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Opinion

  • The fall and football season is finally upon us. Kids are back in school, the weather is (finally) cooling down, and the leaves are already beginning to change. I may be biased, but I think Kentucky has one of the prettiest autumns in this region of the country. After a hot summer and the temperature and our taste buds changing, it is a welcome opportunity to get back outdoors.
    With the autumn season comes fall festivals, and I am happy to report there are many events happening all around the 14th Senate District including the ones listed below:

  • I’m sitting in my living room with a man I’ve only met once before. He is a perfectly nice person, but he’s the guy you only want to meet once, otherwise it means you’ve got trouble. Having him here today means trouble for me. The man in my living room is the Internet technician. And he’s here to fix what’s broken.

  • If there is one theme binding the numerous festivals that take place across the commonwealth each year, it’s that if we raise it, grow it or use a lot of it, there’s almost certainly a community that celebrates it.
    Most of these festivals take place over a 10-week period that begins in late August and runs through Halloween, and food is often the focal point. During that time, you can find events dedicated to apples, country ham, sorghum, bourbon, honey and barbecue.

  • By Carter Dyson

    In early September, Gov. Matt Bevin and Kentucky Labor Cabinet Secretary Derrick Ramsey announced the launch of a new apprenticeship campaign: “Kentucky Trained. Kentucky Built.” With a goal of helping more Kentucky businesses leverage registered apprenticeships to meet their workforce needs, the campaign is welcome news in the Lincoln Trail region and across the state.

  • Sept. 26 is Mesothelioma Awareness Day. The Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation selected this date and encourages congress, states and cities to acknowledge it. We cooperate with the Meso Foundation in memory of our younger son, Todd Hall (1967-2006) who was a victim of this rare and deadly cancer caused by asbestos exposure.
    When we learned that former Kentucky State Representative Ron Cyrus had died of mesothelioma we thought the Kentucky Legislature might honor his memory by officially recognizing Sept. 26 as Mesothelioma Awareness Day in Kentucky.   

  • Have you ever suffered from an addiction?

  • On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: Sept. 11.
    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news. It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.

  • As we transition into September and children are settling into their school year routines, I am excited to participate once again in the America’s Legislators Back to School Program. Hosted by the National Conference of State Legislators (NCSL), the program helps legislators educate young constituents in their classrooms on the values of civic participation and the legislative process.

  • By Hannah Wilson

  • By Megan Stith

    Employment is the path to economic self-sufficiency, a source of dignity and the key in our fight to end poverty. Yet, at the same time our businesses are creating more and more job opportunities, many in our communities are willing and able to work but face barriers to employment.

  • At their core, the major American holidays are bound by a common thread: They remind us of who we are and what we stand for, each and every year.
    While the Fourth of July celebrates our founding and freedom, Memorial Day and Veterans Day call on us never to forget the high price paid for those enduring gifts. Thanksgiving gives us a moment among loved ones to appreciate the many good things in our lives, and on Labor Day, which arrives this weekend, we pay tribute to the hard work that made our nation what it is today.

  • It was almost the end of December when we traveled from Bladon Springs, Alabama to Gulf Shores. My wife, Emily, and I had landed a park hosting job almost by accident, and we were excited. We had just spent our first full month in our RV. Bladon Springs, though a nice place for us to stay, had been too secluded. Too lonely. And at times, too eerie.
    The winter was getting colder, but we thought going further south would change all that.
    It didn’t.

  • Given the chance, our dog, Winnie, will chase any critter. She usually goes after birds because they are the most plentiful, even though they are the hardest to catch. Rabbits taunt her every now and then, and she’s even gotten within inches of one or two. We don’t like it when she chases cats, but they are usually aware of her a solid 50 feet before Winnie is aware of them.

  • By Mo Miller
    Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board

    There is no doubt that our region has a strong connection to and appreciation for our nation’s military. The men and women who serve our country are part of the fabric of our community due in large part to our proximity to Fort Knox. That’s why in 2012, when veterans faced above average unemployment, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Development Board set out to determine why and how we and our regional partners could work together with leaders at Fort Knox to change that.   

  • Before the mid-1970s, special education in our country’s public schools was all but non-existent. Many students were either outright denied the opportunity to attend because of their disability, or they received inferior instruction if they were able to enroll.

  • Too often we hear of terrorist attacks and deadly incidents that in many cases could have been prevented or somehow lessened. Strange and erratic behavior is sometimes the first clue to a potential danger posed to our community. That is why the Kentucky Office of Homeland Security developed the “Eye on Kentucky” program.

  • The Russians historically protected the Christ culture, not the Bolshevik-Nazi communists. WWII Nazis took off their uniforms and became Reds.
    Communism falls in Russia and is imported to America but it is called globalism. All global systems are meant to control regular people. These moguls care nothing about you, only control. Money equals power.

  • When will Trump, his family and supporters see just how unhinged, ignorant of our constutional rights, the rule of law, and destructive his constant bashing of the media and others is? While Hilary Clinton is not perfect, she is qualified and a reasonable, sane human being. How many prominent Republicans and military professionals denouncing him will it take? Even if Trump loses this election, which he is currently, he will have done serious damage to our democratic republic with his hateful rhetoric.
    Elizabeth Wallen
    Springfield

  • Imagine for a moment that you have just been released from jail. You’re carrying a plastic bag with a change of underwear, socks and a toothbrush. Your pockets are empty. Your wallet would be, too, if you owned one. You have no family. The friends you have are still doing drugs. You know if you go to them you will be tempted by your previous addiction. But you’ve changed. You’re trying to better yourself. You don’t want to fall back into those old habits.  

  • Have you ever had a teenager screaming and cursing in your face, throwing things as he stormed through the house? Breaking cabinets? Kicking in doors? Have you ever had to watch a teenager scream and curse at your spouse and you weren’t allowed to do anything about it?
    It’s tough to deal with, let me tell you.