• Where is the parent’s rights at MCHS? Every year MCHS sends out booklets about school policy. When the parents ask to review certain issues, there response is, “Can’t do.” Now they have tapes in every room at school. So, when the parent asks to review the tapes you can’t because there are other students on the tape. You can blur the other students out on any tape.

  • When it comes to keeping us safe, it can be easy to take for granted those who protect us – until tragedy re-reminds us that their job can carry a steep price.
    That was very much on everyone’s mind last week, when House Speaker Greg Stumbo joined with the father of Kentucky State Police Trooper Joseph Cameron Ponder – who was killed in the line of duty on Sept. 13 – to pledge their support for actions that would help reduce the dangers frontline officers all too often face. It is a cause I support as well.

  • By Carrie Bridgman

    When you say the word, “we,” whom are you thinking of? It depends on the context, of course. Most of us spend our time with varied groups of people: family, fellow students/colleagues/participants in some program, people who are paid to serve us (doctors, mechanics, salespeople, etc.), and friends with whom we share interests. How many people in your life fit into each of those categories? 

  • In the Ham Days section last week, the Marion County Chamber of Commerce failed to list Citizens National Bank as a “silver sponsor” and B&D Pressure Washing as a “bronze sponsor.”


  • It may still be early in the school year, but some of the “report cards” the state uses to measure academic progress have already begun to arrive. In general, the news for Kentucky is good, although there is still much room for improvement. Perhaps the best example of that can be found in the growing number of high school students taking and passing Advanced Placement tests, which provide college credit if the score is high enough.

  • Hello, I must be going.
    I cannot stay,
    I came to say
    I must be going.
    I’m glad I came
    but just the same
    I must be going.

    - Groucho Marx as Captain Spaulding in “Animal Crackers”
    (Video here: https://goo.gl/aP2Ebd)

    In light of the questions I’ve been asked during the past week, I will confirm that this will be my final edition as a full-time contributor to The Lebanon Enterprise.

  • Kentucky has a treasured tradition in its unique fall festivals held across the commonwealth. With fall comes the pageantry and showcase of characteristics that make our different regions unique. These are also opportunities that communities use as homecomings for friends and family, who visit, as well as a chance to show tourists some of our local traditions and culture.

  • A man you need to hear

  • It may not be celebrated as much as Independence Day, but Constitution Day is arguably just as important. While July 4 recognizes the birth of our nation, Sept. 17 commemorates the day we established the cornerstone of our government and secured our rights as citizens.
    In the 228 years since that journey began, the U.S. Constitution has become the oldest charter among the world’s major countries and still remains, at 4,400 words, the shortest.

  • By Carter Dyson

    Across Kentucky, employers, educators and community organizations are turning their attention to the manufacturing sector, one of the commonwealth’s most significant job creators and economic engines.
    October is Manufacturing Month in Kentucky and Oct. 2 is the fourth annual national Manufacturing Day. The designation gives manufacturers an opportunity to increase awareness of modern manufacturing, the skills it relies on and the career opportunities it offers.

  • By Clifford E. Falls

    Affordable power can be the lifeblood of businesses and a critical element to growing manufacturing jobs across the U.S. A proposed federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulation regarding ground-level ozone emissions could put the cost of power out of reach for manufacturers and place untold numbers of jobs at risk.

  • In conjunction with National Preparedness Month, September has been designated Preparedness Month in Kentucky. Kentucky’s Office of Homeland Security and Kentucky Emergency Management urge Kentuckians to “Be aware – be prepared – have a plan.”

  • By Amy Morgeson
    Guest columnist

    It’s the most wonderful time of the year…nope not Christmas, September! You have the warmth of summer with a hint of cool in the evenings. The city itself seems happier in September. Street curbs get a cheerful coat of fresh yellow paint. The Main Street flowers are in full bloom. Store windows are ready for Ham Days. The holiday season is coming, but you know the worst of the cold is a few months away. Everyone just feels like celebrating.

  • While the temperature may not feel like fall just yet, many of the traditional signs of the season are starting to arrive.
    One of the most telling is the sheer number of festivals that has already started to take place and will run through Halloween. They are centered on items you might expect – country ham, dairy products, apples and bourbon – and a few more that may seem odd until their history is known.

  • By G.B. Dixon
    With the sublime prompting of a simple downbeat, a new artistic entity has arrived, promising more in the way of things to do in central Kentucky. Under the fluid direction of Dr. Lisa McArthur, Kentucky Classic Orchestra held its inaugural concert before an appreciative crowd of around 100 people Sunday at Centre Square in Lebanon.

  • One of this interim period’s hot button issues is finding a way to stabilize the Kentucky Teachers Retirement System (KTRS) and the Kentucky Employee Retirement System (KRS). KTRS was debated in the waning days of the last General Assembly, and the momentum continues. As a member of the Public Pension Oversight Board, I have had a seat at the table on these issues, continuing to deliberate with the various stakeholders and legislators who want to find a solution.

  • Last week, the United States celebrated the 95th anniversary of women’s right to vote, a milestone made possible by the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Kentucky was the 23rd state to ratify that amendment, but it did not clear its final legislative hurdle until Tennessee became the 36th in Aug. 1920. Interestingly, that decision was a close one, occurring only when a young legislator voted in favor at the request of his mother.

  • By Wendell Lawrence
    It is hard to believe Where Opportunity Knox, a regional initiative to connect 10,000 transitioning veterans and military spouses to jobs and the Greater Louisville Region by the end of 2017, is celebrating its first anniversary in September.  
    In the last year, nearly 1,500 veterans and spouses have been connected with employment opportunities throughout the region and over 130 participating employers have signed up to support this initiative.

  • By G.B. Dixon