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Opinion

  • Today (June 17) I had the honor to bid farewell to a wonderful man by the name of Mark Mattingly. He was a big man, with a bold laugh, and was always involved with the City of Loretto. He also worked for Makers Mark in Loretto. I have known Mark for many years, and knew he was very involved with the community, but I in no way realized how much. He did what was expected of him, and did it well. Then he kind of faded into life! He never once expected recognition; just a simple thank you did it for him.

  • Thursday, State Sen. Jimmy Higdon, State Rep. Terry Mills and the Rev. Jim Graf greeted convicted felons at the Marion County Library. Only a few people showed up, but the reason they were there will likely have at least some interest to many in our community.

    Convicted felons lose their right to vote, but, after they have served their time and paid all their fines, fees and restitution, they may have that right restored.

  • As both a former journalist and public official, I read with more than a passing interest the recent story, editorial, and column concerning the actions of the Marion County Board of Education.

  • As the economy goes to the dogs, many dogs end up discarded. The lucky ones either end up in a new home, a rescue group or end up at an animal shelter.  Such was not the case for one Golden Retriever, who found herself no longer the cute, golden-coated puppy with the large brown eyes adored by some family. As a “disposable” animal, she found herself on the road, alone, and finally ended up at the McDonalds in Springfield. You might not think it is such a bad place to be. There is, after all, plenty of food going out their door.

  • What would my dad do?

    I have asked myself that question many times within the past week and a half.

    Apparently, the stars have been out of whack or something because some unbelievably strange things have happened to me in the newspaper world lately. I have found myself scratching my head, in utter dismay, and wondering to myself, "What would my dad do?"

  • If you thought you saw a cement truck with a big pink ribbon painted on it recently, you weren't hallucinating.

    Marion County Concrete has painted the ribbon on one of its trucks to convey a simple message: "Find a Cure."

    Jeremy Hodges, the owner and operator of Marion County Concrete, said they decided to paint the truck in memory of his mother-in-law, who died after being diagnosed with breast cancer a few years ago. He thought about how close his family was with his mother-in-law and with Relay for Life coming up, it seemed like a good time to do it.

  • The Marion County Board of Education and Superintendent Donald Smith speak often about their desire to be "transparent."

    However, a discussion that took place last week during an executive session would seem to contradict that. That discussion, which involved a redistricting issue that could potentially affect an entire neighborhood, should have taken place in open session. But, instead, it was discussed behind closed doors.

  • They say the best time to fix a leaky roof is when the sun is shining.

    Something similar could be said for building a cellular tower where there is no service.

    Bradfordsville area residents have known for a long time that cellular service has been virtually non-existent in the southeastern part of Marion County. This is an issue that affects those residents, obviously, but it also affects anyone who crosses through that part of the county, whether to visit friends and family or even if they are just passing through to get somewhere else.

  • My name is Debbie Drury and I am an 11-year breast cancer survivor.

    With all the horrible things I had heard about this disease, I was absolutely petrified of what I had to look forward to. After a mastectomy (which made me feel so ugly), six months of chemo (which made me so sick) and six surgeries later, including another mastectomy, I was so tired and worn out I didn't know if I was gonna make it or not but I did and I'm here now.

  • Daniel Webster once said, "God grants liberty only to those who love it, and are always ready to guard and defend it."

  • When I was one-and-twenty

    I heard a wise man say,

    'Give crowns and pounds and guineas

    But not your heart away;

    Give pearls away and rubies

    But keep your fancy free.'

    But I was one-and-twenty,

    No use to talk to me.

    — "When I was one-and-twenty"

    By A.E. Housman

    This Saturday, the members of the class of 2010 will celebrate their graduation from Marion County High School.

  • Last week's primary election produced a lot of frustration. I know that for some it produced glee and happiness, but we're going to focus on the frustrated for now.

    I'm not referring to any of the candidates. I'm not even referring to the voters who supported the candidates who lost last week.

    I'm talking about voters who didn't have the opportunity to vote.

  • "We become not a melting pot but a beautiful mosaic. Different people, different beliefs, different yearnings, different hopes, different dreams." - Jimmy Carter

    Marion County, the community I have called home for almost 31 years, has truly become a beautiful mosaic. And it seems fitting that I saw a portion of that "mosaic" during a visit to "Arts and Humanities Day" at A.C. Glasscock Elementary School last week.

  • Last week, after the flood waters receded and the clean-up effort began, Emergency Management Director Kenny Blair paid us a visit here at the Enterprise.

  • While the sloppy racetrack conditions posed a problem at Churchill Downs this past weekend for the Kentucky Derby, it was the 7 to 8 inches of rain Mother Nature dumped on central Kentucky that caused widespread flooding, road closures and other troubles for residents in Marion County.   The rain seemed to be never-ending.   It rained, it rained and it rained some more.

    As a result, many people found themselves trapped - either in their flooded homes or vehicles - and they needed help fast.

  • Have you ever put on a jacket you haven't worn in a while, reached in the pocket and found a few bucks? I've never found more than $5, but still, it's a nice surprise. There's a chance there is another surprise waiting for you at the Kentucky State Treasury.

    State Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was in Lebanon last week to announce that the treasury's Treasure Finders program would be coming to Lebanon tomorrow, May 6. Treasure Finders is a program of the Unclaimed Property Division of the State Treasury.

  • While friends and family of the late Sgt. Randy Sigley were stopping by Bosley Funeral Home to pay their respects Sunday morning, a small group was gathering in the parking lot across the street.

    The Patriot Guard Riders of Kentucky were going over their plans.

    They would stand silently holding American flags as visitors arrived at the funeral home. Later they formed similar lines at Lebanon Baptist Church, where Sgt. Sigley's funeral service was held. And at the Lebanon National Cemetery, they formed a ring of flags as the final prayers were being read.

  • Editor's note: This letter was inadvertently left out of the April 28 edition.

    It is that time of the year for the American Diabetes Association Step Out walk at Keeneland Race Course.

    As a fund-raiser in honor of our grandson, Parker Thomas, we will again be having a roadblock on Saturday, May 1, to raise money for our team, Scoop's Crew. In the past, the people of Marion County have been more than generous at our roadblock and we are asking for your help again.

  • The General Assembly adjourned the 2010 General Assembly Session without finalizing a budget. It is a matter that has caused much frustration and even anger. People should be mad. The fact of the matter is that the Senate would not agree to a fiscally unsound budget proposed by the House that raised over $280 million in taxes and bonded over $1 billion in projects that we cannot afford.

  • National media report that Saturday mail delivery may go the way of the milk wagon, and that a wide majority of Americans think that's OK.

    Hold on.

    Congress must act first, and that is not likely to happen soon. Some Congressional leaders worry about trimming mail service, even if only 35 percent of people surveyed by Gallup last summer disapprove.

    Poll results are guided by the way questions are asked. They don't give a full picture. Knowing that, Congress is not yet ready to decide.