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Opinion

  • Veterans Day is Sunday. It's often a time we think about individuals who have or are serving overseas, whether as part of an active military operation or at one of the United States military bases throughout the world.
    But serving one's country doesn't always mean leaving its borders.
    In the latter half of 1961, the construction of the Berlin Wall started as tensions mounted between the West and the Soviet Union. What became known as the Berlin Crisis prompted several soldiers to be called up for duty.

  • A team photo of the Lebanon Cowboys on page B8 of the Oct. 31 Enterprise should have been credited as a submitted photo.

  • By now, we should know who our next President of the United States will be (emphasis on should). And, with the exception of a few undecided voters, everyone had an opinion regarding the candidates... including kids.
    Students in Tammy Parman's fifth-grade class at Calvary Elementary School recently weighed in on who they felt would make the best president. And, although the election is over (or should be, at least) we still want to share the students' views on Barack Obama and Mitt Romney.

  • If you get mail with "Paid for by Kentucky Family Values" on it, just throw it away.
    Terry Mills wants the ads to stop, too. He wrote in a statement to the Enterprise that he does not support the ads. He has contacted Kentucky Democratic Party leaders to say he does not want the negative ads. They told him they could not stop them.

  • This month marks 30 years since the Marion County Animal Shelter was first opened.

    It's a place I remember well.

  • By Jodi George

    Guest columnist

    In 1992, only 51 Marion County residents voted in the Republican primary.  

    Today, the Marion County GOP's membership exceeds 2,000 registered voters.  

    A group that once could squeeze into a phone booth now needs a real meeting room to gather.

  • If you get mail with "Paid for by Kentucky Family Values" on it, just throw it away.

    Terry Mills wants the ads to stop, too. He wrote in a statement to the Enterprise that he does not support the ads. He has contacted Kentucky Democratic Party leaders to say he does not want the negative ads. They told him they could not stop them.

  • We can stop the cycle in our community

    October is domestic violence awareness month and I am intrigued by our community's tolerance with such a horrific act. I truly don't believe we understand the catastrophic damage one causes when they choose to physically and mentally abuse another person.

  • The Marion County Rescue Squad is asking for the community's assistance in helping raise money for the purchase of a new hydraulic pump and special cutters to be used on motor vehicle accidents involving entrapment. Marion County Rescue is made up of a group of very dedicated volunteers and we must rely on our community for help with funding.

  • By Kandice Lanham

    Marion County's middle schools will celebrate Arts & Humanities Day during the New Harmonies Smithsonian exhibit from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Oct. 29, at Centre Square. The showcase will feature visual arts, dance and a combined band and chorus performance by Lebanon and St. Charles middle schools. The theme will be Kentucky folklore, using different genres of music. A final performance will be at 6 p.m.

  • A group called Kentucky Family Values started running radio ads last week criticizing Bill Pickerill, the Republican candidate for state representative.
    KFV claims that, as a city councilman, Pickerill approved a "300 percent" pay raise for himself, but denied pay increases for local police officers. As a result, officers left Lebanon for other communities and made the city unsafe.
    "It's not even a half-truth," Pickerill said in a phone interview.

  • I am worried about the state of our nation. I am fearful for my children's future. Every day "pop culture" mocks our country's history and the values America was founded on. News organizations, "think tanks" and the ivory towers of America's universities are asking, "Is the Constitution still relevant?" Why is this happening? It is a leadership problem.

  • Fourteen years ago last Sunday, a man riding a bicycle across the wind-swept prairie in Cheyenne, Wyo., discovered the tiny, nearly frozen, body of Matthew Shepard beaten to a pulp and crucified on a deer fence... barely clinging to life... the only place on his face not covered in blood washed clean by a tear from his right eye that had run down his cheek. Matthew could have been your son, or your brother, or maybe, your friend...

  • I wasn't sure what to expect when I applied for a press credential to cover the Oct. 11 Vice Presidential Debate, but I also knew this was an opportunity I might never have again. I went to Danville Thursday knowing only that, no, I would not be sitting in the auditorium, and that Centre College was hosting a festival to coincide with "The Thrill in the 'Ville II."

  • This past July marked my 10th year with The Lebanon Enterprise.

    And in those 10 years, things have changed drastically with this newspaper.

    Actually, the word "drastically" doesn't even begin to describe the number of changes we have experienced here at the Enterprise.

    Our heads are still spinning, to be honest.

    But, there is one thing that hasn't changed.

    Newspapers still matter.

  • By Delena Trent

    October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

    In observance of this The Caring Place put together a checklist of "signs" of a relationship that is headed down a dangerous path. 

  • By Caroline H. Little

    There's an excessive amount of gloom and doom being spread around these days when the talk turns to the future of newspapers. In fact, the mere mention of the future of newspapers suggests that there might not be one. There is no question that the newspaper business has been disrupted. And yet, what the doomsayers fail to see is that newspapers are well on their way to ensuring that a bright future lies ahead.

  • By Charlie Pearl

     

    Last fall I said I wouldn't be doing this again.

    I changed my mind.

    Along with 50 others, I'm participating this week in the ninth annual Governor's Autumn Bicycle Ride Across Kentucky.

  • It's customary for this newspaper to write an editorial the week after Marion County Country Ham Days to praise the Chamber of Commerce and the countless volunteers that make the annual fall festival such a huge success.

    Looking back in our archives, it's interesting to see how the festival has continually grown.