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Opinion

  • When is the last time you got together with thousands of people to do something?
    We don’t mean when were you in a crowd of thousands of people. Maybe you attended a sporting event, ran in a road race or visited a festival, but you — and the rest of the people — weren’t there to work together.
    Well, more than 3,500 people did get together Sunday at TG Kentucky and they did have the same purpose.
    They planted a forest.

  • This week we had exciting news on the high school sports front as the Bardstown Tigers basketball team got the win over Elizabethtown on Tuesday, earning a trip to the Sweet 16 tournament in Lexington. The Tigers’ first game is Thursday night. This time of year is always exciting and I congratulate Bardstown High on the hard work and success.

  • “When you’re a bald woman, you’ve broken the code. You’re different. You’re a rebel, and you always command the attention of the room. Some of them might be staring for the wrong reasons… But hey, at least they’re looking. And let’s be honest: They wish they were as cool as you. It’s fine. Not all of us can be superheroes.”

  • By Kathi Bearden
    Board President, New Mexico Foundation for Open Government
    Former Publisher, the Hobbs-News

    March 16-22 is Sunshine Week nationwide. Take a moment to celebrate. Sunshine Week focuses on the importance of open government. No open government, no democracy. No transparency, no government accountability.

  • When it comes to the state’s budget, the past six years can be summed up in four words: Do more with less.
    There hasn’t been much choice, given that spending has been cut by $1.6 billion since 2008, and the state workforce is the smallest it has been since the 1970s.  Some agencies have seen spending reduced by more than a third, while classroom funding for elementary and secondary education has been held steady for far too long.

  • The Senate continued work this week, and recognized an historic event. On Wednesday, many lawmakers joined thousands of Kentuckians gathered along Capitol Avenue to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s March on Frankfort. It was a cold and blustery March 5 when Dr. King led 10,000 others in a march up to the front door of our Capitol in support of the Kentucky Civil Rights Act.

  • The week may have been cut short by a day because of another round of winter weather, but the Kentucky House of Representatives didn’t let that stand in the way of approving a broad collection of bills.
    Those ranged from the relatively simple – helping sheriff’s departments fill vacancies – to the morally complex, which in this case would build on the current directives people have regarding what life-saving measures, if any, they want taken.

  • Library Legislative Day was held on March 6. This special day was designated for Friends of Kentucky Libraries and librarians across the state to meet with their representatives and talk about issues facing Public Libraries. Library supporters from Marion County had the opportunity to travel to Frankfort that day and speak to Rep. Terry Mills and Sen. Jimmy Higdon. The day was a huge success but alas it is but one day.

  • The article “Nurse practitioners gain more autonomy” in last week’s edition should have identified Jim Osbourne as the practice manager at Family and Internal Medicine Associates in Lebanon, not as Dr. Jim Osbourn. The article also should have said there are 3,700 nurse practitioners in Kentucky.
     

  • I usually keep my mouth shut at school board meetings.

  • March promises many things here in Kentucky; for us in the Senate it is preparing for the most difficult part of the job, the biennial budget. As we await the House to pass its version, legislation continues in our chamber.
    On the Senate floor, I had the privilege of welcoming students from my district who paged for me during sessions. I also had the pleasure of participating in a Q & A session with students from Mercy Academy along with other members of the caucus. It is great to hear the perspectives of our youth.

  • With March the last full month of this year’s legislative session, the Kentucky House and Senate are nearing the point where they will focus less on their own legislation and more on finding common ground with the other chamber. While the House is still finalizing several of its key bills, my fellow representatives and I have already passed a productive list for the Senate to consider.

  • HB 31 will protect private landowners from eminent domain

  • On the front page of this week’s Enterprise, there is story about Aaron Glasscock. Did you read it? If not, I urge you to read it now. While it might seem like the script for a movie, it’s not. It’s all very real.

  • I am often asked about how the Kentucky Lottery funds are used in our state. The money raised has provided $2 billion in scholarship and grants for our students in Kentucky.
    In my Senate District for the fiscal year of 2013, 4176 grants and scholarships that were worth $7,289,377 were awarded to our students. By counties, in my district it is evident that thousands of students are recipients of major funds for higher education.
    • Casey County: 537 grants and scholarships worth $888,230

  • I’m told that Google Glass when viewing a person’s face scans the person. It connects to any database on the person and logs the data. That makes the rumor of license plate auto scanners on Veterans Parkway a less violation of privacy, doesn’t it? The police state/Babylon rising grows.
    A quote by Patrick Henry at the Virginia ratification convention of June 5, 1788 seems once to remember.

  • As we near the end of February, the General Assembly has a predictably full agenda heading into what is always its busiest month of the year.
    Enacting a budget to run state government remains our biggest task. The House’s Appropriations and Revenue Committee is right on schedule, however, with its seven budget review subcommittees close to finishing their modifications of Governor Beshear’s proposal. A vote by the full chamber will be held by early March.

  • The Bluegrass Pipeline is being delayed for at least one year. The Williams Company, one of the partners in the project, announced last week that the Bluegrass Pipeline is now scheduled to be in service by mid-2016.
    That announcement was included in Williams’ 2013 year-end financial report. According to that report, Williams made a net profit of $859 million in 2012. That dropped to $430 million last year.
    I’m no financial analyst, but I suspect a decline in profit of $429 million in one year may have been a factor in the Bluegrass Pipeline delay.

  • This week, every household in the county will be getting a copy of The Lebanon Enterprise.
    To some of you, that’s nothing new. You are a loyal subscriber, and we appreciate you more than you know. You are why we do this. You are our most valued customer.