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Opinion

  • One issue left unresolved at the end of the General Assembly’s 2014 session focused on whether certain felons should have their voting rights automatically restored once they’ve paid their debt to society.
    It’s likely that lawmakers will revisit the issue in a future legislative session. In the meantime, I hope to clear up one misunderstanding that seemed common in this year’s discussions of the issue.

  • At the start of each legislative session, it is impossible to know which proposals will clear the hurdles it takes for a bill to become law.
    Some are never heard in committee; others may make it through the House or Senate but get lost in the shuffle on the other side. Some may falter because of cost or a lack of time or public support.

  • Sine die came on April 15 at midnight. In case you don't know what “sine die” means (I did not until I ran for the House of Rep) it is Latin for “the end.” This 60-day session was a very busy one with more than 800 pieces of legislation filed, and just over 100 passed into law. The most important bills of this session were the budget bills.

  • Fans of the University of Kentucky and the University of Louisville have had a lot to celebrate in recent years.
    Kentucky won its eighth NCAA men’s basketball title two years ago, and this year's team reached the tournament finals. In the last few years, Louisville reached a Final Four and won its third championship in basketball, sent a baseball team to the College World Series, won the Sugar Bowl in football and sent its women's basketball team to its second championship game appearance.
    But really, that stuff is meaningless.

  • May is National Foster Care Month
    May is National Foster Care Month, and we would like to take this opportunity to thank foster and kinship parents in our community for their hard work and dedication to families across our region. This month provides the opportunity to thank the foster families who provide homes and love to children who need them. Foster parents often become the substitute family for the youth regardless of how long they stay – be it an hour or a lifetime.

  • When the General Assembly left the Capitol late last month for its traditional veto recess – the roughly two-week period a governor has to approve or reject legislation – it was already becoming clear that the regular session’s final two days would be busy.

  • A cutline on page B1 of the April 9 edition should have identified Jeremy Morris as the Marion County baseball player at bat against Pulaski County.

  •  It has been a quiet two weeks at the capitol as the legislators have been away during the veto days. The session will end after the last two days, which are April 14-15. I have enjoyed seeing buds on trees and flowers starting to come out of the ground with these sunnier and warmer days. Soon we will be into Derby season, looking at summer plans and enjoying the beautiful outdoors of our state.

  •  I am emailing this to Lebanon, Kentucky to ask the superintendents and officials to not let the positive people leave Lebanon, Kentucky.

  •  To the citizens of district one, a tough vote will come up this May. Remember all the things that Jackie Wicker has done for the community. He has done so much for Bradfordsville and the community center, including all kinds of things for the seniors and the school.

  •  Traditionally, the last day of a legislative session is set aside just to consider any vetoes the governor may make. Recently, however, the General Assembly has also used the time to wrap up a few lingering issues, and this year is no different.

  •  Teenage drinking.

    It’s a problem.

    It always has been, and it most likely always will be.

  • By Gary Miles
    Executive Director
    Feeding America, Kentucky’s Heartland

  • After hours of work and negotiations lasting through the night, the conference committee of the House and Senate members agreed upon a strong, responsible budget for the next two years. The final budget borrows less money and uses less one-time money to pay recurring expenses than the proposals from the Governor and House. That means both the debt service ratio and structural imbalance are lower.

  • What I learned in Frankfort
    On March 21, with a bipartisan 75-16 vote, HB 31 passed the Kentucky House of Representatives and was sent to the Senate. Senate leadership refused to assign this bill to a committee or allow a vote on Sen. Jimmy Higdon’s related SB 14. In an effort to protect landowner’s rights, Sen. Higdon filed floor amendments to three different bills, which is a total of five bills that Senate leadership didn’t allow to advance.

  • By Molly McMasters
    Guest columnist

    For those in our community who do not know who the Marion County Friends of the Library (FOL) are, let me introduce us. We are patrons, grandmothers, grandfathers, mothers, fathers, sisters, brothers, aunts, uncles, sons, daughters, citizens from all walks of life who live or have lived in Marion County and LOVE libraries; especially our local library.

  • Wicker is dedicated to Bradfordsville
    I am writing this letter in support of my friend Jackie Wicker who is up for re-election as Magistrate District One. Jackie has 11 years experience as magistrate in this district and he has always been our force in fiscal court regardless of his own personal opinions. His duties include budgeting for our county offices, solid waste, economic development, road maintenance and improvements along with a lot of other departments such as the jail, sheriff and EMS. And, he has never once voted to raise our taxes.

  • If legislative sessions start like a marathon, they end like a 100-yard dash, as the House and Senate make a final push to turn their goals into law. Leading the agenda, of course, is the state’s two-year budget and highway plan. Legislative leaders began meeting Wednesday to hammer out a compromise, and the good news is that there is some broad area of agreement.

  • Maybe I’ve become more sensitive after having my head shaved, but lately there seems to be lots of news about young women being ostracized because of their hair, or lack of it.
    Last week, there were two stories in the national news involving schools that attempted to suspend or turn away young girls basically because of their hair.

  • The deadline for letters to the editor related to the May 20 primary election is 5 p.m, Friday, May 2. Email letters to editor@lebanonenterprise.com or bring/send them to The Lebanon Enterprise located at 119 South Proctor Knott Avenue, Lebanon, Ky, 40033. Limit is 400 words.