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Opinion

  • The article “Nurse practitioners gain more autonomy” in last week’s edition should have identified Jim Osbourne as the practice manager at Family and Internal Medicine Associates in Lebanon, not as Dr. Jim Osbourn. The article also should have said there are 3,700 nurse practitioners in Kentucky.
     

  • I usually keep my mouth shut at school board meetings.

  • March promises many things here in Kentucky; for us in the Senate it is preparing for the most difficult part of the job, the biennial budget. As we await the House to pass its version, legislation continues in our chamber.
    On the Senate floor, I had the privilege of welcoming students from my district who paged for me during sessions. I also had the pleasure of participating in a Q & A session with students from Mercy Academy along with other members of the caucus. It is great to hear the perspectives of our youth.

  • With March the last full month of this year’s legislative session, the Kentucky House and Senate are nearing the point where they will focus less on their own legislation and more on finding common ground with the other chamber. While the House is still finalizing several of its key bills, my fellow representatives and I have already passed a productive list for the Senate to consider.

  • HB 31 will protect private landowners from eminent domain

  • On the front page of this week’s Enterprise, there is story about Aaron Glasscock. Did you read it? If not, I urge you to read it now. While it might seem like the script for a movie, it’s not. It’s all very real.

  • I am often asked about how the Kentucky Lottery funds are used in our state. The money raised has provided $2 billion in scholarship and grants for our students in Kentucky.
    In my Senate District for the fiscal year of 2013, 4176 grants and scholarships that were worth $7,289,377 were awarded to our students. By counties, in my district it is evident that thousands of students are recipients of major funds for higher education.
    • Casey County: 537 grants and scholarships worth $888,230

  • I’m told that Google Glass when viewing a person’s face scans the person. It connects to any database on the person and logs the data. That makes the rumor of license plate auto scanners on Veterans Parkway a less violation of privacy, doesn’t it? The police state/Babylon rising grows.
    A quote by Patrick Henry at the Virginia ratification convention of June 5, 1788 seems once to remember.

  • As we near the end of February, the General Assembly has a predictably full agenda heading into what is always its busiest month of the year.
    Enacting a budget to run state government remains our biggest task. The House’s Appropriations and Revenue Committee is right on schedule, however, with its seven budget review subcommittees close to finishing their modifications of Governor Beshear’s proposal. A vote by the full chamber will be held by early March.

  • The Bluegrass Pipeline is being delayed for at least one year. The Williams Company, one of the partners in the project, announced last week that the Bluegrass Pipeline is now scheduled to be in service by mid-2016.
    That announcement was included in Williams’ 2013 year-end financial report. According to that report, Williams made a net profit of $859 million in 2012. That dropped to $430 million last year.
    I’m no financial analyst, but I suspect a decline in profit of $429 million in one year may have been a factor in the Bluegrass Pipeline delay.

  • This week, every household in the county will be getting a copy of The Lebanon Enterprise.
    To some of you, that’s nothing new. You are a loyal subscriber, and we appreciate you more than you know. You are why we do this. You are our most valued customer.

  • This week was a buzz of activity as many school groups, local officials and musicians visited the capital and watched hearings and activity on the Senate Floor. I was excited to host many visitors from my district and see the many faces from around the Commonwealth.

  • I encourage those interested in the health of their communities to urge Kentucky lawmakers to support legislation making all public and work places 100 percent smoke-free.

  •  By Jama Watts

    Guest columnist

    If you live in Marion County, then you probably know the history of the Catholic founders’ migration from St. Mary’s County, Maryland to this area. However, many folks forget the other group of settlers that came here from Virginia, primarily Presbyterian in their beliefs. The cemetery located on North Proctor Knott between Walnut and ML King is a remnant of that settlement.

  •  Seven years after the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly to raise the state’s minimum wage, the Kentucky House of Representatives returned to the issue on Thursday when it passed legislation that follows a similar path taken by that 2007 law.

    This is an issue that is drawing a lot of attention across the country. The National Conference of State Legislatures says 23 states considered raising it in 2013, and Kentucky is one of 20 doing the same this year, with more expected in the months ahead.

  •  By Randy Patrick

    Landmark News Service

    They were unlike any musicians Americans had ever seen before, those four mop-topped lads in their dark suits and skinny ties with their electric guitars and electric charm.

    They might as well have been from lost Atlantis as Liverpool, so novel was their appearance.

  •  I’m sure I join most of you in saying enough already with this winter weather. I know it has been a toll on most folks’ daily routines, trying to figure out what to do with the kids on the no school days, driving on the hazardous roads, dealing with power outages.