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Opinion

  • "Everyone wants to be appreciated, so if you appreciate someone, don't keep it a secret."
    - Mary Kay Ash

    I have worked at The Lebanon Enterprise for 12 years now, and the people I work with have become a second family to me.
    I’m not just saying that. I mean it.
    I think they would agree with me, too.
    We are a family.
    We’ve experienced lots of ups and downs together.

  • By Gabby Barnes
    Guest columnist

  • By Dennis Hagan
    Guest Columnist

    Editor’s note: This column was written in response to a column that appeared in the July 23 edition of the Enterprise.

    When I take a look around our great nation (through my own eyes versus the mass media), I see a nation that continues to bloom with compassion and good will. Where great people work hard every day to extend a helping hand to those less fortunate in economics and education.

  • Years ago J.T. Whitlock would run PSA commercials every year when school started. One of his favorite messages was “Drive slow and let them grow.” I thought these were a little on the corny side, but they were effective. Folks, school is starting this week and everyone is a little excited and out of their summer routine. Traffic will be heavy with all the moms and dads headed to school with their children for that first day. School buses will be out on the roads after a short summer recess. So, slow down, be patient and remember: Drive slow and let them grow.

  • High expectations?
    A few years ago, our school district, not the current administration, decided to move the passing grade from 70 percent to 60 percent for middle and high school students. I believe this is an unsound idea for many reasons, not the least of which is that it clearly sends a message that we will accept less and still portray it as mastery. In a “nutshell” we preach high expectations and then lower them.

  • Marion County is a happening place.
    In this week’s edition, we have stories and photos from many different events and attractions that took place within our county lines just this past week.

  • Cinema at the Square is Friday, Aug. 1. This family movie event will celebrate the end of summer reading and kickoff going back to school. All ages are welcome to attend this movie on the lawn at Centre Square.
    The doors will open at 7 p.m. with activities and games planned before
    The movie starts at dusk. Participants can bring their chairs, blankets and snacks, or they can purchase concessions like popcorn and snow cones from the Marion County Public Library Friends of The Library. Proceeds will support future library events.

  • By Matt Overing

    I remember my parents would always remind me to thank the parents of my friends that let me come over and hang out.
    I remember thinking it was stupid, because I was going to hang out with my friends, not with their parents.
    When I moved into my own apartment, I realized why you say thanks when you visit another home. It’s courteous to the owner. I learned to appreciate friends that would come over and say thanks.

  • If you drove through downtown Lebanon earlier this week, you probably noticed city crews digging up part of the street at the intersection of Main Street and S. Spalding Avenue.
    Whatever temporary inconvenience that may cause, know that their efforts will probably go a long way toward reducing the risk of the kind of flooding downtown experienced three times last year.
    By clearing out a blockage where a portion of the storm sewer collapsed, water should be able to flow more freely.

  • From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.

  • OK, let’s try this again.
    The issue of the superintendent’s evaluation was raised near the end of a citizens meeting held June 30 in Loretto. One of the specific issues discussed was whether that evaluation needed to be conducted in open session.
    I was mistaken in some of what I reported last week, and I want to try to clarify as best I can.

  • The past two weeks, I have heard testimony on issues from new temporary tags and the Kentucky Automated Vehicle Information System (KAVIS) for vehicle deeds, to the need for a Veterans’ Center in Bowling Green. This is something I appreciate as a legislator; learning about the complex and various issues so important to our citizens on a firsthand basis. In the district, I recently visited the Dunnville Post Office with Rep. Mike Harmon about the proposed reduction of operating hours. 

  • The July 8 meeting of the Marion County school board yielded some interesting observations. Mr. Barney Tharp was approved on the agenda to address the board, but addressed the public instead.

  • By Jim Skees

    Just as most businesses do not find instant success, a new employee won’t hit full capacity on the first day on the job. Hiring and training a new employee takes time and, for some companies, training new employees presents an expense that might even slow growth.

  • Education is, and probably always will be, a touchy subject. 

    In Marion County, the school system has been a particularly touchy subject in recent months, and based on the letters to the editor we received this week, it probably will be for the foreseeable future.

    Last week, we reported Superintendent Taylora Schlosser’s response to the board of education’s decision to grant her another 18 months to move to Marion County. She saw that as a necessary decision to provide stability to the system.

  • By Kim Huston

     As communities look for an edge in today’s competitive global economy, there are few things as powerful as developing a high-quality workforce. 

    Here in the Lincoln Trail region, it’s exciting to see multiple counties taking steps to develop a highly skilled workforce that is ready to go to work. Leaders in those counties have applied or are in the process of applying for Work Ready Community certification.

  •  Project Graduation was a success