.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Many, maybe even most, drivers will get a ticket at some time in their lives.

    Speeding is the most frequent offense, but it's not the only one. Reckless driving, ignoring traffic control devices and not wearing a seat belt can all attract the attention of a law enforcement officer in Kentucky.

    No one likes getting pulled over, but almost every time, if we are being honest, we know what driving violation we have committed before the officer asks for our license and registration.

  • A city official stopped in the Enterprise this week. When staff members joked with her about running for a state office, her reply was no, she wasn't interested.

    "That's real politics," she said.

    Based on what we've seen so far from the campaigns to fill the vacant District 14 state senate seat, we're inclined to agree with her. District 14 includes Marion, Mercer, Nelson, Taylor and Washington counties.

  • Last week, I had one of those terrible, horrible, no good, very bad mornings.

    It was one of those mornings where I actually had to shut my office door, which doesn't happen very often, as my staff can attest.

    But, when life's "baggage" gets the best of you, I have found that it's effective to shut the door and get your frustrations out in whatever means you feel necessary (without punching a hole in the wall of course).

    It's either that, or going for a good, hard run, taking it all out on the pavement.

  • When then-Governor Ronald Reagan introduced returning POW John McCain at a speaking engagement in 1974, the future president asked, "Where do we find such men?"

    He was speaking of many veterans, when he answered, "We find them in our streets, in the office, the shops and the working places of our country and on the farms."

    In other words, President Reagan was referring to ordinary people accomplishing extraordinary things. And it isn't just the men.

  • Sitting on the gym floor during a school board meeting at A.C. Glasscock Elementary School Tuesday night of last week, I had to choke back tears as I stared through the viewfinder of my camera.

    I tried using my camera as a shield so that no one could see my eyes swelling up with tears. I bit my lip hoping I could stop the water works from flowing.

    But, I failed miserably. I sat there, crouched on the gym floor with tears practically streaming down my face.

    Why on earth was I crying during a school board meeting, you might ask?

  • If everything goes as planned, Marion County will be home to a new state forest some time next year.

    For more than two years, officials with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife and the state Division of Forestry have been working to acquire an estimated 1,700 acres of property.

    The Marion County Fiscal Court has agreed to be a partner in what has been estimated to be a $2.4 million project, and the county's contribution toward the project is just $100,000, which will mostly, if not entirely, come through in-kind contributions.

  • Fighting fires is not for everybody.

    It's frightening work - not to mention sweltering and exhausting. Oh, and did we mention deadly?

    But, this past weekend we got an up-close and personal look at what firefighters do when they respond to a house fire. Editor/General Manager Stevie Lowery attended a live burn exercise Sunday morning, which was just a portion of the Marion County Fire School that took place this past weekend.

  • Today's edition marks the beginning of what we hope will become a regular feature.

    With all due respect to Fred Rogers, we have started something we have dubbed "People in Your Neighborhood."

    Our intent is for this to be a different kind of feature for our newspaper, and a new way to point the spotlight on some interesting people in our community.

    Sometimes we get so caught up in covering local government, community events and, yes, crime (or at least accusations of crime) that we miss some of the wonderful people living right next door.

  • It all started with a purse.

    A very, very expensive purse named "Stevie."

    No, really, I'm serious. The very, very expensive purse's name - or its design rather - was "Stevie."

    So, obviously, it was the perfect gift for my twin sister to surprise me with on our 30th birthday. You see, I had never been the "expensive purse" type. Give me a cheap handbag from one of our local department stores (or should I say our only department store) and I was good to go. That is, before I was introduced to "Stevie."

  • There was a whole lot to cheer about all over Marion County this past weekend.

    Friday afternoon and evening, thousands of runners trekked through the county - from Maker’s Mark Distillery to Falcon Crest, across the Marion County Veterans Memorial Highway, through Lebanon, up Short Line Pike and onto other adventures - as part of the inaugural Bourbon Chase.

    Sunday, hundreds of ATV and motorcycle riders and hundreds and hundreds of spectators visited a farm south of Bradfordsville for the Rolling Fork Run.

  • Why are they doing this? Why are they doing this? They said when you got here, the whole thing started. Who are you? What are you? Where did you come from? I think you're the cause of all this. I think you're evil! EVIL!

  • Mother Nature may not have cooperated as well as the Lebanon-Marion County Chamber of Commerce would have liked her to this past weekend, but the soggy weather didn't dampen the spirits of those at the 2009 Marion County Country Ham Days festival. The rain poured down from the skies on Saturday, which made for a very wet day of activities, but the spirit that comes alive during Ham Days weekend was evident on the faces that were seen downtown.

  • "Ham Daze." "Hamtastic." "Hambrella Days." And, my all-time favorite... "Burp!" Those are some of the fun, silly and ridiculous headlines and phrases that have been used in The Lebanon Enterprise over the years to describe this community's most beloved festival - Marion County Country Ham Days. "Burp!" has my father written all over it. It was the headline in the edition following Ham Days in 1981.

  • You've probably seen the ad on television. A teenage boy sitting in a cafeteria holds up pill after pill, explaining that they were prescribed for post-partum depression, sciatica, a hysterectomy, and a hip replacement. 

  • The U.S. Constitution requires the government to conduct a census once every 10 years. It's not exactly exciting, and in fact, it's quite tedious work.

    But it is important.

    Counting, or at least trying to count, all of the hundreds of millions of people living in the United States takes a monumental effort by thousands and thousands of people.

    Fortunately, we can help a little, and by doing so, we'll be helping our community at the same time.

  • Chances are each of us reading this article grew up with some interaction with a grandparent. The grandparents from our childhoods or memories probably are similar; we tend to know them as older or elderly, gentle but hard working, perhaps not in good health, maybe retired with leisure time, probably "spoilers", people you visited after church on Sunday or on special days.

  • Last week, Sr. Kay Carlew, the chairwoman of the Marion County Board of Education, read a statement about a recent open meetings violation committed by members of that board.

  • Marion County Board of Education Chairwoman Sister Kay Carlew made the following statement at the board's Sept. 8 board meeting. Her statement was a response to the Enterprise's Aug. 19 editorial:

  • The eighth anniversary of 9/11 has prompted some discredited conspiracy theories to be trotted out once again. 

  • From time to time I get an email offering me an invitation to join facebook. To date, I have and plan to continue to decline this invitation.

    I don't remember when I first heard about facebook. I listened as friends explained to me that they were on it, that they loved it and inevitably that they wanted me to be on facebook, too.

    I've never been a big Star Trek fan, but my perception of facebook is that it is somewhat like the Borg from The Next Generation series. In other words, resistance to facebook is futile.