the world has it taken me so long to do this?

  • By Kentucky New Era

    In the next few days the National Weather Service predicts temperatures will climb to at least 80 degrees. Western Kentuckians who are accustomed to brutal humidity and scorching hot days in the summer will enjoy an 80-degree day as a relatively mild and pleasant day.

  • Memorial Day is significant in Kentucky in a variety of ways, such as marking the unofficial beginning of summer with schools nearing the end of the semester, vacationers descending in droves to our lakes and rivers, and warm weather and sunshine becoming the norm.
    Memorial Day is also a time that many use as a day to remember their loved ones who have died; taking flowers to graves of relatives, and maybe even traveling back to their hometown for reunions and visits.

  • It may not be the official start of the season, but for most of us, the upcoming three-day weekend is when summer arrives.
    This time is about much more than that, of course. More importantly, it’s when our nation pays tribute to those who died defending our country.
    That list now has more than 1.2 million names, about half of which were added during the four years of the Civil War.

  • The deadline to submit comments to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission regarding the Tennessee Gas Pipeline is approaching quickly.
    May 18 is the last day FERC will be accepting comments related to a possible environmental assessment related to Tennessee Gas Pipeline’s plans to repurpose a portion of that natural gas line to carry natural gas liquids. The plan includes selling the repurposed lines to Utica Marcellus Texas Pipeline. Both Tennessee Gas and UMTP are subsidiaries of Kinder Morgan.

  • Support Grimes to continue good work for Kentucky
    There is an important election coming up on May 19. Please vote!
    I have been blessed to have been allowed to serve the good people of Marion County for a little over two terms as your judge/executive. In my years of government service, I have met, and served with a lot of political folks, but not a lot of them are true public servants. I can honestly say that Alison Grimes is one of those “servant leaders.” She puts the people first in everything she does.

  • Next year, Kentucky’s tourism industry will mark a major milestone when Mammoth Cave celebrates the 200th anniversary of its first commercial tour.
    The world’s longest cave is our country’s second-oldest paid attraction, trailing only Niagara Falls, and it and the surrounding national park have since become a major destination. It draws more than two million visitors a year above ground, and about a fourth of those tour the sights below.