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Opinion

  •  Project Graduation was a success

  • By Matt Overing

    Enterprise intern

     

    Valuing different foarms of expression is something I have found myself doing more and more often as I age.

    In elementary school, I though girls with piercings were weird. As a teenager, I though tattoos were weird. I rarely wore jeans and didn’t understand how people found them comfortable. I didn’t understand why people didn’t like sports. 

    People that thought differently than me were weird. I was the normal one.

  •  For years, I have been interested in the decade 1940-1950, where our young men and women sacrificed so much to fight the Nazi regime in Europe and the Japanese in the south Pacific.

    Never have so many Americans worked in concert to defend democracy and defeat two horrendous and oppressive governments bent on world domination.

    It’s amazing that our men and women both on the battlefield and at home never complained about anything. They knew the job had to get done and they did it.

  • By Jerry Evans
    Guest Columnist

    In light of the recent action taken by the Marion County School Board and other members of our community, there are many unanswered questions.
    1. What prompts the school board to amend the requirements of residency for the present school superintendent? It is said they voted their conscience.
    Was their conscience “Missing in action” when similar circumstances were in evidence during the time that Mr. Donald Smith served as superintendent?

  • The legislative interim period officially began this month. My first meeting was June 10 with the Interim Joint Committee on Education, and we had a full slate. We heard two comprehensive presentations from two educational think tanks. First, we heard from Dr. Gene Bottoms with the Southern Regional Education Board Foundation for Excellence in Education, and Gene Wilhoit, executive director of National Center for Innovation in Education.

  • The Enterprise wrote an editorial Feb 23, 2011, arguing that the superintendent of Marion County Public Schools should live in Marion County. Last week’s 3-1 decision by the Marion County Board of Education to grant Superintendent Taylora Schlosser 18 more months to establish residency in Marion County has inspired us to reiterate our position.
    The superintendent should live in the district. It doesn’t matter if that superintendent is Hugh Spalding, Roger Marcum, Donald Smith, Chuck Hamilton or Schlosser.

  • By Matt Overing
    Summer intern

  • By Jackie Masterson
    Lincoln Trail Area Development District

    At Kentucky Career Center – Lincoln Trail, we’ve transformed the way we empower job seekers and employers.
    You might have heard we changed our name or you might have noticed the bright green arrow we adopted as our new logo. But for job seekers and employers, our transformation means much more.

  • I enjoyed the great article on skateboarding! I asked the city council for a skateboard park approximately six years ago, when they had money to build something. Their reply was it was too dangerous, so they built a disc golf course. I don't think it's used very much.

  • Last week, I covered my first Marion County Board of Education meeting since December. Since then, I have written stories about activities and individuals in the school system.
    But going to meetings is always a little different.
    Normally, meetings are fairly routine, and in general, members of the public only come to meetings when they have a specific issue in mind.
    Last week’s meeting was unusual for me. The room was relatively crowded, with 30 to 40 people in attendance by my own estimate.

  • By Hannah Wilson
    MCHS Class of 2013

    Unless the first line of the vision statement is a joke, Marion County Public Schools have a long, hard road to hoe ahead.  

  • By Mo Miller

    As a small business owner, I learned many years ago that my success is dependent on a team of loyal, skilled employees. Ask any large employer, and they’ll tell you the same. A business can’t exist, a profit can’t be made and an economy can’t thrive without skilled employees.

  • By Erica Osborne
    Director of Student Success at St. Catharine College

    Congratulations, MCHS graduates. More importantly, congratulations to the graduates’ parents. Your child’s diploma belongs just as much to you as it does to them. You spent 18 years packing lunches, helping them with homework, and serving as your child’s personal chauffer as you carted them to school, sports practices, and back home again. 

  • By Susan G. Zepeda, Ph.D.
    President/CEO of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky

    Kentucky students break for summer vacation, some look ahead to summer camp and family trips, while others wonder where their next good meal will come from.  School districts and nonprofits struggle to find ways to assure Kentucky’s lowest income families can offer their children nutritious food during the summer.

  • Did you know that Kentucky has the highest rate of lung cancer in the nation? As you can imagine, dealing with this deadly disease takes a toll on our citizens stricken with it, their families and the communities they live in. On a larger scale, it also has a large impact on our health costs and economy. Our high rates of smoking is a well known link to lung cancer, but another link to the disease is exposure to radon gas.

  • Back door politics led to MCPS mess

  • “Just keep swimming. Just keep swimming.”
    That was the motto for “Dory” an endearing fish on the movie “Finding Nemo.” It was also one of Missy Farmer-Spalding’s favorite adages. She thought of it often after being diagnosed with cancer in August of 2011. No matter how awful, how painful and how scary her battle was she just kept swimming, so to speak.

  • June begins the Interim Period, a time during which legislators meet with their respective committees and monitor any issues within our scope. We also hear testimony and are informed on noteworthy topics that may require us to take action in future legislation.
    I am the co-chairman of the Veterans, Military Affairs and Public Protection Committee. What has my attention right now is the reports of the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs hospitals in the U.S, and the long waiting lists our veterans are placed on to receive critical medical care.

  • Leaders must lead by example
    Wow, it’s unbelievable the turmoil and chaos that has been endured by the Board of Education employees and staff over the past year under Superintendent Schlosser. My sister, Pam Spalding, has made us proud of her accomplishments over the 18 years she was employed there under numerous superintendents.