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Opinion

  • Many people within the Marion County Public School system have had heavy hearts lately. It's been a tough school year so far. In August, Lebanon Elementary lost one of its beloved teachers, Betty Jo Higdon, after a long battle with cancer.

  • When my brother, my sister and I were younger, we were told to read for at least one hour a day during the summer. While my mother was at work, somehow I was sure that she would know if I hadn't done my daily reading. Since I knew I was supposed to be reading anyway, I looked for things that would hold my attention.  But I also wanted a challenge.  The copy of "It" that I found in a local bookstore was more than 1,000 pages. When I picked it up, I thought it would fit the bill, and "It" certainly did.

  • Beka Hardin is hoping to make a change, starting here in Lebanon. Sunday, Oct. 3, she is holding the first of what she hopes is many spruce up days for what she is calling Unity4Peace. She plans to meet with like-minded individuals outside of Centre Square around 1 p.m. The premise is simple: people helping people.

  • Suicide Prevention Week just ended on Sept. 11. The topic of suicide is an important one: suicide kills more than most people realize but is very preventable. Nationwide, there are two suicides for every homicide. In Kentucky, there is a three to one ratio. Suicide strikes certain demographic groups more than others. White men, those in jail, and people living on some Native American reservations have higher rates of suicide than what is found in the general population. Among teenagers and young adults suicide is one of top three killers nationwide.

  • Sore feet, aching backs, and dry mouths from eating too much country ham... many Marion Countians are probably still experiencing their own version of a "Ham Days Hangover" after volunteering during the annual festival, which took place this past weekend.

    It's a lot of work for the Marion County Chamber of Commerce and its countless volunteers who spend all weekend working tirelessly so that more than 30,000 people can enjoy one of the top 10 fall festivals in Kentucky.

  • Once upon a time, I had dreams of moving to a big city, living in a fancy studio apartment and working at a large, daily newspaper. But, some dreams aren't meant to come true, and I ended up moving back to Marion County after graduating from college and working for my hometown, weekly newspaper. I would be lying if I didn't admit that sometimes, actually quite often, I wonder what life would be like had I actually pursued those dreams rather than coming back to my small, country hometown. It would have been exciting, no doubt.

  • Like unsightly weeds, campaign signs are starting to pop up in yards across Marion County. No doubt, most sign-posters are sincere in their support of the candidates' whose names adorn their yards, but that doesn't make them any more pleasant to see. But that also means Election Day is coming. This year, it's Nov. 2. With today's edition, we begin our coverage of the 2010 general election.

  • It's been five years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. Last week, I had a once in a lifetime opportunity to visit "The Big Easy" and, I can say with full certainty, New Orleans is alive and well. After hearing stories from my mother, who lived in the French Quarter in the 1960s, I jumped at the chance to visit the city with my friend, Ann, who won tickets to the NFL Kickoff concert featuring the Dave Matthews Band. And... Oh yeah... Some sweet, young gal named Taylor Swift.

  • A pastor of a small Florida church made waves internationally after the national media picked up a story about his plans to burn copies of the Quran on Sept. 11.

  • I am not a person to normally write to the newspaper. But I was so upset this week that I have to express my concerns.

  • This week, The Enterprise is running a news story about Lebanon Medical Solutions.

    Working on this story has been an unusual experience for me as a reporter. Usually, when I do a story about a new business, the owners want people to know where they are and what services they are offering to the community.

  • Gregory Wilson is scheduled to be executed on Sept. 16, by signed "command" of Kentucky's governor. As Gregory is now a face on front pages and a topic of public discussion, I ask to put a face and character to the person who will be killed in the name of Kentucky's citizens. I bear witness that he is not the same man who committed the crime.

  • The Sisters of Loretto have had a major presence in Kentucky and in Marion County in particular for hundreds of years. From their beginnings, they have sought to better the communities in which they work in a number of ways.

    Some of those ways have been more prominent than others, such as their work as educators. Visitors are welcome to walk around the grounds of the Motherhouse, located just outside Loretto. They offer retreat space for groups and for individuals as well.

    But another service they offer has been more subtle.

  • Addiction.

    Many of us have seen what addiction can do to a human being. Whether it’s an addiction to alcohol, drugs, gambling, or a number of other things, addiction ruins lives. Sometimes, it ends lives too soon.

    I know. I’ve seen it happen.

  • It was Saturday evening, Aug. 7, 2010.

    Place: Henning’s Restaurant

    Occasion: Lebanon High School Class of 1970 reunion!

    And believe you me, we came from far and near! Alabama, Denver and Maryland just to name a few.

  • Last week, we had a letter to the editor asking people not to kill rattlesnakes, while elsewhere in the paper we had two photos of people holding rattlesnakes they had killed.

    The irony was not lost on the newspaper staff, as I'm sure it wasn't lost on you.

    The issue reminded me of a story from my own past, when I was an intern at the Sweetwater Reporter in Sweetwater, Texas. Sweetwater is the home of the world's largest rattlesnake round-up (or so they claim). I wasn't working there at the time of that year's round-up, but I did see a few rattlesnakes that summer.

  • No one likes nuisances, and most people don't like being a nuisance to others (with the possible exception of siblings).

    Some nuisances you can deal with on your own by either going somewhere else or by making the nuisance go elsewhere. But when the nuisance is a house, what can you do?

  • Pushing her 5-year-old daughter, Claire, on the swing set in the back yard of their home on Hundley Lane, Betty Jo Higdon looks like the picture of health. Her face is glowing, her smile is vibrant and her laugh is vivacious. She doesn't look or sound like a person who has been fighting breast cancer for nine months.

  • Ready or not, school is back in session in Marion County.

    While many children (and adults) are still getting used to their new routines, including waking up earlier in the mornings, the overall sense seems to be that students and educators alike are energized and ready to get the school year started.

  • Karen Sypher is unbelievable.

    The police officers who investigated her initial accusations against University of Louisville basketball coach Rick Pitino did not find her credible.

    The jury who listened to the evidence and the testimony during her recently concluded federal trial found her guilty of six counts - threatening communications with intent to extort (three counts), making a false statement to a government agent (two counts) and retaliation against a victim.