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Opinion

  • By Eliza Jane Schaeffer
    Guest columnist

  • Saturday morning I witnessed something so amazing and beautiful it almost took my breath away and made me cry all at the same time.
    I visited the Working the Puzzle for Autism Center to take photos of the children participating in a painting activity. I knew there would be some great photo opportunities there. But, to be honest, I just like going to the center. It’s such a happy place, and I love watching and interacting with the children. They are so very special.

  • By G. B. Dixon

    If we have learned anything during the festive months just passed, it is that second helpings are the natural consequence of a pleasing first course. 'Seconds' divert us for a little while longer from life's toils and woes, or help us forget the taste of some preceeding yuck. Where the first is good, so generally goes the second. Such promises to be the case when Kentucky Classic Theatre brings back its wildly popular production of "Steel Magnolias" this week.

  • Floor votes, committee hearings, and spirited debate highlighted an action-packed second week of session in the Kentucky Senate. Guests from all corners of the Commonwealth were welcomed to Frankfort to speak on behalf of various bills.
    On Thursday, we were visited by hundreds of young and energetic faces celebrating Children’s Advocacy Day, sponsored by Kentucky Youth Advocates. The group hosted a rally in the capitol rotunda where several senate majority members were recognized for their efforts in standing up for Kentucky’s children.

  • An effort to help potentially tens of thousands of Kentuckians truly put their past behind them cleared a key legislative milestone on Friday when the Kentucky House voted to broaden eligibility for criminal expungement.

  • By Virgil McCloud

    Transitioning from military to civilian life, and finding the right fit in the civilian workforce, can be a frustrating and trying experience. As I’ve learned firsthand, leaving the military isn’t just about finding a new job. It’s leaving everything you’ve known for years and entering into new territory.
    Annually, in the Army alone, more than 100,000 soldiers make this transition. Of those, upwards of 3,000 exit from Fort Knox. This past year, I was one of them.

  • “History repeats itself, and that's one of the things that's wrong with history.” - Clarence Darrow

    In the case of Marion County and its delinquent garbage accounts, history is most certainly repeating itself.
    While it’s a new problem for Marion County Judge-Executive David Daugherty, who just began his second year as judge, it’s an old problem for the county and one that, frankly, I thought we had under control.

  • From the patriotic medleys of the 100th Army Band to chants of citizens passionately advocating a cause, the sounds echoing through the hallways of our Capitol signaled just one thing – the 150th General Assembly was in session.
    After just the first week, Senate Majority had rolled out its priorities. It’s 13 bills that are a mix of both new and familiar. Many of the bills have been discussed in concept through last year. Some of the bills will even enjoy bipartisan support.

  • I had the opportunity to read the Enterprise’s story on Floyd Cook. Cook was certainly not a monster. He was much worse.
    Cook’s sister stated how much he loved animals and his church going practices because he loved animals and went to church. Does that give him the right to shoot law enforcement officers and try to run over them with his vehicle? Does loving animals and going to church give him the right to go around raping women?

  • If the final days of a legislative session are spent deciding what laws the General Assembly will pass, then the first few days are focused on what the House and Senate hope will be on that list.
    Setting those priorities was the main theme last week as other legislators and I returned to the Capitol and began filing legislation to kick off the 2016 regular session.
    In the House, we will again work toward strengthening the Kentucky Teachers’ Retirement System (KTRS), which is facing a multi-billion dollar liability and needs a plan to adequately address it.

  • As we usher in the New Year and the 150th regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly, I’m honored to represent your district. This will be my 13th year in the state legislature.
    During even-year sessions, we are required to pass a two-year budget for the commonwealth. It’s a tall order to pass a budget during even the most prosperous of times, but we’re committed to rolling up our sleeves and working together to adopt a fiscally responsible spending plan that addresses Kentucky’s most pressing needs. It’s a goal we all share.

  • As members of the General Assembly return to Frankfort for the 2016 Regular Session, they will find themselves facing a multitude of challenges, one of the more critical being pension funding.  Legislative action in the 2013 Regular Session provided the framework for funding the plans managed by the Kentucky Retirement Systems (KRS). Public employee (and teacher) pensions will require tens of millions of new dollars in the budget simply to stem the erosion of funding levels.  

  • Lebanon Mayor Gary Crenshaw emailed the following statement to The Lebanon Enterprise on Monday afternoon:

    This press release is intended to correct misinformation which has been disseminated publicly by private persons and is patently false. 

  • This week, as it has regularly done since Kentucky became the nation’s 15th state in 1792, the General Assembly returns to the Capitol to start another legislative session.
    Since it is an even-numbered year, the House and Senate will meet for 60 working days and wrap up our work by April 15, as required by Kentucky’s constitution.
    Our biggest task during this time will be enacting a two-year state budget that will take effect next July. While it is too soon to say what policy decisions will be made, the overall numbers are already known.

  • As we get ready to close out 2015, let me wish you and your family a happy New Year!
    It’s time again for members of the Kentucky General Assembly to meet for a 60-day legislative session that is frequently called a “budget session.” During this time, my colleagues and I will work to develop a two-year budget for state government. We will also discuss other issues important to Kentuckians including jobs, economic development, education and health care.

  • As the General Assembly readies for a return to the Capitol next week to start another legislative session, it is worth taking a look back on what has happened since the last one ended in late March.
    This period is known as the interim, and it gives the House and Senate’s two dozen joint committees – plus several temporary ones – time to review the issues affecting the state in a less pressure-filled setting. In some cases, meetings are held across the state.

  • By Jerisia Lamons

    Teamwork makes the dream work.
    That mantra is essential for job seekers. The job search process has evolved into a more tactical process. As such, a strong, broad professional network has become a crucial resource in the job search process.
    A professional network consists of connected, like-minded people willing to help you achieve professional goals and improve your career. This team of people understands your skills and career goals, and can leverage their own networks to improve your chances of landing the right job.

  • In the Best of Marion County section last week, Henry Brockman was listed on the back page for Best Concrete Finishers. As reflected on the inside of the section, Brockman and Sons, owned by Tracy Brockman, was actually voted Best of Marion County this year. We regret this error and any confusion it might have caused.

  • As we approach the holidays I would like to take this opportunity to say Merry Christmas to each of you and to your family. My wish is that you can take time out of your busy schedules to enjoy family and celebrate the reason for the season.
    The holidays provide a brief break before the 2016 General Assembly. The debate of how to address the Kentucky employees’ and teachers’ retirement systems combined estimated $25 billion in unfunded liabilities will likely dominate to session as legislators work to pass the state’s next 24-month budget.

  • Around this time of year, we often find ourselves counting, whether it is the number of days left in the year, the number of presents we still need to buy or the number of calories we put on our plates. The holidays are when many count their blessings as well.
    In that regard, 2015 has turned out to be a pretty good year in many respects for the commonwealth.