.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Thanks to Burger King, I will never be able to look at SpongeBob the same again.

    But, if I'm being completely honest, I never really liked the bright yellow smart allec to begin with, but now I have all the more reason to choose watching my friends Diego and Dora over "Bobby," which is what my son calls him.

  • In today's paper, you'll find a pair of stories about Donald Wayne Smith, who will become the next superintendent of Marion County Public Schools, effective July 1, 2009.

    Newspapers don't always do a good job of explaining why we do what we do, but that's what I will attempt to do with this column.

    These are certain facts we know about our next superintendent - for instance, Smith is 41 years old, married and has three children - but we also realize people in Marion County will want to know more about the next leader of our local school system.

  • Support disabled vets  

    House Bill 20, as written up in an earlier issue of the Enterprise, was passed 97-0.

    It was to give totally disabled vets three free nights a year in our state parks.

    I just found out the Senate threw it out.

    I am very disappointed and feel that it is a slap in the face to Kentucky's totally disabled vets!

    I have written our senators, McConnell and Bunning, and I ask that others write them, too.

    They each have websites that enable you to email them easily.

  • Friday, local and state officials gathered for the ceremonial groundbreaking of what will become the Marion County Judicial Center.

    The new center will house the circuit and district courtrooms and the circuit clerk's office. The old courthouse, which was built 74 years ago, has served the county well, but a new judicial center is a necessary expense.

  • Recently, all the elementary schools in the district celebrated an Arts and Humanities Day. Artists, musicians and performers of all kinds visited the schools to share their creativity and skills with students. These arts and humanities days were planned to support the curriculum and instruction given by elementary art, music, drama and dance teachers while also providing the knowledge that the arts are alive in their very own community. These young students joyfully experienced a broad range of the arts from West African visual art to the Appalachian tradition of square dancing.

  • Watch for motorcycles

    Since spring has arrived, wonderful motorcycle weather is here! I'd like to put out some reminders to help make motorcycling safe.

    Please do not go out and buy your teenager a crotch rocket (sport/racing bike) or any other kind of bike until he/she takes the Kentucky Motorcycle Rider Education Program. Without proper training, these bikes can be death machines.

  • After nearly a month and a half without any kind of dead animal removal, the Marion County Fiscal Court has put all the pieces in place for the county to begin providing the service on its own.

    This is a good thing for farmers and for the rest of the county.

  • As is tradition with every legislative session, the Speaker's gavel sounded adjournment to this year's Regular Session, but that is where the similarities to sessions of the past end. The 2009 General Assembly began with an air of uncertainty and proceeded with the passage of vital legislation. We have now adjourned using only one of our two constitutionally allowed veto days.

  • A shiny red dress, a crystal ball, and a stage jam-packed with students singing "The Kingdom of Swing"... those are a few of my fondest memories of school in Marion County.

    Notice, there is no mention of a textbook or even a classroom. In fact, instead of a pencil, there was a microphone. Instead of a desk and a chair, there was a stage. And instead of a chalkboard, there was a sea of my peers watching me complete my "assignment."

  • Exchange student experience is rewarding

    I have been involved with foreign exchange students now for several years as a local coordinator with CIEE: Council on International Educational Exchange. In that time, I've learned that the world can be made better through cultural exchange through the CIEE mission to help people gain understanding, acquire knowledge and develop skills for living in a globally interdependent and culturally diverse world.

  • A potty training two-year-old, breeding flamingos, beautiful beaches and scary, slimy fish with teeth... those are just a few of the things I had a chance to experience and enjoy recently during my first-ever family vacation in Florida.

    It was the first "real" vacation I had been on in nearly five years, but for some reason when I returned I felt like I needed another vacation. I guess that's where the two-year-old comes in, huh?

  • A passion for helping people   In remembrance of David Ford (my brother).

    This is your favorite sister as I would always say to him.

    Tuesday, Feb. 10, 2009, was the worst day of my life, and Wednesday, Feb. 11 through Friday, Feb. 13, were the hardest days of my life to get through.

    My brothers, Darrell and David are my rocks to lean on and my protectors. Both my brothers are wonderful.

    I wanted to talk about him at the funeral service. But it was so hard at the time.

  • When the Marion County Board of Education first met with Mike Oder, the consultant it hired to help with its superintendent search, Oder shared an important truth with them.

    If the search goes well, and the district hires a strong candidate, the board of education and the screening committee will get credit for doing a good job.

    If the search goes poorly, and the district hires a candidate who doesn't fit well, the board of education will get the blame.

  • Making wishes come true... Marion County High School students have been doing it for three years now. Through their tireless efforts and fund-raisers, such as this past weekend's Junior Mister competition, local students have been raising money for the Make-A-Wish Foundation.

    For almost three decades, the Make-A-Wish Foundation has been granting the wishes of children with life-threatening medical conditions.

  • As my colleagues and I left Frankfort on March 13 for constitutionally designated veto days, a common sense of relief was felt knowing we had approved some key pieces of legislation that are awaiting the Governor's signature into law and will have far reaching effects on a number of our citizens. In last week's column, I shared with you the highly anticipated passage of Senate Bill 1, which eliminates the Commonwealth Accountability Testing System through a phase out process.

  •  

  • Kentuckians are known for many things. We are known for horse racing, for bourbon and for tobacco. We are known for being part of the Bible Belt, and we are known for our nearly religious devotion to our favorite basketball teams.

    And we're also known, regrettably, for not caring too much about education.

    We know there are many individuals who do care - deeply and sincerely - about how and what their own children and all the children in our community are taught.

  • "Are you going to shave your head this year?"   That's a question I have been asked regularly the past few weeks. While I definitely need a trim, I'm not feeling brave enough to shave my curly locks during this year's St. Baldrick's event.   I know, I know. I'm such a wuss. Jama Watts, who shaved her head last year, reminds me of that anytime the subject is discussed.   You're right Jama. I admit it. I am a wuss.

  •  I don’t have a Facebook account, nor do I intend to create one (so quit asking). Despite that, I know about the “25 Random Things About Me” phenomenon because I’ve seen several news stories about it.

  • Cells, science, ethics, medicine, and morals: just some of the words that describe the world of stem cell research. To the average American, this is just some educated mumbo-jumbo that is hardly worth following. The Bush Administration cooled the flames of stem cell research in early 2001, by limiting the amount of taxpayer dollars that could be spent on the research.