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Opinion

  • "We become not a melting pot but a beautiful mosaic. Different people, different beliefs, different yearnings, different hopes, different dreams." - Jimmy Carter

    Marion County, the community I have called home for almost 31 years, has truly become a beautiful mosaic. And it seems fitting that I saw a portion of that "mosaic" during a visit to "Arts and Humanities Day" at A.C. Glasscock Elementary School last week.

  • Last week, after the flood waters receded and the clean-up effort began, Emergency Management Director Kenny Blair paid us a visit here at the Enterprise.

  • While the sloppy racetrack conditions posed a problem at Churchill Downs this past weekend for the Kentucky Derby, it was the 7 to 8 inches of rain Mother Nature dumped on central Kentucky that caused widespread flooding, road closures and other troubles for residents in Marion County.   The rain seemed to be never-ending.   It rained, it rained and it rained some more.

    As a result, many people found themselves trapped - either in their flooded homes or vehicles - and they needed help fast.

  • Have you ever put on a jacket you haven't worn in a while, reached in the pocket and found a few bucks? I've never found more than $5, but still, it's a nice surprise. There's a chance there is another surprise waiting for you at the Kentucky State Treasury.

    State Treasurer Todd Hollenbach was in Lebanon last week to announce that the treasury's Treasure Finders program would be coming to Lebanon tomorrow, May 6. Treasure Finders is a program of the Unclaimed Property Division of the State Treasury.

  • While friends and family of the late Sgt. Randy Sigley were stopping by Bosley Funeral Home to pay their respects Sunday morning, a small group was gathering in the parking lot across the street.

    The Patriot Guard Riders of Kentucky were going over their plans.

    They would stand silently holding American flags as visitors arrived at the funeral home. Later they formed similar lines at Lebanon Baptist Church, where Sgt. Sigley's funeral service was held. And at the Lebanon National Cemetery, they formed a ring of flags as the final prayers were being read.

  • Editor's note: This letter was inadvertently left out of the April 28 edition.

    It is that time of the year for the American Diabetes Association Step Out walk at Keeneland Race Course.

    As a fund-raiser in honor of our grandson, Parker Thomas, we will again be having a roadblock on Saturday, May 1, to raise money for our team, Scoop's Crew. In the past, the people of Marion County have been more than generous at our roadblock and we are asking for your help again.

  • The General Assembly adjourned the 2010 General Assembly Session without finalizing a budget. It is a matter that has caused much frustration and even anger. People should be mad. The fact of the matter is that the Senate would not agree to a fiscally unsound budget proposed by the House that raised over $280 million in taxes and bonded over $1 billion in projects that we cannot afford.

  • National media report that Saturday mail delivery may go the way of the milk wagon, and that a wide majority of Americans think that's OK.

    Hold on.

    Congress must act first, and that is not likely to happen soon. Some Congressional leaders worry about trimming mail service, even if only 35 percent of people surveyed by Gallup last summer disapprove.

    Poll results are guided by the way questions are asked. They don't give a full picture. Knowing that, Congress is not yet ready to decide.

  • Mothers Against Drunk Driving estimate that 11,773 died as a result of drunk driving accidents in 2008 in the United States.

    That's more than 31 percent of the 37,261 traffic fatalities reported that year.

    In 2006, 1.46 million drivers were arrested for driving while intoxicated in the U.S.

    These statistics give us a reason to understand why MADD is so passionate about its mission, but unfortunately, sometimes statistics don't help us understand the consequences of a bad decision.

  • I made a fascinating discovery recently.

    After making some budget cuts at my house, my television channel options were cut in half. I'm an NBC, CBS, and ABC type of gal, so to me it didn't really matter. And, thankfully, I still get Nickelodeon, so my son hasn't noticed that we don't watch Playhouse Disney much anymore. (If it weren't for DVR and the numerous recordings I have of Handy Manny, Go Diego Go and The Wonder Pets, I would be in serious trouble, however.)

    But, I digress.

  • As many of you have heard or read, issues around the state's budget have not yet been resolved. The primary problem is that the Senate and the House Republicans are unwilling to issue $1.2 billion in additional debt and raise an additional $280 million in taxes. We are simply not in a position to increase our debt load.

  • Last week, the cast of "Dearly Beloved" rehearsed in Angelic Hall at the Centre Square Fine Arts Building (the former Lebanon High School).

    The play is being performed twice this weekend by the St. Catharine College Players, but if everything goes according to plan, it could become the first of a series of artistic and educational opportunities that may soon be available in Marion County.

  • I joke with my friends that the robot wars are coming. The only thing is: part of me is only half-joking (I think). It probably didn't help that I saw "iRobot" (in its entirety) for the first time this past weekend.

    Why am I concerned this week?

    No, it's not the release of the iPad, although that doesn't help. (Wireless technology will just make it easier for the machines to communicate with each other.)

    My concern starts with soccer and ends in space.

  • When the Kentucky House of Representatives adopted its two-year budget several weeks ago, my colleagues and I had three main priorities: Streamline government; protect education and our most vulnerable citizens; and kick-start our economy.

  • In a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, Justice William Brennan wrote this country has "a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust, and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."

     

    Kentucky legislators failed to honor that principle when they voted to allow elected school board members to evaluate the performance of school superintendents in secret.

     

  • Do you know how many people in Kentucky are age 65 or older?

    In the year 2000, that number was 504,793.

    How about the number of Kentucky homes that heat with electricity?

    38.8 percent.

    Kentucky's household size? 2.47 people.

    Median age? 35.9

    And the percent of families with children 5 or under who live under the poverty level?

    21.6 percent.

    How do I know all this?

    The 2000 U.S. Census.

    Call up the Census Web site and you are quickly overwhelmed with an avalanche of data of all kinds, shapes and sizes.

  • Disc golf is not my thing.

    Neither is flying miniature jet airplanes.

    And, while my late father would be so disappointed to hear this, I don't dig bluegrass music either.

    But, just because I don't enjoy those things, doesn't mean there aren't hundreds, if not thousands, of other people who do. In fact, there are people who travel to participate in activities like these. Some even travel to Lebanon, as a matter of fact.

     

  • In the General Assembly during this time of year, "March Madness" refers to more than just a basketball tournament as the final hectic days of the legislative session draw to a close.

    In the state Senate, the focus last week was predictably on the two-year budget, with that chamber considering what changes it will make to the House version approved earlier this month. The Senate is scheduled to vote on a proposal early this week, setting the stage for legislative leaders to come up with a compromise by the end of the month.

  • As we wrap up the fiftieth legislative day, the Senate continues to build on our body of work by passing bills addressing domestic violence, education, drug use and treatment, and government efficiencies.

  • Eric Daugherty had one question for the hundreds of people gathered in the St. Augustine School gymnasium Saturday afternoon.

    "Are y'all ready to see some hair hit the floor?" he asked.

    Their enthusiastic cheering said they were.

    After Saturday's event, seven hair stylists had shaved more than 100 heads, leaving a sizable pile of hair on the floor. And that's not counting the 10 heads that were shaved at Big Jim's Friday night.

    This was the fourth year for the local St. Baldrick's event and the 10th year events have been held across the nation.