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Opinion

  • Here in Kentucky, there are children living in deplorable conditions in their own homes – victims of child abuse and neglect. Sometimes we hear their stories when it’s too late. Other times, they are rescued because a concerned family member or neighbor reports the suspected mistreatment and the children are removed from these homes.

    When removed, where do these children go? Is there a warm bed, a good meal and a loving family that awaits to comfort them after their ordeal? Because of parents around Kentucky, there is. 

  • For nearly 150 years now, our nation has set aside a day to remember those who paid the ultimate price to protect our freedom.

    It is perhaps fitting that Memorial Day, which traces its roots to the Civil War, was itself the source of conflict for so many years. It is believed to have begun in the South, when Confederate widows decorated not only the graves of their loved ones but also those of Union soldiers, knowing their families were grieving as well.

  • By Mary Lou Brock

  • The streets of Lebanon are stained with different colors from Saturday’s Color in Motion 5K. It’s likely many Kentuckians, including hundreds of Marion Countians, are also sporting some colorful residue on different parts of their bodies after participating in the fun event. Heck, some of our four-legged friends probably have some colorful coats, too, after tagging along during the 3.1-mile route, which included color stations where runners were doused with red, orange, purple, green, blue and yellow powdered paint.

  • Background checks for bus drivers

  • Kentucky has gotten a lot of attention over the years when it comes to finding innovative ways to govern.  Our education reforms of the 1990s were hailed as national models, for example, and we are the only state to permanently dedicate half of our annual tobacco settlement payments to agriculture, a move that has played a key role in the industry’s record sales in recent years.

  • Marion County Superintendent Chuck Hamilton’s retirement announcement took me by total surprise last week as I sat, stunned, in the meeting room at the board of education following a mere two-minute executive session Thursday evening.
    All I could do was shake my head in pure disbelief.

  • No matter when spring falls on a calendar, it doesn’t feel like it truly hits its stride until the first Saturday of May, when the greatest two minutes in sports sends another Kentucky Derby winner into the history books.

  • A photo in last week’s edition should have read that Anne-Michelle Hughes, Ja’Kell Johnson and Aundaria Brown performed with the fourth grade during the Glasscock Elementary School student showcase on April 16.

    A story is last week’s edition should have said the Lebanon Main Street Committee is hosting a meeting at 8 a.m. May 8 on the third floor of the David R. Hourigan Government Building.
     

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  • It’s not every day you get escorted inside a school by a tuxedo clad young man.
    I was last week when I attended a phenomenal event at Lebanon Middle School to celebrate the school being named one of the 2013 Kentucky Schools to Watch.
    There were young men in tuxedos.
    There were spotlights.
    There were local dignitaries.
    There was dancing.
    There was confetti.
    And there were lots of cupcakes.

  • They may wear a variety of uniforms and have different areas of expertise, but one quality binds all first responders: They’re the ones who immediately run toward an emergency when the first impulse is to run away.
    Their invaluable contributions have been highlighted in recent weeks in the aftermath of the Boston bombings, the ricin-poisoned letters in Washington, D.C., and Mississippi and the explosion at a Texas fertilizer plant.

  • From The State Journal (Frankfort)

    The leading causes of death in the United States are heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory diseases and stroke. Accidents rank fifth on the list.
    Those accidents, however, are deaths caused by unintentional injuries, not by a terrorist incident such as the one that happened Monday, April 15, in Boston.
    The three most common types of accidents that result in death are car wrecks, falls and unintentional poisonings.

  • When it comes to energy, less really is more if it gets the same job done. As our country works to maximize every watt, amp and BTU, it’s worth noting that Kentucky is playing a major role in leading the way.

  • Editor’s note: This is the fifth story in a series about the seven special districts serving Marion County, as identified by the State Auditor’s Office as part of an effort to increase public awareness of how their money is spent. The Enterprise is taking a closer look at the special districts that serve Marion County, how they are funded, and what they do for the community.

  • If you have a cellular phone, you are probably aware that 3G service is available in Marion County, regardless of who your provider is.
    Recently, I received an email asking when 4G is coming.
    I guess that’s an inevitable question since wireless service advertisements are touting 4G devices and networks. As we all know, that doesn’t mean that service is available everywhere.
    I sent emails to both AT&T and Bluegrass Cellular last week to try to find out more about 4G. Here’s what I’ve heard so far.

  • Over the last generation, Kentucky has seen a lot of success when it comes to boosting the education level of our workforce.
    Since 1994, according to the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE), the number of those employed who have a bachelor’s degree has jumped 80 percent, while those with a high school diploma or less has dropped by more than a tenth.
    That’s a trend that needs to continue, because CPE estimates that, by the year 2020, more than half of Kentucky’s jobs will require at least some college experience.

  • In the April 3, 2013 edition, a wedding announcement for Justin and Brittney Clark should have listed his parents’ address as Bowling Green. Also, Daniel Gordon was identified incorrectly as Daniel Rakes.

    A news story in the April 3 edition should have read that Adrienne and Candace Tucker, both 19, of Campbellsville were cited for violations of the social host ordinance. They were not arrested.