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Opinion

  • Hal Heiner will move Kentucky forward
    Having been involved in politics for years and having worked on many campaigns and having previously served as the Hardin County GOP Chairman for over eight years and as GOP chairman of the old Second District for four years, I can tell you that only once have I changed my mind regarding which GOP candidate I would support. I have always liked Jamie Comer and I still do, but after meeting personally and speaking with Hal Heiner on three different occasions, I have changed my support from Comer to Heiner. 

  • When it comes to grading Kentucky’s public elementary and secondary schools, what ultimately counts most is whether our graduating students are truly ready for college and a career.
    Over the last several years, one of the state’s newest agencies – the Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics – has been helping measure our progress in this area. Its work is more than just a survey; it’s an in-depth look at an entire graduating class.

  • In State Sen. Jimmy Higdon’s column last week, there was a mistake. The Tennessee Gas Pipeline Project docket number was incorrect. The letter “I” should be the number “1” in the docket number CP15-88-000. Without the exact docket number, one cannot comment online.
     

  • By Elaine Helm

  • Last week, it was announced that the Federal Environmental Regulatory Commission (FERC) will study a proposed conversion of a natural gas pipeline that crosses Kentucky. As you know, this gas line, most of which is underground, was completed in 1944 as a part of a wartime effort to supply natural gas to the Northeast.

  • When the General Assembly passes a new law cracking down on criminal behavior, there is an informal question legislators must first address: Is this someone we’re mad at, or someone we’re afraid of?
    It’s an important distinction. Those we’re afraid of, so to speak, need to be removed from society for a long time, but those we’re mad at need a path forward that helps them re-integrate into private life when their punishment is finished.

  • The deadline for letters to the editor related to the May 19 primary election is 5 p.m, Friday, May 8. Email letters to editor@lebanonenterprise.com or bring/send them to The Lebanon Enterprise located at 119 South Proctor Knott Avenue, Lebanon, Ky, 40033. Limit is 400 words.
     

  • By Mary Taylor

    Hiring managers agree it is critical to expose younger students to high-demand careers such as engineering or industrial maintenance, especially as many industries grapple with a shortage of skilled workers. A key barrier in the pursuit, however, has been finding a way to provide work-based learning to students younger than 18.

  • My dad taught me how to do many things during his life.
    He taught me how to pick out the perfect walking stick during our hikes together, and that trail mix (with M&Ms) is a necessity during long walks.
    He taught me the significance and importance of good photography. The photos he took of my twin sister and me when we were younger are priceless in my eyes.
    And, while I didn’t realize it at the time, he taught me that running can be a way to escape the stresses of life, as well as stay in shape.

  • By G.B. Dixon

    With one simple phrase set to music, George M. Cohan gave identity, community, and mystique to one small area along a common roadway cutting through New York City. That was in 1904, and today people are still singing, dancing, and humming Mr. Cohan's songful commemoration to the world of stage: "Give My Regards to Broadway."

  • Recently, encouraging economic news was reported regarding Kentucky’s revenues and unemployment status. According to the state budget office’s report this month, Kentucky’s revenues increased 4.8 percent as compared to March of 2014. In fact, for fiscal year 2015, which runs from July 1, 2014 to June 30, 2015, receipts are up 4.1 percent and expected to stay that way throughout the final months.  

  • Concern for babies
    It’s sad that we don’t show the same concern for the 3,500 babies murdered by abortion daily that we do for the dog found in Raywick last week.
    God have mercy on us.
    Larry Wheatley
    Raywick

  • By G.B. Dixon

    It will not be religious fervor that makes folks shake, rattle and roll this weekend in Springfield, just a love for the sights and sounds of the 1950s and a ticket to the musical "All Shook Up," presented by the Central Kentucky Community Theatre Youth Actors.

  • As things have seemingly calmed down after the end of the 2015 Legislative Session in Frankfort, I would like to once again address the KTRS issue by reassuring all teachers that we are committed to finding a solution.

  • Kentucky may be a couple of thousand miles away from Hollywood, but that hasn’t diminished our connections to the entertainment industry. Some of today’s most famous actors, for example – George Clooney, Jennifer Lawrence and Johnny Depp – were born here, while Tom Cruise spent part of his youth in Louisville.

  • By Kim Huston

    When the U.S. Commercial Service (USCS) office in Louisville - the export promotion arm of the U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration - first approached Bardstown manufacturer Armag Corporation in 2009 about selling overseas, the company was busy running a well-known domestic business in a niche market. With products that can be up to 2,000 square feet in size and take a few months to build, exporting was not part of their business strategy.

  • MCDC is a model for other jails
    Kay Carlew, Susan Classen, Elizabeth Croom, Maria Visse and I visited the Marion County Detention Center and were impressed with what we found. The entrance is attractive and landscaped. Inside we found a secure, clean, well-lighted facility with space for programs.  Residents are treated with respect and are expected to treat everyone with respect. Mutual respect permeates the facility.

  • If it’s true that it takes years of preparation to be an overnight success, the same can also be said of many laws approved during a legislative session.
    This year is a prime example, with several high-profile measures having been considered by the General Assembly before. That includes those addressing booster seats, dating violence and an update of the state’s telecommunications laws.

  • By Tommy Turner

    Now more than ever, driving a community’s prosperity depends on effectively managing and leveraging workforce development opportunities.
    In the past several years, the Lincoln Trail Workforce Investment Board has focused on progressive efforts that have had a positive impact on our workforce, from strengthening partnerships across the bi-state Greater Louisville region to supporting our communities’ preparation for realignment at Fort Knox to helping transitioning veterans and military spouses connect with employers.