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Opinion

  • Here's the good news.
    Marion County is in the 24th District of the Kentucky House of Representatives. We know this.
    Marion County voters know we will have a choice between the incumbent, Terry Mills, and challenger Bill Pickerill. The problem for the candidates is figuring out what other counties should be part of their campaigns.

  • If you support tourism in Lebanon, last week was a reason to celebrate.
    Not only did the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission welcome its new executive director, but the community was able to celebrate what could become our next tourist attraction.
    The tourist commission had a rough year in 2011 for more reasons than we care to list here, but 2012 has gotten off to a much better start.

  • A lot has been shown recently on television concerning the Mayan calendar's end in 2012 and those who believe that a great disaster will strike the earth in late December of this year. I really do not know anything concerning the Mayan calendar and have not been exposed to any information that would let me believe that the world will end anyway soon. However, based upon history and re-occurring earthquakes, I do believe this area could see a major disruption in the very near future.

  • In a state where horses are supposed to be loved they are being sent to slaughter. There is no way it can be euthanasia. According to Dr. Lester Friedlander, DVM and former chief USDA inspector: "The captive bolt is not a proper instrument for the slaughter of equids, these animals regain consciousness 30 seconds after being struck, they are fully aware they are being vivisected." Visit www.vetsforequinewelfare.org for a White paper giving facts. See the FOIA from USDA there or at www.kaufmanzoning.net for proof of abuses at auctions, during transportation and slaughter.

  • A story in the Feb. 8 edition should have described Fr. Ivo Cecil, the recent deceased former pastor of St. Augustine, as a "gentle giant."

  • By James Roberts
    Landmark News Service

  • Greetings from Frankfort! Anyone visiting the capitol this week would have enjoyed watching democracy in action, both on an individual level as well as a grander level. We passed legislation that made road travel safer for the Amish as well as the "English," we moved forward in education, and we found consensus on congressional redistricting even as legislative redistricting moved to the courts. It was a full week.

  • When the General Assembly began the legislative session last month, there was already broad agreement on what the three biggest issues would be: Writing state government's budget, realigning legislative and Kentucky Supreme Court districts, and limiting if not stopping prescription drug abuse.
    Last week, the latter two took center stage.

  • By Jim Waters

    Transparency not only makes government smaller, less costly and more responsive to its constituents. It saves lives, too.
    The downside: It can embarrass government agencies and the bureaucrats who run them.  
    But ask me if I care more about assisting efforts by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services - which is shut up tighter than a pair of vise grips - to save face or finding out what really happened to Amy Dye, a 9-year-old Western Kentucky girl.

  • The Senate passed several bills last week. Of these bills, three education bills are of particular importance.

  • It was a hectic and busy week in Frankfort as we worked through the challenges of the House and Senate redistricting plans. We are hopeful that this will be resolved soon so that we can dedicate our full attention to budget issues and important legislation needed to move Kentucky forward.

  • Bipartisanship is practically dead, both in Frankfort and in Washington D.C.
    But from time to time, Democrats and Republicans have found issues that bring them together.
    At the state level, we’ve seen a few examples so far.
    - Secretary of Agriculture James Comer, a Republican, and State Auditor Adam Edelen, a Democrat, are working together on an audit of the former ag secretary Richie Farmer’s books.
    - Politicians on both sides of the aisle have recognized something has to be done to stem the tide of prescription pills flooding the state.

  • By Angel Metcalf, Guest Columnist

  • There are some stories, when you hear them, your jaw drops in pure amazement.
    A friend shared a jaw-dropping story with me last week.
    The story, which aired on WLEX18-TV recently, was about 10-year-old Lily Embury of Lexington who is currently training for the Myrtle Beach half marathon.
    A 10-year-old training for a half marathon?
    How can that be?
    Is that even possible?
    I mean, I didn't have the courage to run a half marathon until I was 30. She's only 10! Talk about a blow to the ego!

  • I didn't listen to much bluegrass music growing up. Metallica, Eric B and Rakim, Public Enemy, and AC/DC were more likely to be playing in my cassette deck. (Why does that make me feel old?)

    Like many teenagers, I was convinced that I knew more than I really did, and music was one area I wasn't open to anything but my limited tastes.

  • "Any society, any nation, is judged on the basis of how it treats its weakest members -- the last, the least, the littlest." - Cardinal Roger Mahony

     

    The last...

    The least...

    The littlest...

    Our society is failing to protect our weakest members, and you don't have to look far to recognize that sad fact.

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  • With deepest apologies to Johnathan Swift, I have a modest proposal for the Marion County Animal Shelter and the Marion County Detention Center.
    Let's put some dogs in jail.
    Before you doubt my sincerity (which some of you might if you read my boss's column in last week's Enterprise accusing me - ME - of being sarcastic), hear me out.
    The Marion County Animal Shelter is overrun with dogs, and it's not something they can control.

  • A boys basketball photo on page B1 of last week's edition should have identified the player as junior Vincent Collins.

  • I debated about writing this letter for awhile. I decided this needed to be addressed.
    I had a meeting set up with MCHS Principal Stacey Hall. When I got to his office I peaked my head in the door and asked if he was ready for me. Mr. Hall pushed back in his chair, shrugged his shoulders and said, "Yep." I knew at this point the meeting was not going to go well.