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Opinion

  • Earlier this year, as the General Assembly was putting together the budget to run state government, it was becoming increasingly clear that the state was finally beginning to see some lasting growth.

    That was further confirmed several weeks ago, when one of the state's economists said, "all signs are pointing to the likelihood that the recovery is here to stay."

  • Kentucky is proud to be ranked highly when it comes to basketball, but when it comes to obesity, it's not something we like to brag about.

    But, it's a reality, nonetheless.

    Last year, Kentucky was ranked the sixth fattest state in the country, according to a report from the Trust for America's Health (TFAH). The report states that 31.5 percent of our state's population is obese.

    But, it hasn't always been this way.

  • Each legislative session is inevitably remembered for a key issue or two, and this year's will undoubtedly be recalled for the toughest budget most of us have seen in our lifetime and for taking a comprehensive approach on drug abuse.

    There were several other high-profile issues as well, including the legislature's latest effort to crack down on copper thefts and making sure that the interest on the sizeable federal loan for the state's unemployment insurance fund is covered so businesses wouldn't lose a much-needed tax credit.

  • I'm sure that you've heard the old saying, "One man's junk is another man's treasure." Well, a case of that came up lately. An elderly gentleman who lived in the area began a collection that spanned nearly seven decades. After his health began to deteriorate, he became sick and passed away about two months ago. It was rumored that his collection existed, but those who had seen it told the story as fact.

    What was it this man had been collecting for more than 60 years?

  • By Michael T Mullins

  • Autism event is a success

  • If you had any doubts about the Catholic roots in Marion County, you'll find plenty of evidence in the next few weeks.

    April 22-26, the Sisters of Loretto will be celebrating their 200th anniversary with a homecoming for members of their community at the Motherhouse in Nerinx.

    April 27-29, the Ursuline Sisters of Mt. St. Joseph will hold a centennial celebration, marking 100 years of service in Marion County.

  • Racism in Raywick

    Wow. What's going on in this country lately? Racism is alive and well, I guess...

    First we have the "stand your ground" law in Florida giving rise to a murder of an innocent young black teenager by a white/Hispanic self-appointed neighborhood watch-resident-trigger-happy racist, and now the Raywick, Ky bar owner who thinks all black people should be banned from her bar and property because they have dark skin and therefore will cause trouble?

  • There's no denying that the City of Raywick has a reputation.

    Historically, it's experienced some rowdy times.

    And, in the past, it wasn't always the most welcoming city toward African-Americans.

    In fact, there was a time when it would have been shocking to even see an African-American inside Raywick's city limits.

    But, times have changed. People have changed.

    Or, have they?

  • Imagine getting up earlier on a beautiful day and going somewhere where everyone is excited and in a great mood. The atmosphere is uplifting, knowing you are about to do something fun that is also wonderful for your health. The sense of accomplishment that you will feel at the end is amazing! And anyone can do it!

  • By Ken Begley

    The Bronze Star: the fourth highest wartime medal in the United States Armed Forces, authorized by Congress, awarded to soldiers for heroism or meritorious service in combat.

    That's one heavy medal for a soldier to carry on his chest.

    I've served over 37 years in the military and I can count on one hand the number of soldiers I've known that are Bronze Star award winners.

  • By the Kentucky League of Cities

  • A love for milk and tomatoes might have been Aileen Ferrell's secret to longevity.

    At least, that's what she told me when I interviewed her back in 2002.

    She was ONLY 95 years old at the time.

    I can vividly remember sitting in the kitchen of her huge, historic home on Main Street in Lebanon, and talking with her about her love for milk, vegetables (her favorite being tomatoes), dancing and being a mother.

    She was just delightful, and funny, too.

  • By the time you read this, the 2012 General Assembly will be one day away from concluding. We have completed 59 days of the 60 day session, the last day, April 12, is reserved for considering any Governor's vetoes, if any.

  • Kentucky has received a lot of attention in the past week.

    The hype surrounding the Final Four and Monday night's NCAA men's basketball championship game has focused a national spotlight on the Bluegrass State. While fans of the Cards and Cats certainly had plenty to cheer about, not everything reported has been positive news.

    First, a report about two fans getting in a fight at a dialysis clinic was either trumpeted in the national media as an example of the passion of local fans or something to laugh about.

  • Kentucky has already seen the destructive power of nature as storms and tornadoes have hit several communities across the Commonwealth this spring. There have been lives lost, whole communities devastated and families uprooted from their homes.

  • Industrial hemp hasn't been legal to grow in the United States for decades.
    Not that people haven't wanted to grow it, but right or wrong, hemp has been lumped in with its botanical cousin, marijuana, for a long time.

  • By Ken Begley
    Guest Columnist

    "Can't" never "did" nothing.
    - Unknown author

    . . . is just beginning.

  • In one key way, legislative sessions are a lot like March Madness: The intensity picks up as the number of days winds down. That makes this week, then, the General Assembly's version of the Final Four.