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Opinion

  • With deer season starting soon there are many does with fawns so young and small that they still have soft spots and some are even newborn. Deer season should be postponed or killing these does banned.
    Also, there is no bear season in Marion County, so if a bear is seen, do not kill it. They are harmless anyway.
    I will never understand how hunting is a sport when high-powered guns with scopes are used against a defenseless animal. If a person needs the meat, that is different. However, health experts are advising eating little.
    Barbara Warner

  • A question arose recently concerning businesses offering discounts to veterans. Should businesses offer, or better yet, should business owners feel obligated to offer a vet a discount on goods and services?
    Let me say that I hold the highest respect for the men and women who served and are now serving in  the armed forces of the United States.
    I especially appreciate the service of Vietnam vets who weren't treated with the utmost respect either during the war or after it ended with the fall of Saigon on April 30, 1975.

  • Grief is a journey that all go through. It can be debilitating. Grief affects us all in many ways emotionally, physically and spiritually. There are times in life that we can get stuck in grief and are not sure how to get through the heartbreak. Fall will soon be here and holidays are just around the corner, both are difficult when dealing with loss.

  • I have to acknowledge a random stranger for some motivation and inspiration.
    Last Tuesday I was in Frankfort, and while I waited for Mike Haydon's memorial service to begin, a man behind me was engaged in a conversation that piqued my interest.
    The word "scrutiny" is what drew me in.
    The man, who I didn't know, was telling those around him that now was a good time to do something because there was less scrutiny than in the past because newspapers were going broke.
    Now, let me put a few things out there before I dissect what I heard.

  • A group of Kentucky legislators are questioning proposed education standards for Kentucky students. Apparently, in order to meet national education standards, students should be taught about evolution.
    For a few legislators, this is too much, or it's maybe not enough.
    "I would hope that creationism is presented as a theory in the classroom, in a science classroom, alongside evolution," Sen. David Givens, R-Greensburg, told the Lexington Herald-Leader last week.

  • Kentucky is facing a prescription drug abuse epidemic. You've likely already heard the statistics. Approximately one thousand Kentuckians die each year - that's about three a day - from pain pill overdose. Some reports estimate that one in three Kentuckians has a friend or family member who they say is struggling with prescription drug addiction.

  • By Ken Begley

     

    Unbelievable.

    The other day Mrs. Ann Faye Sallee, my daughter Jenny's unofficial godmother, stopped by the Springfield State Bank's branch out there on Bardstown Road to see Cindy. She told Cindy that we ought to go see "Always Patsy Cline" playing down at the Opera House. Ann Faye is a devoted follower of the Central Kentucky Community Theatre and said this play is the absolute best they have ever done.

  • Many moons ago, I took a sociology class as a student at Western Kentucky University. I don't remember a lot from that class, but I do remember a discussion on culture shock and future shock.

    Culture shock occurs when someone finds themselves in a different culture, and the differences between what a person knows and understands and the new culture becomes disorienting to that person.

  • Ban assault weapons

    Days of prayer and reflection are appropriately called for by President Obama after the massacre in Aurora, Colo.

    This was a welcome first step. But it is only the first step.

    Moral, responsible, principled leadership that addresses the ongoing slaughter of people around the United States is long past due. 

  • William "Buster" Mattingly is not a man who brags about what he has done, but as we have learned, what he has done is worth talking about.
    Mattingly entered the Marines Corps in 1944, just a few years after President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order requiring the military to allow anyone to serve regardless of race. That order may have opened the doors for African-Americans, but it did not end the attitudes that had kept many of them out of the service.
    Nevertheless, Mattingly enlisted, and he was sent to Camp Lejeune, N.C. - well, almost.

  • I oppose the death penalty for Aurora shooter James Holmes (and all murderers) -- it's too damn good! But so are prisons' libraries and weight rooms. Make him repay society via:
    1.) Work: sort garbage for recycling, dig ditches for America's infrastructure, pick crops for America's farmers;
    2.) Tests: new drugs, treatments, surgical techniques, food additives (eliminate animal tests, PETA!);
    3.) Donations: blood weekly, spinal fluid and marrow monthly, half his liver annually (it grows back), one kidney/lung/eye, etc.

  • If you asked my wife if I were addicted to my cell phone, she would shout, "YES" before the question ventured past your teeth.
    With that comes an incessant need to check social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.
    A lot of times I like to try to craft witty Facebook status updates. I didn't say I was witty, I just said I like to try.
    So the other day when I pulled up to the Manton Music Jam, the cobwebs in the part of my brain in charge of Facebook status updates slowly broke loose. I'm pretty sure there was a poof of dust.

  • We all have a story. Now we can all be part of changing that story.
    Taylor Regional Hospital is doing something very exciting. They are participating in an American Cancer Society study to help pinpoint what causes cancer.
    Can you imagine a world without cancer? I hope I live to see that day.
    I still remember how I felt when I heard my grandfather, and then later my grandmother, had cancer. I had a feeling that their lifespan would be cut short by the terrible disease.

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    We all have a story. Now we can all be part of changing that story.

    Taylor Regional Hospital is doing something very exciting. They are participating in an American Cancer Society study to help pinpoint what causes cancer.

    Can you imagine a world without cancer? I hope I live to see that day.

  • Submitted by the National Association of Conservation Districts

    This summer, Kentucky has been hit hard by a severe drought, with serious impacts on crop production across the state. The latest precipitation summary shows the region of Marion County having a 7.29-inch rainfall deficit.

  • If you asked my wife if I were addicted to my cell phone, she would shout, "YES" before the question ventured past your teeth.

    With that comes an incessant need to check social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

    A lot of times I like to try to craft witty Facebook status updates. I didn't say I was witty, I just said I like to try.

  • I oppose the death penalty for Aurora shooter James Holmes (and all murderers) -- it's too damn good! But so are prisons' libraries and weight rooms. Make him repay society via:

    1.) Work: sort garbage for recycling, dig ditches for America's infrastructure, pick crops for America's farmers;

    2.) Tests: new drugs, treatments, surgical techniques, food additives (eliminate animal tests, PETA!);

  • William "Buster" Mattingly is not a man who brags about what he has done, but as we have learned, what he has done is worth talking about.

    Mattingly entered the Marines Corps in 1944, just a few years after President Franklin Roosevelt signed an executive order requiring the military to allow anyone to serve regardless of race. That order may have opened the doors for African-Americans, but it did not end the attitudes that had kept many of them out of the service.

  • I've not gone on one run since June 14 that I haven't thought about Sarah Roberts Hart.

    On June 14, she was on her morning jog in Russell County when she was attacked and killed. Her tragic story has struck a nerve with people all over the country, especially with fellow runners like myself.

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    By Linda Ireland, Landmark News Service