.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Voters across the Bluegrass state will vote in our first Republican caucus on March 5, which will select delegates to go to the National Republican Convention in July. Our votes will now count more than ever since we are casting our votes along with other early states.

  • By Kim Huston

    The automotive industry has not only completed its recovery from the Great Recession, but also broke light vehicle sales records in 2015. With this growth, communities in the Lincoln Trail region and across the Commonwealth are positioned to realize even greater opportunities.

  • In last week’s edition, we reported that Peggy Downs, 55, of 830 Arthur Mattingly Road in Lebanon filed to run for the District 4 school board seat, currently held by Michael Cecil. We incorrectly reported that Downs has ran for the position twice. Actually, she has only ran for the school board seat once, which was in 2008.

    On page A16 a cutline incorrectly identified a photo. The cutline said the group singing was the Bethel AME Methodist Choir. It should have said the First Baptist Church of Campbellsville.
     

  • Hollywood stars, national organizations and winter weather greeted the Kentucky General Assembly during week six of the 2016 Session. With many guests, packed committee meetings, and energetic rallies, it was another exciting week in Frankfort.
    The national organization Save The Children, which promotes early childhood learning, had its Action Network President Mark Shriver and actress Jennifer Garner testify in Frankfort on behalf of the organization and their work throughout Kentucky.

  • By Kenny Fogle

    It’s called the “WOW” factor. When you see something for the first time or see it in a new light from what you had expected, you just have to stand back and appreciate what is in front of you. It happens all the time, but it still is a great feeling every time it does. 

  • Hello, my name is Stevie Lowery and I am a Facebook addict.
    Correction: I was a Facebook addict.
    At 12:01 a.m. on Jan. 1, Facebook and I went on a break.
    And, to the surprise of many, including myself, we have not reunited.
    In fact, our “break” might end up being a “breakup.”
    And, I’ll tell you why. I feel like I owe my 1,000-plus “friends” an explanation.

  • The fifth week of the 2016 legislative session in Frankfort was historic in a number of ways. Governor Matt Bevin signed his first piece of legislation, Senate Bill 4. We also said goodbye to former State Senator and civil rights activist, Georgia Davis Powers.

  • Week four of the Kentucky General Assembly marked a momentous occasion for our state. Governor Matt Bevin gave his first State of the Commonwealth Budget Address, laying out a plan that will guide Kentucky out of the financial mire that has lingered for the past several years after the recession.

  • By Diane Kelley
    Director of Hardin County Adult Education

    As an adult education instructor, I’ve seen firsthand how education leads to a higher standard of living and an increased quality of life.
    With that in mind, the Lincoln Trail region has reasons to take pride in our Adult Education programs and the students who access these programs.

  • Advocates for animals
    Susan Spicer is one of the bravest people I know. Why? Because she goes to bat for the voiceless — animals that are abused and neglected. When people see this “behavior,” like people starving their animals, or confining them without shelter, or throwing them out a car window, they call her to deal with the people doing the harm. Even hearing about what people do to their pets is hard to listen to, much less to speak to them and get them to stop.

  • By Carrie Truitt
    Volunteer Manager/Hosparus Green River

  • The Republicans keep claiming Bernie Sanders can't pay for it ... but he can ... the costs and the premiums must balance each other to avoid deficits ... BUT ... and here is the key that NOBODY is talking about ... you can either balance the scale by increasing the premiums (we DON'T want that) ... OR ... you reduce the cost of the health care industry (we DO want that).

  • By Eliza Jane Schaeffer
    Guest columnist

  • Saturday morning I witnessed something so amazing and beautiful it almost took my breath away and made me cry all at the same time.
    I visited the Working the Puzzle for Autism Center to take photos of the children participating in a painting activity. I knew there would be some great photo opportunities there. But, to be honest, I just like going to the center. It’s such a happy place, and I love watching and interacting with the children. They are so very special.

  • By G. B. Dixon

    If we have learned anything during the festive months just passed, it is that second helpings are the natural consequence of a pleasing first course. 'Seconds' divert us for a little while longer from life's toils and woes, or help us forget the taste of some preceeding yuck. Where the first is good, so generally goes the second. Such promises to be the case when Kentucky Classic Theatre brings back its wildly popular production of "Steel Magnolias" this week.

  • Floor votes, committee hearings, and spirited debate highlighted an action-packed second week of session in the Kentucky Senate. Guests from all corners of the Commonwealth were welcomed to Frankfort to speak on behalf of various bills.
    On Thursday, we were visited by hundreds of young and energetic faces celebrating Children’s Advocacy Day, sponsored by Kentucky Youth Advocates. The group hosted a rally in the capitol rotunda where several senate majority members were recognized for their efforts in standing up for Kentucky’s children.

  • An effort to help potentially tens of thousands of Kentuckians truly put their past behind them cleared a key legislative milestone on Friday when the Kentucky House voted to broaden eligibility for criminal expungement.

  • By Virgil McCloud

    Transitioning from military to civilian life, and finding the right fit in the civilian workforce, can be a frustrating and trying experience. As I’ve learned firsthand, leaving the military isn’t just about finding a new job. It’s leaving everything you’ve known for years and entering into new territory.
    Annually, in the Army alone, more than 100,000 soldiers make this transition. Of those, upwards of 3,000 exit from Fort Knox. This past year, I was one of them.