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Opinion

  • The earthquake that has devastated the capital city of Haiti is an unbelievably cruel disaster for a country that is already one of the poorest and neglected countries in the world. The thousands of lives that have been lost and the devastation that has been left behind are almost too mind-boggling to comprehend.

    But it's real.

    It may be thousands of miles away from us, but there is a simple way we can help the starving people of Haiti who, we might add, have been starving long before this disaster occurred.

  • The 2009 ice storm was, to say the least, an unpleasant experience.

    Many people had their electricity knocked out for hours, days and, for a few, weeks at a time.

    The storm limited how information could be communicated, knocking out the local radio and television broadcasting abilities.

    And the storm damaged our water supply, and for a short time, no running water was available in the county.

  • Let me start this column by saying that I, by no means, am a perfect pet owner.

    I don't give my pets their vaccines exactly when I'm supposed to. I don't give my dog baths as often as I should. I don't brush my cats regularly (my mom does, however). And, I'm sad to admit it, but I don't play with my pets as often as I should. Believe me, I feel horrible about that last one. In fact, just writing it makes me feel ashamed. But, like I said, I'm not a perfect pet owner.

  • Jimmy Higdon made a habit of providing a survey to his constituents each year he served in the Kentucky House of Representatives. This year, Higdon is heading back to Frankfort as the newest state senator in the General Assembly, but he has continued his practice of seeking input from citizens.

    This week's edition of the Enterprise includes his survey (which also begins on this page). I took some time over the weekend to answer the questions myself.

  • Diet Crack.

    That's what I call Diet Mountain Dew - my beverage of choice.

    Why you ask? Well, because the drink is so addicting it's like crack. Now, by saying that I am by no means making light of an addiction to crack, or any other drug for that matter. My point is that Diet Mountain Dew is literally like a drug to me. I have to have it! If not, I get migraines, become very irritable and... well... I don't know what else because I have never gone but just a few hours without one.

  • With 2010 just around the corner, we've gazed deeply into our crystal ball, but some things still aren't clear to us.

    Based on what we could see, here's some of our hopes for 2010:

    - First and foremost, we hope voter fatigue doesn't set in.

    Dec. 8 voters in Marion County participated in the special election to fill a vacant state senate seat. Feb. 2, we'll be voting again to fill the now-vacant state representative seat.

    A few months after that, we'll be voting in primary elections, and then, of course, the general election will follow in November.

  • With Christmas just days away, the thought of writing a full column on one topic just wasn't going to work. Or maybe it's just the distractions that come with the holidays have rendered me incapable of staying focused on one topic. Either way, instead of a full treatment of anything, I'll offer a few "stocking stuffers" on some items that have caught my attention. - The Jefferson Circuit Court has provided a gift on behalf of open government. Last week, the court issued a decision last week that could have repercussions statewide.

  • The New York Sun editorial is just as true today as it was in 1897.

    In 1897, Virginia O'Hanlon, who was then 8 years old, wrote a letter to The New York Sun. What follows are the letter and the reply that appeared in the Sept. 21, 1897, edition of the Sun.

    DEAR EDITOR: I am 8 years old.

    Some of my little friends say there is no Santa Claus.

    Papa says, 'If you see it in THE SUN it's so.'

    Please tell me the truth; is there a Santa Claus?

    - Virginia O'Hanlan

    115 West Ninety-Fifth Street

  • As I sit here, trying diligently to concentrate on my work, there is a container of chocolate covered Oreos screaming my name. I'm desperately trying to ignore their call, but they are begging me to come rescue them from their Tupperware prison and devour them and their double stuffed goodness.

    Oh, and sitting directly beside the chocolate covered Oreos are Magic Bars that have done a trick on my taste buds, since all I can think about is their perfect layers of graham cracker crumbs, sweetened condensed milk, chocolate chips and coconut flakes.

  • I am frequently instructed as I enter the room to see a new patient, "Be easy on me, Doc. I don't have health insurance." To which I reply, "Neither do I ... not for 15 years."

    Then the conversation turns this way, "How do you do it? Aren't you afraid? What if? What if? What if?"

