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Opinion

  •  As most of you know, House Bill 145, which prohibits indoor smoking in public buildings and workspaces, passed in the House of Representatives this past week. Thank you State Representative Terry Mills for supporting this extremely important piece of legislation for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. It is very satisfying to see a representative of the people working to create a safer atmosphere for the health and well-being of all people.

  • By G.B. Dixon

    Guest columnist 

  •  With an eye on the dwindling days left in this year’s legislative session, the Kentucky House moved virtually all of its top priorities a step forward last week and should have most sent to the Senate by early this week.

  • By G. B. Dixon

    A plume of smoke, a desperate plea, two hearts in love, it's Marion County by the Arabian Sea. The to do this weekend in Lebanon is "Disney's Aladdin, Jr." staged by Kentucky Classic Theatre at Centre Square. There, one of the more familiar narratives in all of literature comes to life three more nights.  

  • Send bombs and bullets, not bodies

  • If the end of a legislative session is about what laws the General Assembly can pass, the beginning is about what the House and Senate hope will be on that list. It’s not a small number this year, with about a dozen major topics expected to be considered by both chambers and many others also vying for passage. Making that process difficult is the fact that there are only 30 working days and the first four were dedicated last month to electing leadership and establishing committees for the next two years.

  • By Carter Dyson

    When automotive supplier Metalsa expanded its workforce last year, company representatives called on Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail in Elizabethtown to find the skilled employees they needed.

  • By Kate Kirzinger, Guest Columnist

  • On Saturday morning, the Marion County Farm Bureau hosted its annual legislative breakfast. This has become a tradition on the last Saturday in January, and it’s one that more people should attend.
    Here’s a few thoughts after eating one (or two) too many doughnuts.
    • Obviously, this is an opportunity for local Farm Bureau members to share their concerns with our state legislators, and for the legislators to share their thoughts on the General Assembly.

  • By G.B. Dixon

    Arts columnist

  • After a three-week adjournment, the 2015 General Assembly convenes this week on Feb. 3 and will go through March 24 if all goes as planned. During the adjournment, I have had a great time visiting many of our schools and teaching about our legislative process and government. Last week, I joined the other members of the Kentucky Public Pension Oversight Board and heard reports from the Kentucky Retirement System and Kentucky Teacher Retirement System representatives on investment performance.

  • The argument for enacting an indoor smoke-free law in Kentucky is simple: Everyone has the right to breathe smoke-free air.
    I would hope even smokers would agree.

  • Smoke-Free Kentucky is making another push for a law to prohibit smoking in indoor workplaces, including restaurants and bars. This time, I should hope the legislation will pass and Governor Steve Beshear will sign it.
    By now, we’ve heard the arguments against the law - tobacco is a legal product, businesses should be allowed to decide if they will or won't allow smoking. We also understand why people who rely on tobacco to make a living might be concerned about this kind of law.

  • Late last week, Kentucky lost one of its true statesmen with the passing of former U.S. Senator Wendell Ford.
    Since then, there have been numerous accolades about his many accomplishments in Washington, D.C. – from helping to write and pass the Family and Medical Leave Act to promoting Kentucky’s signature coal and tobacco industries – but it is worth noting that several actions taken during his time as governor continue to benefit Kentuckians today.

  • Greetings from Frankfort. After a busy and very productive first week of the session, we are in adjournment until Feb. 3. Yet, we still have much work to do. The last date for new bills is Feb. 13, and that means that we are working to see what legislation needs priority and how to move forward efficiently. I have been traveling to Frankfort and meeting with the other leaders to prepare.

  • There may only be 30 working days in this year’s legislative session, but it already seems like there are about twice as many major issues needing to be addressed before the General Assembly wraps up its work in late March.
    Because the state operates under a two-year budget, and our constitution therefore requires larger majorities in the House and Senate to “open it up” in odd-numbered years, few of the bills filed have a significant financial impact.
    Even so, that does not lessen the importance of those that may become law.

  • By Sherman Bowman

    The Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board and the Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail are pleased to announce a new training program to help both job seekers and employers in one of our region’s most promising job sectors – advanced manufacturing.
    Through a grant-funded initiative, called Kentucky Career Center Get Opportunity (KCCGO), we’ve developed intensive, no-cost training to help up to 90 job seekers start or re-enter their career in manufacturing.

  • I don’t know about you, but my mind has been consumed with “bad news” lately.
    So, if I may, I’m going to lighten the mood for a bit.
    I want to tell you a story about a fish named “Dempsey.”
    Dempsey is no ordinary fish.
    For starters, he’s a parrot cichlid, and his ancestors were first created in Taiwan around 1986.
    He’s “manmade” so to speak.

  • The Kentucky General Assembly convened its 2015 Regular Session this week, with more than 200 bills already filed and ready for consideration.
    In many years past, the first week of this off-year “short” session was spent mainly on formalities like electing leaders and appointing committees, with the real work of passing bills beginning in February. But with only 30 days to accomplish so much, I’m proud to say the Senate got down to business passing legislation.