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Opinion

  • By Lisa Williams

    Entrepreneurship is the backbone of our business community, and as our region grows, it’s clear entrepreneurs will play a key role in creating jobs, bringing ideas to life and expanding our communities’ quality of life.
    Global Entrepreneurship Week, Nov. 16-22, sets out to celebrate entrepreneurship - from the small retail business owner to those who have grown major industries – and to connect new entrepreneurs to the resources and information they need to take their next steps.

  • By Heather French Henry
    Commissioner
    Kentucky Department of Veterans Affairs

    They were untested. Young, green American troops. To the eyes of the British and
    French soldiers, worn out by four years of trench warfare, the Americans looked highly unlikely to hold the line against the Germans marching on Paris.

  • I’m impressed every time I walk into the Kentucky State Capitol to do the business of the people. Its marble hallways are full of memorials.
    A large bronze statue of former President Abraham Lincoln stands in the center of the Capitol rotunda. Portraits of state Supreme Court justices line the second-floor hallways. Porcelain miniatures of Kentucky’s first ladies grace the area just off the rotunda. And a bust of Colonel Harland Sanders even greets visitors entering from a side entrance.

  • Rise to the challenge – VOTE!
    It's the morning after the Kentucky state elections, and I am furious! Not at who won or who lost, but that three quarters of Kentuckians could not even bother themselves to get out and vote yesterday for who would lead our state for the next four years!  

  • While last week’s gubernatorial election marked the end of this year’s campaign season, it also kicked off the beginning of a transition period that has been guided by tradition and the state constitution for much of our history.
    Not quite 60 people have served as governor since Kentucky joined the United States in 1792. In the beginning, voters did not have a direct say. Instead, the decision was made by a group of electors, similar to our presidential elections today.

  • By Carter Dyson

    Awareness of the need for soft skills in the workplace has undoubtedly increased in recent years. Time and time again, we hear from employers seeking personal traits such as punctuality, strong work ethic and leadership ability. Often, soft skills take priority over hard skills, as employers are willing to train candidates who possess characteristics like loyalty, strong communication skills and the ability to work in a team environment. 

  • “Be an encourager. The world has plenty of critics already.” – Dave Willis

    Being criticized is a part of life.
    Depending on what you do for a living, you might be criticized often.
    And, let’s be honest, it stings.
    But, what is even more bothersome is when people are critical of others without any understanding of what it’s like to walk in the other person’s shoes.

  • By G.B. Dixon

    Retirement is a stubborn thing, jealously guarded by those who own it. So it was with no little coaxing that Kentucky Classic Theatre lured Lynn D. Farris away from his passion for it and back to the world of stage, to direct his first community play in 30 years. Ronald Reagan was president of the United States then. That was in the days of the Lebanon Community Theatre. Days turned to memories.

  • I can’t describe the emotion I felt when I learned of the state retirement system board’s decision to keep its current executive director, extend his contract for 30 months and award him a 25-percent raise – to $215,000 annually.

  • On Nov. 11, our nation will come together as it has for nearly a century to pay tribute to those who have sacrificed their time, talents and even their lives and limbs to preserve our freedom.
    Altogether, there have been more than 40 million men and women who have been part of the U.S. Armed Forces since the Continental Army was first established 240 years ago this past June. Tens of millions more have served, or still are serving, as members of the National Guard and the Reserves, both of which trace their history back even further.

  • What would you think if several miles of a 70-year-old natural gas pipeline in your county was converted to carry hazardous liquids? Industry giant Kinder Morgan plans to do just that. The hazardous liquids are highly explosive and pose a myriad of health and community safety risks, yet they are colorless and odorless, so you won’t know that you’ve driven into a vapor cloud until your car explodes.

  • Artoberfest a huge success; Centre Square is an asset
    On Saturday, Oct. 17, Kentucky Classic Arts and the Marion County Arts & Humanities Council co-hosted a very successful fundraiser called Artoberfest. Because of the generosity of artists, volunteers, and businesses, we raised thousands of dollars for local arts events and education. As one of the event organizers, I am extremely grateful to all involved.

  • By the Reverend Anthony Gilbert
    Minister of the First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

    From its embryonic formation at the conclusion of the 1980's, the House of Foundation was the starting point, which evolved into the Community Service Center. The person responsible for this benevolent outreach to meet the needs of the less fortunate of Marion County was the Reverend Father Ivo Cecil. It was through his compassionate vision as guided by God that something special had been created and continues to the present.

  • It’s hard to miss with the TV commercials, direct mailers and yard signs soliciting votes – but Kentucky is about to have a general election.
    The candidates, including those running for governor, have done their jobs. Now, it’s up to voters to do their jobs.

  • As a matter of public policy, domestic violence, sexual assault, human trafficking and bullying were seldom discussed for much of our country’s history, much less adequately addressed. Thankfully, that era is largely behind us. Today, society is much more aware of these acts of aggression and how to stop them, and as a result, we’re seeing a greater number of victims get the care they deserve.

  • By Carrie Bridgman

  • Autumn marks the transition from summer into winter when the arrival of night becomes noticeably earlier and the temperature cools considerably. It’s also the time of year when some sports fans start feeling frustrated if their favorite teams or coaches haven’t lived up to expectations. This year’s letdowns remind me of some of the disappointments of years past.

  • On behalf of the AARP Foundation Tax Aide program, I want to recognize the Marion County Extension Office for hosting our Tax Aide site there for more than 10 years. Volunteers from other counties have manned your local site but they are either resigning from their positions or moving to another location. Thus, it is with regret that I must close this site unless we can recruit two or three local volunteers. 

  • In a month where we often turn on the air conditioning during the day but the heat at night, it seems appropriate that October has been set aside nationally to raise awareness of our energy needs.
    This annual designation began nearly a quarter-century ago and gives us an opportunity to especially highlight renewable fuels and energy conservation, twin areas where Kentucky routinely gets high marks.

  • By Warren Hawthorne
    Guest columnist

    Since its opening in 2012, the Marion County Heritage Center has been growing new exhibits. The center now devotes two rooms to Don Johnson, a local trumpet player. It also houses the largest private collection of J.W. Pepper musical instruments. Recently, Friedemann Immer gifted Don Johnson his childhood trumpet, which is on display. Immer is a world-class baroque trumpet player. The heritage center also has a trumpet that is believed to be from the Royal Family of England.