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Opinion

  • By John G. Mattingly
    Marion County Judge/Executive

    There is no way to make it right, you can't explain it, a senseless act of violence will change a community like no other event. The tragic death of Deputy Carl Anthony Rakes last week shocked the Marion County community to its very core. It is a shame that it takes a real tragedy to bring a community together. Marion County showed how much they can and do care about their fellow citizens, and especially those who seek to protect them on a daily basis.

  • This week, as we turn our focus to family, food and - for some - football, now is the ideal time to pause for a moment to recall all for which we are thankful.
    At the state level, the good news is that some silver linings have begun to shine through after several especially tough years.
    The 12 months between Sept. 2011 and 2012, for example, saw Kentucky add 47,000 jobs - our highest year-to-year total since 2000. Only South Dakota had a larger percentage increase during the same 12-month period.

  • A story in the Nov. 7 print edition of the Enterprise should have read that Ronnie Ray Stutes, a recent escapee from Marion Adjustment Center, stole a vehicle in Bardstown, was accused of participating in a bank robbery and was arrested in Louisville. The print edition incorrectly reported that another escapee William Paul Monroe had taken the vehicle . Monroe was captured in Harlan County prior to Stutes escape.

    A photo in the Oct. 31 edition of the Enterprise misidentified Kendell Johnson.

  • Over the last two decades, Kentucky has built a national reputation for its willingness to blaze new paths when it comes to education. Early this month, we took another major step forward with the release of the latest round of school accountability scores.

  • As I voted on Nov. 6, I almost laughed out loud when I saw the question asking voters to amend Kentucky's Constitution to protect the right to hunt and fish.
    My first thought was protect hunting and fishing from whom, or what?
    Trying to keep people in Kentucky from hunting and fishing is like trying to get diehard UK basketball fans to not wear blue. It ain't gonna happen.
    I've read the arguments behind the amendment - the preservation of a God-given right to harvest game and keep animal herd population numbers in check.

  • On Sunday, hundreds of people gathered at Lebanon National Cemetery to honor the military veterans who have served our country in times of war and times of peace. As usual, the crowd was filled with many of those veterans and their families.
    I couldn't help but wonder what those veterans' families know about their service.
    My grandfather on my father's side, Sylvester Lega, was a World War II veteran. He died a few months before I was born, but I know from conversations with my grandmother that he said very little about his time in the service.

  • Veterans Day is Sunday. It's often a time we think about individuals who have or are serving overseas, whether as part of an active military operation or at one of the United States military bases throughout the world.
    But serving one's country doesn't always mean leaving its borders.
    In the latter half of 1961, the construction of the Berlin Wall started as tensions mounted between the West and the Soviet Union. What became known as the Berlin Crisis prompted several soldiers to be called up for duty.

  • A team photo of the Lebanon Cowboys on page B8 of the Oct. 31 Enterprise should have been credited as a submitted photo.

  • By now, we should know who our next President of the United States will be (emphasis on should). And, with the exception of a few undecided voters, everyone had an opinion regarding the candidates... including kids.
    Students in Tammy Parman's fifth-grade class at Calvary Elementary School recently weighed in on who they felt would make the best president. And, although the election is over (or should be, at least) we still want to share the students' views on Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.

  • If you get mail with "Paid for by Kentucky Family Values" on it, just throw it away.
    Terry Mills wants the ads to stop, too. He wrote in a statement to the Enterprise that he does not support the ads. He has contacted Kentucky Democratic Party leaders to say he does not want the negative ads. They told him they could not stop them.

  • This month marks 30 years since the Marion County Animal Shelter was first opened.

    It's a place I remember well.

  • By Jodi George

    Guest columnist

    In 1992, only 51 Marion County residents voted in the Republican primary.  

    Today, the Marion County GOP's membership exceeds 2,000 registered voters.  

    A group that once could squeeze into a phone booth now needs a real meeting room to gather.

  • If you get mail with "Paid for by Kentucky Family Values" on it, just throw it away.

    Terry Mills wants the ads to stop, too. He wrote in a statement to the Enterprise that he does not support the ads. He has contacted Kentucky Democratic Party leaders to say he does not want the negative ads. They told him they could not stop them.

  • We can stop the cycle in our community

    October is domestic violence awareness month and I am intrigued by our community's tolerance with such a horrific act. I truly don't believe we understand the catastrophic damage one causes when they choose to physically and mentally abuse another person.

  • The Marion County Rescue Squad is asking for the community's assistance in helping raise money for the purchase of a new hydraulic pump and special cutters to be used on motor vehicle accidents involving entrapment. Marion County Rescue is made up of a group of very dedicated volunteers and we must rely on our community for help with funding.

  • By Kandice Lanham

    Marion County's middle schools will celebrate Arts & Humanities Day during the New Harmonies Smithsonian exhibit from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Oct. 29, at Centre Square. The showcase will feature visual arts, dance and a combined band and chorus performance by Lebanon and St. Charles middle schools. The theme will be Kentucky folklore, using different genres of music. A final performance will be at 6 p.m.

  • A group called Kentucky Family Values started running radio ads last week criticizing Bill Pickerill, the Republican candidate for state representative.
    KFV claims that, as a city councilman, Pickerill approved a "300 percent" pay raise for himself, but denied pay increases for local police officers. As a result, officers left Lebanon for other communities and made the city unsafe.
    "It's not even a half-truth," Pickerill said in a phone interview.

  • I am worried about the state of our nation. I am fearful for my children's future. Every day "pop culture" mocks our country's history and the values America was founded on. News organizations, "think tanks" and the ivory towers of America's universities are asking, "Is the Constitution still relevant?" Why is this happening? It is a leadership problem.

  • Fourteen years ago last Sunday, a man riding a bicycle across the wind-swept prairie in Cheyenne, Wyo., discovered the tiny, nearly frozen, body of Matthew Shepard beaten to a pulp and crucified on a deer fence... barely clinging to life... the only place on his face not covered in blood washed clean by a tear from his right eye that had run down his cheek. Matthew could have been your son, or your brother, or maybe, your friend...