• Excuse me, but I’m about to channel my inner “Pollyanna.”
    For those of you who aren’t familiar with Pollyanna, let me explain.
    In the best-selling novel, Pollyanna, a young orphan, has been taught by her father how to play "the glad game," in which the goal is to "find something about everything to be glad about.”
    I’ve been trying to do this more often in my own life.
    Sometimes it’s difficult, or darn near impossible, but I still try.

  • I thought I was being smart when I slipped my wallet into my front pocket. I remember the smirk on my face when my wife, Emily, told me I should put it in the suitcase because it was all the money we had for this trip.
    “I’ll be fine,” I told her, patting the front of my jeans. A pickpocket would never go for the front one. It would be too easy for me to catch them.

  • By McKenna Dosier
    Summer Intern

    Safeguard American Food Exports Act of 2016, HR 1942, was referred to committee in late April and is currently still there.
    This bill would make the sale or transport of horses and other equines for the purpose of consumption illegal. It would also label them as not domesticated for human consumption.
    Most of you are probably wide-eyed with your jaws on the floor right now. Horse slaughter in the U.S., who knew?

  • As it has for nearly two-and-a-half centuries, our nation will pause on Monday to celebrate its “birth” day, commemorating a time 240 years ago when the Founding Fathers declared our independence.
    Since July 4, 1776, we have weathered a war for our freedom, a war against ourselves, and wars against those who would like nothing more than to see us and our values falter. Although the world has changed in countless ways since Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence, our commitment to protect and promote freedom has never wavered.

  • The Fourth of July gives us all a chance to reflect on our country and to take pride in our nation's enduring principles. It is the day on which the Declaration of Independence was ratified by exemplary visionaries who dared to create a new form of government and new laws for a new people. For the first time it was decided that every person is born with certain God-given rights and that government should have no powers of its own other than those granted to it by the people.  

  • The middle of the year is coming in a couple of weeks on July 2. It’s disappointing, really. I had dreams. Aspirations. But like so many who make New Year’s resolutions and soon forget them, I now regard myself a failure for having neglected the promises I made all those months ago.
    I was going to be a marathon runner. I was going to do 100 pushups without stopping. I was going to read a book every week. I was going to give up sugar for the entire year.

  • On Wednesday June 8, an article was published on Jalopnik, a daily automobile news and gossip site, titled "Horses Are Pointless."
    Naturally, this peaked my interest as a horse person, so I clicked and read.
    The author, who should have stuck to writing about cars, proceeds to "let you know what the experience is like, from someone who's been around the block a few times with the idiotic beasts."

  • I am writing as a citizen of Marion County and as a teacher.
    It is reasonable that facilities need to be adequate and in good repair for the schools to operate effectively. As a citizen I would like a little more detail about what is needed and who determined these needs and their cost.

  • As many of you know, there has been a highly debated proposal to convert a natural gas pipeline that runs through Marion County and five of Kentucky’s six congressional districts into a natural gas liquids (NGL) pipeline. An article from last week’s Danville Advocate reported that several community members that oppose this pipeline conversion were writing letters to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) demanding a full environmental impact study of the Utica Marcellus Texas Pipeline Project.

  • It has often been said that the war against illegal drugs is an ever-changing battlefield. When we seem to be making headway on one front, another tragically opens up. Over the past dozen years, those “fronts” in Kentucky have ranged from meth and synthetic drugs to prescription pain medicine and heroin.
    According to the annual report the state’s Office of Drug Control Policy released last week, a new name has been added to that list: fentanyl.

  • On June 1, I proudly stood with Governor Matt Bevin as he announced additional funding for students participating in dual credit courses with the establishment of the new Kentucky Duel Credit Scholarship. Along with the Workforce Development Secretary Hal Heiner, Governor Bevin announced that $7.5 million will be allocated to school districts across the state for the 2016-17 academic year.
    Dual credit programs allow students to receive both high school and postsecondary academic credit for approved courses, at either a local high school or postsecondary institution.

  • I always smile when I hear the Johnny Cash song in which he claims to have been “everywhere, man.” Though I will never be able to spout off those famous lyrics like the man in black, I still find myself tapping my foot trying to pick out all the different places he lists where I’ve been. Truth is, it’s quite a few. I’ve even lived in some of them.

    “I’ve been everywhere, man.”

  • By Summer Intern McKenna Dosier

    It's no secret that this presidential race has been a hot topic, but one thing that has hardly been mentioned is agriculture.

    Agriculture has been a neglected industry, often being pushed to the back burner by "more important and popular" issues. But I ask, what could be more important than the industry that feeds the world?

  • On June 3, I excused myself from a family function, walked into my house alone and wept. Three days of fielding calls from the media and processing what it meant that St. Catharine College was closing caught up with me. I lie in bed for an hour, numb again, until my wife came home and found me. I sobbed, my body shaking.

    None of this is easy. St. Catharine College and its people have my heart. 

  • Site Selection is not a magazine most of us would keep on our coffee table, but for those in government and business who track economic development, this publication is one not to be missed.

    Fortunately, it has had a lot of good things to say about Kentucky in recent years, and over the past two, it has awarded us its annual Governor’s Cup for having more major job announcements than any other state on a per capita basis.

  • By G. B. Dixon

    "We are going to continue!"
    Such is the absolute resolution, the unequivocal promise, and the certain future of Mid-Kentucky Chorus as told to me by its spokesperson, Susan Spalding, on Sunday. Without hiccup, glitch, or gap the group will continue its traditional four-concert schedule, delighting us, as they have, in the fall, at Christmas, in winter, and spring with a wide selection of music. That schedule is now getting its finishing touches and should be out soon. Are you on the mailing list?

  • Integrity matters
    Last week I was in my car when I heard an announcement for a special-called school board meeting that was to begin shortly. Knowing the Marion County School Board’s pattern for special-called meetings at inopportune times, I decided to attend.
    At the meeting I spoke to Marvin and Mark Gardner, and local attorney Ted Lavit. Let me say that I do not mind being associated with these fine gentlemen and I commend their civic involvement, but to set the record straight, I had no knowledge of their interests in being there.

  • By McKenna Dosier
    Summer intern

    If you haven't heard about the incident at the Cincinnati Zoo over the holiday weekend, you probably live in the jungle with gorillas because it has been all over the internet.
    In case you haven't heard, I'll recap. A 4-year-old boy was visiting the zoo with his mother, who was also apparently watching several other children on the trip. The mother told the boy to hold on to her back pocket while she turned to take a photo.

  • By Erica Osborne

    It's a sadness. A death. A funeral. And sometimes you are angry and sometimes you cry. And sometimes you think you are OK, and then you see one of the Dominican Sisters crying and you start crying again.
    But before you can really wallow in the despair that you feel, the phone rings.
    "Miss Osborne, it's Jacob. I just heard the news. Are you sure the college is really going to close? What am I going to do now?"

  • The General Assembly may be at its busiest during the first several months of the year, when the House and Senate are focused on passing new laws, but the summer and fall months are important as well to the legislative process.