• Keep art and art teacher at SCMS
    I read with dismay that St. Charles Middle School had eliminated art classes. It might have been nice to give the public a little notice that this decision was pending, so that input from parents and grandparents would have been possible.

  • By Jennifer Brockman

    I am writing in response to Rev. Bridgman’s article “Respect for One Another.”

  • By George L. Faull

    I saw a letter by Carrie Bridgman on “Respect One Another” concerning gay marriage. Her letter is dripping with niceness “no name calling” and encouraging tolerance.
    She says that she is not going to call those who disagree with her “bigots.” She says those of us who disagree with her is because we read the scriptures literally.

  • By Molly McMasters
    Guest columnist

    The Friends of the Library (FOL) is a non-profit organization that exists only to support our local Marion County Public Library. Our group meets every other month (odd numbered months) on the second Thursday of the month at 5:15 p.m. in the small meeting room of the library.

  • Next month, Morehead State University will open what will be the state’s second specialty high school geared toward our best and brightest students.
    The Craft Academy for Excellence in Science and Mathematics will ultimately be home to 120 high school juniors and seniors from across the state, all of whom will have a chance to earn up to 60 college credit hours over a two-year period.

  • By Mo Miller

    The Lincoln Trail region has much to celebrate in workforce and economic development.
    Communities throughout our eight-county region are welcoming new employers and seeing existing employers expand. Businesses like Metalsa in Elizabethtown, Itsuwa in Bardstown, Karbec in Hodgenville and Hendrickson in both Elizabethtown and Lebanon have decided our region is the place to invest and create jobs.

  • By Alexander Campbell

    Editor’s note: The closing of this column may be considered graphic by some readers.

    I am writing in response to the article submitted by Carrie Mook Bridge. In reading this article many no doubt will see that she is a “minister” and take her word for granted. Yet just a cursory read of the Bible such as Jeremiah 28 will show that Hananiah claimed to have strong credentials as a “prophet” as well, yet he was by no means a prophet simply because he held that title.

  • By Kenny Fogle
    Executive Director
    Tri-County Kentucky United Way

  • St. Charles Middle School has eliminated the position of art teacher at their school. This decision leaves a fully equipped art room empty, and the absence of a specialized art teacher to give students the creative opportunities that we as a community have taken for granted.

  • This week, you can read Alexander Campbell’s guest column in response to a piece that appeared last week (“Respect for One Another” http://goo.gl/0eY73e). If you read Campbell’s column (which can be read here http://goo.gl/qZgnOX), then you know he considers homosexuality both sinful and unhealthy.
    Personally, I disagree with about 95 percent of what Campbell wrote, but I support publishing it as I know there are others who share his views. I also want to try to explain why I have a different view of human sexuality than Campbell.

  • As a crime, identity theft is anything but new. It dates back to biblical times, when Jacob pretended to be his brother to deceive their father, Isaac.
    The term itself was coined in the mid-1960s, but it found new life with the popular rise of the internet. Now, barely a month passes without news of another breach of personal information that often affects millions of Americans.

  • By Carrie Mook Bridgman

    Guest columnist


    This is where I’m going to make some people very happy and others very unhappy.  I will not call anyone names if you disagree with me.  I will let you know what I think about this ruling, but the point of this column is to think about how we can move forward from here, no matter our opinion of the ruling itself.

  • About a week ago, state officials released the latest annual report on the quality of a resource we too often take for granted: our drinking water.
    In short, the news is good for those who rely on the treated water provided each and every day by our nearly 450 public utilities.

  • As we work to fuel innovation, create jobs and drive our economy forward, it’s important that we take steps to encourage entrepreneurship.
    “All businesses once were start-ups founded by entrepreneurs,” noted Rick Johnson, program director for Kentucky Innovation Network at the Kentucky Science and Technology Corporation.

  • I’m looking forward to a busy July with my work as your senator, and as a member of the Southern Legislative Conference’s (SLC) Education Committee. The SLC is a nonpartisan organization that brings legislators from 15 states together to discuss issues, share ideas, and work on multi-state problem solving.

  • Last week, Elaine de Leon Angh wrote a blog post in which she had some urgent things to say to people of faith. She wrote about the shooting at Emmanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina:

  • I can’t think of a better place to be for the Fourth of July than in Kentucky. We love our country and we know how to celebrate the fourth! All across the Commonwealth, communities have wonderful and unique traditions - none more so than our cities and communities in the 14th Senate District from Fishing Creek (Casey County) to Fern Creek (Jefferson County).

  • As we ready to celebrate the Fourth of July on Saturday, it’s worth remembering the words President Kennedy spoke at Philadelphia’s Independence Hall a little more than five decades ago.
    “The theory of independence is as old as man himself, and it was not invented in this hall,” he said, “but it was in this hall that the theory became a practice; that the word went out to all, in Thomas Jefferson’s phrase, that ‘the God who gave us life, gave us liberty at the same time.’”

  • Our country is in distress

  • Interim activity continues, and in our meetings there has been very significant data provided. During the IJC on labor and industry last week, Dr. Kate Akers of the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics reported that nearly 63 percent of Kentucky public high school graduates were college and/or career ready in 2014. While the numbers are an increase over previous years, it is difficult to compare with other states because Kentucky is unique in this measurement.