    Honestly, this is where I live and how I live and here are some of my conclusions. Insurance is based on fear - my faith and my instincts tell me that there is only one appropriate fear - fear of God.

  • We all know the economy is bad. It's been that way for some time, and it's highly unlikely that things are going to change before Christmas. We also realize that when people think of donations, they often think of money first. This year, we want to encourage you to consider donating things instead. Recently, we learned that donations are down at both The Caring Closet and at the Lebanon Goodwill. The Caring Closet supports The Caring Place, a shelter for victims of domestic violence, in a couple different ways.

  • Bah humbug!

    We said the same thing two years ago when we wrote an editorial encouraging local businesses and industries to become involved in the Christmas in the Park display at Graham Memorial Park. But, apparently, we didn't say it loud enough.

    Or, maybe we didn't say it with just the right amount of Scrooge-like gruffness in our voices.

    Nevertheless, the same problem that existed two years ago exists today - there's not enough local support for a worthwhile local holiday attraction.

    And why not?

  • Despite my best efforts, I have not yet been able to convince my family to forgo the annual Christmas gift giving.

    I still hold out hope that some day we will enjoy the holiday for the time we spend together without the added rigmarole of picking out presents for one another. (I understand that some people still enjoy this part of the season, however.)

    With that in mind, I'm here to help, almost.

  • The Marion County Knights football players were understandably down after Friday night's loss to Lone Oak, but we hope with time and distance they will appreciate what they accomplished this year.

    For just the second time in school history, Marion County reached the state football semifinals.

    This year's Knights went 11-3, posting the second-best record in school history. Only the 1987 squad, which finished 12-2 and also reached the semifinals, had a higher winning percentage.

  • Tuesday, voters in Marion, Mercer, Nelson, Taylor and Washington counties have the opportunity to vote for their next state senator.

    Based on the number of signs I've seen, I get the impression that many people have already made up their minds.

    That said, I hope every eligible voter (regardless of who they are planning to vote for) takes some time in the next week to evaluate the candidates, not just their party affiliation. (I'll avoid a rant about how worthless party affiliation is.)

  • Many, maybe even most, drivers will get a ticket at some time in their lives.

    Speeding is the most frequent offense, but it's not the only one. Reckless driving, ignoring traffic control devices and not wearing a seat belt can all attract the attention of a law enforcement officer in Kentucky.

    No one likes getting pulled over, but almost every time, if we are being honest, we know what driving violation we have committed before the officer asks for our license and registration.

  • A city official stopped in the Enterprise this week. When staff members joked with her about running for a state office, her reply was no, she wasn't interested.

    "That's real politics," she said.

    Based on what we've seen so far from the campaigns to fill the vacant District 14 state senate seat, we're inclined to agree with her. District 14 includes Marion, Mercer, Nelson, Taylor and Washington counties.

  • Last week, I had one of those terrible, horrible, no good, very bad mornings.

    It was one of those mornings where I actually had to shut my office door, which doesn't happen very often, as my staff can attest.

    But, when life's "baggage" gets the best of you, I have found that it's effective to shut the door and get your frustrations out in whatever means you feel necessary (without punching a hole in the wall of course).

    It's either that, or going for a good, hard run, taking it all out on the pavement.

  • When then-Governor Ronald Reagan introduced returning POW John McCain at a speaking engagement in 1974, the future president asked, "Where do we find such men?"

    He was speaking of many veterans, when he answered, "We find them in our streets, in the office, the shops and the working places of our country and on the farms."

    In other words, President Reagan was referring to ordinary people accomplishing extraordinary things. And it isn't just the men.

  • Sitting on the gym floor during a school board meeting at A.C. Glasscock Elementary School Tuesday night of last week, I had to choke back tears as I stared through the viewfinder of my camera.

    I tried using my camera as a shield so that no one could see my eyes swelling up with tears. I bit my lip hoping I could stop the water works from flowing.

    But, I failed miserably. I sat there, crouched on the gym floor with tears practically streaming down my face.

    Why on earth was I crying during a school board meeting, you might ask?