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Opinion

  • By Angel Metcalf, Guest Columnist

  • There are some stories, when you hear them, your jaw drops in pure amazement.
    A friend shared a jaw-dropping story with me last week.
    The story, which aired on WLEX18-TV recently, was about 10-year-old Lily Embury of Lexington who is currently training for the Myrtle Beach half marathon.
    A 10-year-old training for a half marathon?
    How can that be?
    Is that even possible?
    I mean, I didn't have the courage to run a half marathon until I was 30. She's only 10! Talk about a blow to the ego!

  • I didn't listen to much bluegrass music growing up. Metallica, Eric B and Rakim, Public Enemy, and AC/DC were more likely to be playing in my cassette deck. (Why does that make me feel old?)

    Like many teenagers, I was convinced that I knew more than I really did, and music was one area I wasn't open to anything but my limited tastes.

  • "Any society, any nation, is judged on the basis of how it treats its weakest members -- the last, the least, the littlest." - Cardinal Roger Mahony

     

    The last...

    The least...

    The littlest...

    Our society is failing to protect our weakest members, and you don't have to look far to recognize that sad fact.

  •  

  • With deepest apologies to Johnathan Swift, I have a modest proposal for the Marion County Animal Shelter and the Marion County Detention Center.
    Let's put some dogs in jail.
    Before you doubt my sincerity (which some of you might if you read my boss's column in last week's Enterprise accusing me - ME - of being sarcastic), hear me out.
    The Marion County Animal Shelter is overrun with dogs, and it's not something they can control.

  • A boys basketball photo on page B1 of last week's edition should have identified the player as junior Vincent Collins.

  • I debated about writing this letter for awhile. I decided this needed to be addressed.
    I had a meeting set up with MCHS Principal Stacey Hall. When I got to his office I peaked my head in the door and asked if he was ready for me. Mr. Hall pushed back in his chair, shrugged his shoulders and said, "Yep." I knew at this point the meeting was not going to go well.

  • By Linda Ireland

    While my husband Bud and I were attempting to find something decent to watch on television the other night - and it's a desert out there, I tell ya - I started thinking that it has been some years since I compiled a list of my favorite movie quotes.
    Although there are more interesting things to write about - I didn't.
    It is sad to say that there are few quotes worth adding since the last time I updated my list. And it's sad that two of my favorite quotes include the word "taters."
    So here goes:

  • The dictionary states that glasnost, initiated in 1985 under Russian President Mikhail Gorbachev, is the public policy within the Soviet Union of openly and frankly discussing economic and political realities.
    And that's what I recently experienced, but in our neck of the woods.
    Sunday night after church, my wife and I were invited to have dinner with a Ukrainian couple - the Oliynyks - in Campbellsville.
    Ukraine borders Russia to the southwest and is a part of the former Soviet block. It gained its independence in 1991.

  • By G. B. Dixon
    Kentucky Classic Theatre Director

    Is there genuine interest in and support for expanding the arts in Marion County? City and county leaders say yes. They say Lebanon is growing and that the arts are a natural, necessary part of all thriving communities. They believe that along with sports recreation, the arts help give constructive expression to youth's energy and open enriching activities for adults. They say. What do you say? We wish to know.

  • The second week of session saw several significant issues begin to be debated in committees. Drug abuse, weaknesses in child-protective services, and the state's debt level were all topics of discussion. The committee process is intended to inform the legislators of the pros and cons of each bill. Lively debate accompanied each piece of legislation.

  • During the opening days of most legislative sessions in even-numbered years, the primary focus is getting bills moving through committee and readying for the governor's budget proposal.
    As many of you may know, however, this year is somewhat different, as the General Assembly is also taking on the once-in-a-decade task of redrawing the population boundaries for itself, the Kentucky Supreme Court and the state's six congressional seats. It's something all states do after each Census.

  • Single ladies, listen up.
    I have some advice that is going to change your life.
    Thanks to my always helpful and never sarcastic news editor Stephen Lega, I recently had the pleasure of reading an insightful book, "The Woman's Dress For Success Book," written by John T. Molloy. It was published in 1977, two years before I was born.
    Stephen found the book at the Marion County Public Library. Since it was free, he got it for me. He's thoughtful like that. And, apparently, he was trying to give me a not-so-subtle hint about my work attire.

  • Marion County has many reasons to be proud right now.
    We have the top girls basketball team in the state, numerous published (and soon-to-be published) authors, top-performing schools and, of course, the Turtleman, who continues to make the headlines and airwaves for his... ahem... talents.
    Saturday evening, Marion County added another accomplishment to our list.

  • The General Assembly has opened its 2012 session, which means state politics are going to be unavoidable for at least a few more months.
    Last Wednesday, State Sen. Jimmy Higdon and State Rep. Terry Mills took part in the Marion County Chamber of Commerce's legislative breakfast. They discussed some topics that have previously been reported in the Enterprise, such as legislation regarding pill mills, school bus advertising and redistricting.

  • In many ways, the Marion County Industrial Foundation is a mystery. For decades, a collection of local business leaders and public officials have met regularly to help design an economic development strategy for our community.
    Nevertheless, what the foundation does has been unclear to many of us. The foundation provides oversight over the Marion County Economic Development Office, but unlike the Lebanon City Council or the Marion County Fiscal Court, the industrial foundation is not considered a public agency, at least, not in the eyes of the law.

  • If you're like me, you enjoy watching movies. I love to watch some of my favorites when there's nothing else on TV.
    My wife and I have passed this pleasure on to our son, who at 14 years old enjoys many movies that were made when he was very young, or even before he was born.

  • By Erin L. McCoy
    Landmark News Service

    Through the years, the U.S. Patent Office has approved some pretty odd inventions. A mustache guard may have been useful 100 years ago - and its heyday may be coming around again. The toothbrush bracelet and bunny-shaped syringe have a comprehensible, if dubious, logic behind them. Meanwhile, I'm flabbergasted why the robot lunchbox never caught on.