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Opinion

  • By JoBerta Wells

    Landmark News Service

     

    You will be sad to find out that I have had to cancel my grand tour of the country. I know you were looking forward to my travelogue in The Casey County News. Well, it couldn’t be helped, you know. There were too many things against me.

  • By Frank Johnson

    Landmark News Service

     

    Have you ever had one of these moments?

  • Over the past year, President Obama has traversed this nation speaking to a variety of organizations and/or labor groups about jobs.

  • Animal cruelty and pet abandonment are due to ignorance, stupidity and lack of compassion and the act is unconscionable. 

    On a 100-degree afternoon in August, a lone car pulled into the Lebanon Wal-Mart parking lot, opened the door and dragged a poor unsuspecting seven-month-old pup out of the car taking off her collar and simply drove away. By the time we found Bella (that's what we named her), she had been alone in the parking lot for two days in the blistering heat. Her only refuse was a small median strip of grass in the midst of a constant flow of cars.

  • While Halloween was a day for witches, ghosts and goblins, the fondest memory I made during the recent holiday was watching my son enjoy one of the most innocent and pure childhood traditions during this time of year - playing in the autumn leaves.

    It may not seem that significant to many of you, but it was to me. This was the first time (at least that I know of) that my 4-year-old son discovered the joys of playing, jumping and burying himself in a huge pile of leaves.

  • While reflecting on the insignificance of the "Aqua Buddha", I came across a news item that offered a respite from the onslaught of campaign advertising. The Dead Sea Scrolls are getting the Google treatment (more on that later). The text and translations have been available for some time, but digitizing the scrolls and scroll fragments will allow more people access to what is inside. These scrolls were discovered in the 1940s quite by accident. A teenage Bedooin shepherd had gone up to some caves searching for a goat that had gone missing.

  • Marion County Country Ham Days has been a source of community pride for decades. This year was no different as tens of thousands of people arrived en masse in downtown Lebanon for another successful festival.

    The numbers reported during last week's follow-up meeting confirm, that overall, this year's event was another success.

  • Nov. 2 is Election Day. Marion County voters will have a say in local, state and federal races. We encourage every eligible voter to go to the polls. If you don't know where you vote or to cast an absentee ballot, call the Marion County Clerk's Office at 692-2651. We've also had a few late additions. In the past few weeks, several write-in candidates have filed.

  • What were you doing when you were 11 years old?   Can you even remember back that far?

    When I was 11, I was boy crazy and insanely obsessed with New Kids on the Block. My biggest concern was what outfit I was going to wear to school or who I was going to sit by at lunch.

    I was too busy changing outfits to change the world. I was like most kids at that age - more concerned about myself than anything else. Typical, right?

    Not in the world of 11-year-old Noah Jones from Bowling Green.

  • For years, we've been hearing how families spend less time together now than they did in previous generations. We've also seen countless reports on the growing (no pun intended) obesity rates in the United States. Maybe now is the time to do something about it. Just ask long-time physical education teacher Danny Marks. He is living proof of how important regular exercise is. He's not only been a P.E.

  • The United States Supreme Court will soon listen to arguments that will test the very fabric and mettle of the First Amendment’s right of freedom of speech.

    The case stems from members of the Topeka, Kan. Westboro Baptist Church’s constitutional right to picket at military funerals.

  • Editor’s note: This week is National Newspaper Week. Since the 1940s, the Newspaper Association Managers group has sponsored National Newspaper Week. It’s a week-long celebration and recognition of the important role of newspapers in their communities. The theme is “Newspapers - the print and online connector for today’s communities.”

  • Many people within the Marion County Public School system have had heavy hearts lately. It's been a tough school year so far. In August, Lebanon Elementary lost one of its beloved teachers, Betty Jo Higdon, after a long battle with cancer.

  • When my brother, my sister and I were younger, we were told to read for at least one hour a day during the summer. While my mother was at work, somehow I was sure that she would know if I hadn't done my daily reading. Since I knew I was supposed to be reading anyway, I looked for things that would hold my attention.  But I also wanted a challenge.  The copy of "It" that I found in a local bookstore was more than 1,000 pages. When I picked it up, I thought it would fit the bill, and "It" certainly did.

  • Beka Hardin is hoping to make a change, starting here in Lebanon. Sunday, Oct. 3, she is holding the first of what she hopes is many spruce up days for what she is calling Unity4Peace. She plans to meet with like-minded individuals outside of Centre Square around 1 p.m. The premise is simple: people helping people.

  • Suicide Prevention Week just ended on Sept. 11. The topic of suicide is an important one: suicide kills more than most people realize but is very preventable. Nationwide, there are two suicides for every homicide. In Kentucky, there is a three to one ratio. Suicide strikes certain demographic groups more than others. White men, those in jail, and people living on some Native American reservations have higher rates of suicide than what is found in the general population. Among teenagers and young adults suicide is one of top three killers nationwide.

  • Sore feet, aching backs, and dry mouths from eating too much country ham... many Marion Countians are probably still experiencing their own version of a "Ham Days Hangover" after volunteering during the annual festival, which took place this past weekend.

    It's a lot of work for the Marion County Chamber of Commerce and its countless volunteers who spend all weekend working tirelessly so that more than 30,000 people can enjoy one of the top 10 fall festivals in Kentucky.

  • Once upon a time, I had dreams of moving to a big city, living in a fancy studio apartment and working at a large, daily newspaper. But, some dreams aren't meant to come true, and I ended up moving back to Marion County after graduating from college and working for my hometown, weekly newspaper. I would be lying if I didn't admit that sometimes, actually quite often, I wonder what life would be like had I actually pursued those dreams rather than coming back to my small, country hometown. It would have been exciting, no doubt.

  • Like unsightly weeds, campaign signs are starting to pop up in yards across Marion County. No doubt, most sign-posters are sincere in their support of the candidates' whose names adorn their yards, but that doesn't make them any more pleasant to see. But that also means Election Day is coming. This year, it's Nov. 2. With today's edition, we begin our coverage of the 2010 general election.

  • It's been five years since Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans. Last week, I had a once in a lifetime opportunity to visit "The Big Easy" and, I can say with full certainty, New Orleans is alive and well. After hearing stories from my mother, who lived in the French Quarter in the 1960s, I jumped at the chance to visit the city with my friend, Ann, who won tickets to the NFL Kickoff concert featuring the Dave Matthews Band. And... Oh yeah... Some sweet, young gal named Taylor Swift.