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Opinion

  • I was listening to the news one morning last week and one of the topics was naturally the economy. The banks, the car manufacturers, mortgage companies and then the words domestic violence came into play. Working with women that are going through domestic violence is my job and naturally when I hear those words, my ears automatically perk up.

    As most of us already know, one out of three women will experience some form of abuse in their lifetime. That is startling enough.

  • A small house is being built on Lincoln Avenue in Lebanon. In some ways it's like many other houses in many other small towns.

  • As you read this article, I am back in Frankfort for the special session called by Governor Beshear. The governor called the special session after the Consensus Forecasting Group predicted a $1 billion shortfall in the 2010 budget. Under Kentucky law, the governor can make adjustments to the budget to offset up to a five percent shortfall. The forecasted shortfall for next year is over ten percent; this requires the General Assembly to convene in order to resolve the shortfall.

  • When the 2009 General Assembly adjourned on March 26, my colleagues and I were greeted with the public sentiment that too many issues were left unresolved.

  • It was supposed to be easy.

    All I had to do was get on a plane in Louisville, meet up with my son in Rhode Island, and ride back to Kentucky in his car.

    Something any normal person should be able to do with ease.

    Only one problem.   I've never been normal.

    If I was normal, I never would have attempted to walk from my home to downtown Frankfort on the hottest day of the summer last year.

  • I've watched a lot of Seinfeld episodes in my day, and I've had a chance to meet and cover some pretty interesting people through my work.

    I bring this up because many people I know and care about are going through some big changes.

    Some are going through big changes in their relationships. Others are preparing to welcome a new life into their lives, and still others will be waiting longer than they anticipated to do so.

  • Animal neglect and abuse have always been with us. Studies have shown that neglect gets worse when unemployment increases, but that it did not worsen following the closing of the Texas and Illinois slaughter houses.

    Moreover, slaughter auctions continue, unabated. Horses are simply hauled to Canada and Mexico. Over 134,000 American horses were slaughtered in 2008, the second highest number since 1995!

    Euthanasia is a humane solution for older horses, when their owners wish to rid themselves of a mouth to feed. The cost is minimal.

  • The Caring Closet, located at 221 West Main Street in downtown Lebanon, needs you!

    The Caring Closet is a thrift store and outreach center that assists women and children whose lives have been affected by domestic violence. Our store is open to the public with all proceeds going to help these individuals.

  • Imagine the following scenario:

    You go into the doctor's office for a routine exam. You have a list of errands to run and many other important obligations to tend to, but you decided to take time out from your busy schedule to go ahead and get the exam over with. Sure, the results in the past have always been normal, and you're confident that there is nothing to worry about, but it's better to be safe than sorry, right?

  • Driving around town during Memorial Day weekend you could count on one hand the number of flags displayed. It is so sad that so few bothered to recognize and honor our veterans. What has happened to patriotism?   L.C. Higdon

    Lebanon 

  • This year, Relay for Life is celebrating its 25th anniversary nationwide! As many of you know, Relay for Life is one of the most unifying events that the American Cancer Society has to offer. Communities gather each year to join efforts and raise funds to support the American Cancer Society's mission of fighting cancer through research, education, advocacy and patient services.

    It is for many reasons that hundreds of volunteers participate in Relay for Life each year. For some, they walk proud of the fact that they, themselves, have conquered cancer!

  • Memorial Day gatherings in Marion County have kept alive a tradition that began in 1868 when the holiday - originally known as "Decoration Day" - was first observed. We came together as communities, towns and families to place flowers and flags on the graves of those who gave their last full measure of devotion to our country. But we know our words and actions cannot match the power of the sacrifices made by so many. We honor them. We praise them.

  • "Far better is it to dare mighty things, to win glorious triumphs, even though checkered by failure than to rank with those poor spirits who neither enjoy nor suffer much, because they live in a gray twilight that knows not victory nor defeat."   "The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause/who at best knows in the end the tr

  • The year was 1963. Young, charismatic John F. Kennedy was President, a group of shaggy-haired musicians called the Beatles were taking Britain by storm, and the Rolling Stones were trying to win over the hearts of teenage girls. The economy was booming; the cost of a first class postage stamp was four cents and a gallon of gas cost a whopping 30 cents a gallon!

    In 1963, with the average life expectancy of 69 years, only 17 million living Americans had reached their 65th birthday.

  • Last summer, the announcement - by the governor, no less - that a $43-million chicken processing plant would bring hundreds of new jobs to Marion County was welcome news.

    And just as significant, it would have added some diversity to the county's industrial base.

    The prospect of a new plant opening in the foreseeable future was a reason to remain hopeful, even while the economy continued to decline locally and nationally.

    We expect that many people, including ourselves, are disappointed by the recent announcement that Rancho Poultry will not be coming.

  • For some people, "exercise" is a dirty word.

  • We knew it would come up sooner or later, and we should have known that Bardstown would beat us to the punch.

    The Bardstown City Council recently approved the first reading of an ordinance allowing Sunday alcohol sales in grocery, liquor and convenience stores. It's no surprise that some local residents want Marion County to do the same.

  • In tough times, change is often necessary.

    And there is no question that economically things are still tough. When the economy is bad it affects everything and everyone, and that includes education.

    In response, the leadership team at Marion County High School is planning some changes.

    Unfortunately, we already know that there will be fewer teachers on the payroll next year, and that means the teachers who are left will be asked to do a little bit more.

  • The Loretto Motherhouse will be featured on Kentucky Life on KET1 May 16 at 8 p.m. and May 17 at 4:30 p.m. and on KET2 at 7 p.m. on May 17.

  • Not many things in life are free, but public libraries may be one of the best uses of our local tax dollars.

    The library is where we can educate ourselves, reach out to the world around and let that world into our lives.