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Opinion

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    Editor’s note: Dudley Friend Adle Jr., who ran unopposed for the constable, sent the following letter to Marion County Clerk Karen Spalding in light of the Marion County Fiscal Court’s recent decision to require him to post a $2 million surety bond.

    The Marion County Fiscal Court met on Nov. 15 to discuss the constable position in District E. At that meeting they concluded that a surety bond of $2,000,000  would be required for the position of constable in District E.

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  • Earlier this summer a Public Pensions Task Force began meeting to discuss possible solutions to the unfunded liability in the Kentucky retirement system.  After several months of consideration and discussion with local and national experts, we approved an eight-point proposal outlining suggestions to put Kentucky's public retirement system back on sound financial footing.
    We looked at ways to pay down the pension debt, provide immediate relief to cash-strapped budgets and create a new pension system that is sustainable and secure.

  • When I was leaving Saturday evening's performance of "The Desperate Director" at Angelic Hall, spectators said watching the play was much better than sitting at home clicking through the channels on the television.
    I agree.
    Unfortunately, too few people took advantage of the live entertainment this past weekend right here in our hometown.

  • If you all hear about someone losing a piece to a Jazzie mobility  scooter, I found it on US 68 between Lebanon and Gravel Switch.
    I have it in my possession and would gladly return it to its rightful owner.  
    C.A. Roller Sr.
    Stanford
    clarence1946roller@att.net

  • Each fall, not long before Thanksgiving, the General Assembly's administrative staff offers an in-depth look at some of the issues it believes could be debated during the legislative session that begins each January.
    The report comes from the 15 main committees that vote on legislation, and while no one can predict what ultimately will become law, this analysis gives us a better idea of what may need to be addressed.

  • "The hero."
    I got goose bumps every time I heard those two words Saturday during Marion County Sheriff's Deputy Anthony Rakes' funeral.
    Anytime an officer referred to Deputy Rakes, he or she wouldn't say his name. Instead, they would say, "the hero."

  • In last week's edition, a photo misidentified the Glasscock Elementary School "Mallet Madness" group as the West Marion Elementary School Choir.

  • Marion County is reeling.
    On Saturday,  we said goodbye to Marion County Sheriff's Deputy Anthony Rakes, who was killed in the line of duty early Nov. 14. Rakes was living a lifelong dream of working in law enforcement.
    Rakes' death would be enough to leave us saddened, but his death was one of a string of tragic events that have plagued our county over the last two weeks.

  • By John G. Mattingly
    Marion County Judge/Executive

    There is no way to make it right, you can't explain it, a senseless act of violence will change a community like no other event. The tragic death of Deputy Carl Anthony Rakes last week shocked the Marion County community to its very core. It is a shame that it takes a real tragedy to bring a community together. Marion County showed how much they can and do care about their fellow citizens, and especially those who seek to protect them on a daily basis.

  • This week, as we turn our focus to family, food and - for some - football, now is the ideal time to pause for a moment to recall all for which we are thankful.
    At the state level, the good news is that some silver linings have begun to shine through after several especially tough years.
    The 12 months between Sept. 2011 and 2012, for example, saw Kentucky add 47,000 jobs - our highest year-to-year total since 2000. Only South Dakota had a larger percentage increase during the same 12-month period.

  • A story in the Nov. 7 print edition of the Enterprise should have read that Ronnie Ray Stutes, a recent escapee from Marion Adjustment Center, stole a vehicle in Bardstown, was accused of participating in a bank robbery and was arrested in Louisville. The print edition incorrectly reported that another escapee William Paul Monroe had taken the vehicle . Monroe was captured in Harlan County prior to Stutes escape.

    A photo in the Oct. 31 edition of the Enterprise misidentified Kendell Johnson.

  • Over the last two decades, Kentucky has built a national reputation for its willingness to blaze new paths when it comes to education. Early this month, we took another major step forward with the release of the latest round of school accountability scores.

  • As I voted on Nov. 6, I almost laughed out loud when I saw the question asking voters to amend Kentucky's Constitution to protect the right to hunt and fish.
    My first thought was protect hunting and fishing from whom, or what?
    Trying to keep people in Kentucky from hunting and fishing is like trying to get diehard UK basketball fans to not wear blue. It ain't gonna happen.
    I've read the arguments behind the amendment - the preservation of a God-given right to harvest game and keep animal herd population numbers in check.

  • On Sunday, hundreds of people gathered at Lebanon National Cemetery to honor the military veterans who have served our country in times of war and times of peace. As usual, the crowd was filled with many of those veterans and their families.
    I couldn't help but wonder what those veterans' families know about their service.
    My grandfather on my father's side, Sylvester Lega, was a World War II veteran. He died a few months before I was born, but I know from conversations with my grandmother that he said very little about his time in the service.

  • Veterans Day is Sunday. It's often a time we think about individuals who have or are serving overseas, whether as part of an active military operation or at one of the United States military bases throughout the world.
    But serving one's country doesn't always mean leaving its borders.
    In the latter half of 1961, the construction of the Berlin Wall started as tensions mounted between the West and the Soviet Union. What became known as the Berlin Crisis prompted several soldiers to be called up for duty.

  • A team photo of the Lebanon Cowboys on page B8 of the Oct. 31 Enterprise should have been credited as a submitted photo.