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Opinion

  • Perk (noun) - A benefit given to an employee in addition to a salary, for example, the use of a car or membership in a club.

    A "perk."

    That's how Marion County Superintendent Donald Smith initially described his use of a board-owned vehicle to make the 56-mile round trip drive from his home in Harrodsburg to Marion County and back each day for work.

    That "perk" also included filling the tank with the school district's gas at the bus garage.

  • H1N1, better known as the swine flu, is here. Here meaning North America, the United States, Kentucky. Eventually, it will get to Marion County.

    But depending on who gets infected, we may never really know.

    The bottom line for everyone is that swine flu is something to be aware of, and it's a good reminder of the common-sense precautions we can and should take to reduce the spread of disease, be it a strain of the flu or something else.

  • There certainly is a lot of debate in Congress as well as small town America about the challenge of reforming healthcare/health insurance in the United States today. An impression that I continue to find missed in the popular media is regarding individual choice by consumers and patients to control our own healthcare outcomes and costs. There is a division that seems to be forming in these discussions about the level of control by the government over these choices, which may impact our healthcare decisions.

  • One of my favorite things to do, if I'm not too busy at work, is to take a break and surf the Internet news sites, including online newspapers, for weird or interesting news stories. Many daily papers have a "weird news" or "offbeat" category that includes many of these types of stories.

    Well, last week, I found myself with a few minutes to spare and I decided to surf for little news nuggets of weirdness and man, I hit the jackpot!

  • Sophomore year - Marion County High School's Valentine's Day dance - that's when it started. "It" being my obsession with being tan.

    I remember asking my mom if I could go to the tanning bed so that I could be tan in the little black number I bought for the dance. She hesitantly said yes, but tried to get one of her friends, Mary Lou Marrett, to talk me out of it. Mary Lou warned me of how bad it was for my skin, how it caused premature wrinkles and how it was highly addictive for some people.

  • Earlier this summer, 18-24 year olds from throughout the Lincoln Trail Area Development District were invited to participate in the GEL-IN program.

    The program was designed to encourage young adults to think green and to encourage entrepreneurial thinking and leadership.

    The program ran from July 15-31, and Madison Beach, Brittany Taul, and sisters Dakara, Imari and Shatara Hazelwood were chosen to represent Marion County.

  • "To me, this is about preserving history and making it available to everyone." - Sergey Brin   The above quote is attributed to one of the co-founders of Google, Sergey Brin, a 35-year-old Russian-American computer scientist.   It seemed a little odd to us.

    When you think of the World Wide Web and the Internet you think of new technology. You think of the future - not the past.

  • Summer is typically the time movie studios release their big multi-million dollar blockbusters on big screens all over the country.

    This Friday, July 31, for the first time in a decade, Marion Countians may have a chance to watch a movie on a big screen in Lebanon. It may not be a summer blockbuster ("Happy Feet" is scheduled to be shown), but the first "Cinema at the Square" should be a memorable event (weather-permitting, of course).

  • It was refreshing to see the guest column in the July 15 edition of The Lebanon Enterprise by Brooke Lee. She expressed very well what some students in our community are trying to accomplish to reduce underage drinking. Many people think the problem of underage drinking in Marion County is minimal or doesn't exist. But, talk to teenagers, they will tell you that it goes on all the time.

  • Years ago, when I still lived and worked in Iowa, I was on a plane from Chicago to Omaha when an older man who walked with a cane and severe limp took the seat next to mine.

    He was on his way back to British Columbia, and he still had to switch planes a few more times before he got home. As we talked, I couldn't help asking him about his health issues.

    When I asked him what he thought of Canadian health care system? He said he loved it.

  • This week's Lebanon Enterprise is depressing.

    Any time we have bad news to report, it's depressing, but it's rare that so much bad news happens all at once.

    During the last eight days, Marion County has experienced a murder/suicide, an attempted murder, the arrest of four firefighters (and reports from the Kentucky State Police that more arrests are possible) and a car accident that forced an emergency Caesarean section. More sadly, the baby, Raelyn Michelle "Skeeter" Gribbins, died the day after the accident.

  • I subscribe to The Lebanon Enterprise, which means I receive my copy in the mail late in the afternoon.

  • YAC, or Youth Advisory Council, was started at the high school two years ago by students who felt there was a problem that needed to be addressed. We meet once a month in the morning before school starts.  Being an active member of this club since its beginning has impacted me greatly. We have made a lot of accomplishments that I had never dreamt of.  The purpose of this club is to raise awareness of underage drinking. Among the students at school, I'm in the minority of kids who don't drink.

  • "A good man's gone" That was the headline of my father's column on the opinion page in the April 8, 1981 edition of The Lebanon Enterprise. It was about his buddy, John Sheperson, who he referred to as "Shep," who had been working as a Kentucky State Trooper in Marion County for 11 years and had been promoted to sergeant, which meant he would be working in Morehead instead of Marion County. I was only a year old at the time, so I obviously didn't read this particular piece by my father, but a copy of the article was given t

  • At a time when the economy isn't exactly stellar, it's nice when something gives a boost to the local economy. Three years ago, the Lebanon Tourist and Convention Commission recruited a model jet show to the Lebanon-Springfield Airport. The event has grown every year, and the 2009 Jets Over Kentucky show was the biggest one yet. More than 100 pilots (representing all 50 states and England) brought nearly 200 model planes and attracted thousands of visitors to the area during the showcase. The show itself expanded as well.

  • Once every three months, Marion Adjustment Center hosts a meeting of its community relations committee.

  • I was four years old when I was first introduced to Michael Jackson.

    Only, I didn't call him that. I called him "Michael Jackins."

    The letter "S" was just too difficult for me to enunciate back then. I didn't have my two front teeth for quite some time as a young child (I have many embarrassing photos to prove it) and the "S" in Michael Jackson was very difficult for me to enunciate, so I just chose not to.

  • As my colleagues and I began the second week of the 2009 extraordinary session, we were still uncertain as to if we would be able to accomplish our foremost mission, addressing our almost $1 billion budget shortfall. With the Senate approving one version of the budget and the House approving vastly a different one, many were unsure about the bill's fate.

  • Less than three months after adjourning the 2009 regular session, my colleagues and I once again find ourselves at the state capitol to address the inevitable - a compounded budgetary shortfall and dismal economic outlook. With the projected shortfall for the upcoming fiscal year surpassing 10 percent, the governor exercised his gubernatorial power to call the legislature to Frankfort for an extraordinary session.

  • It's official. Digital wins.

    The Associated Press has reported that Kodak has announced it will discontinue making Kodachrome film.

    I don't say this with any kind of nostalgia for the days of film. There's no question that digital has helped me both take and process photos, but there is something sad about the end of production of color film.

    I realize that Kodak is not the world's only film maker, and Kodachrome isn't the only color film made by Kodak. Yet, I can't help thinking this is the beginning of the end.